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Apple testing Safari 4.0.5 with Flash plug-in crash protection - Page 2

post #41 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePixelDoc View Post

Get the F*** outta here! If anybody is "emotionally dysfunctional, it is you "sir"! We've been over this on a different thread, and you actually did a pretty good job showing us some "decent" uses for Flash. Yippee! However, personally attacking other poster's for writing their opinions, which in this case was quite entertaining, is plain "boorish"... and may I remind you, against the forum rules!

To being with, if you are concerned about personal attacks being against the forums rules than why are you doing it to me?

Secondly, I stand by my statement that equating Flash to beating children is out of line. Domestic violence is a real issue and for those who have to deal with it in real life it is neither funny nor entertaining.

There are some issues in life that it is simply inappropriate to make light of, such as racism, sexual discrimination and many others. Domestic violence is one of them. I do sincerely believe that anyone who views Flash in the same light as beating children, or even someone who just thinks that is funny, does need to seriously reevaluate themselves.

MOST of us know, there are some issues that just aren't laughing matters.

Some lyrics come to mind:
John Oszajca - I Hate You ( My Friend ) Lyrics[/QUOTE]

You Hate me? Really? I can't imagine expending that much energy on you. You don't mean enough to me for me to hate you. I'm flattered.
post #42 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhartt View Post

A "much improved Plug-in manager" could mean a wide variety of things. Although I doubt Apple would do it, but I'd certainly welcome something like Click2Flash functionality as a native control in Safari. It wouldn't need to be targeted at Flash specifically, perhaps by offering customized control of other plug-ins as well. But if they did add it, then the Apple/Adobe drama would certainly get even more interesting.

I think that would be a good idea actually. I like the idea of being able to have a menu of some kind that allows me to toggle plug-ins instead of going into the pref menu every time. I do have to wonder if most people realize however that the content you don't like seeing in Flash isn't going to go away if you turn off the plug-in. Its just going to come back in another form.
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Cool. Besides improved security and performance I hope they implement separate processes for each tab.

I used the latest Google Chrome for several days. The opening and closing of the app as well the speed of the app itself was great. The only reason I moved back to Safari was for the much better history, including visual history. Other than that, I was sold..

I really enjoy Chrome as well. Primarily because I like it's minimalist UI. As for Safari, I still sue it but I I cant really stand the visual history feature. It takes so long to load it just ends up getting on my nerves. Plus, I usually know where I am going.

In the end I still use Firefox because of I like it's debug tools the best although I do feel like Firefox is edging ever closer to IE in more ways than just popularity. I actually have more issues with that browser than any other on the mac side.
post #44 of 48
Very interesting, I have yet to experience this crash!

Jess
www.total-anonymity.us.tc
post #45 of 48
So, one day, Jobs and the rest of us who hate Flash will get our wish, and it will be supplanted by HTML5, or some other as yet unnamed technology. Probably something that we can't disable, turn off, remove, disregard, purge, or ignore. We'll get our blinking, dancing monkees, and our embedded videos with unremoveable marketing. Every site we visit everywhere will be festooned with super-urgent messages begging us to try this, buy that, click here or go there. We'll be nickel and dimed at every click of the mouse or swipe of the finger. And we'll pine for the good ol' days when we actually controlled our own content.
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by dualie View Post

So, one day, Jobs and the rest of us who hate Flash will get our wish, and it will be supplanted by HTML5, or some other as yet unnamed technology. Probably something that we can't disable, turn off, remove, disregard, purge, or ignore. We'll get our blinking, dancing monkees, and our embedded videos with unremoveable marketing. Every site we visit everywhere will be festooned with super-urgent messages begging us to try this, buy that, click here or go there. We'll be nickel and dimed at every click of the mouse or swipe of the finger. And we'll pine for the good ol' days when we actually controlled our own content.

That's an interesting point actually. I think there will still be a way to block unwanted code through adblock, because it even blocks text ads, but simply removing flash through click to flash will no longer protect against ads I guess. That is some food for thought.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
post #47 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

That's an interesting point actually. I think there will still be a way to block unwanted code through adblock, because it even blocks text ads, but simply removing flash through click to flash will no longer protect against ads I guess. That is some food for thought.

In theory, the only thing that is going to stop ads is users no longer clicking on them, but currently that just leads to more intrusive ads. Although surprisingly enough, I have seen a ton of metrics on this and ALOT of users actually do click on ads. Who are they? no idea, I haven't done it in years. But it works on a least some people.

The problem here is that advertising is the driving economy behind the web. For the most part the web is basically ad supported. Taking that away would decimate the economic model of the web as it stands right now. Although you could argue it's not a very successful model anyhow. most businesses already have a hard to monetizing their web presence, particularly media providers.

Perhaps if the majority of content on the web was subscription based we would no longer need ads? I can't really say I have a solution but I can say that until a better economic model becomes viable ad blocking will always be viewed as a negative thing by business and they will always develop their way around whatever the current ad-blocking solution is.

One of the most annoying trends I have seen lately is when I go to a site that doesn't even let me view the site until I view an ad, and forces me to click those annoying, "click here to continue to blahblah.com" buttons. Not sure how we can block that.
post #48 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by alkrantz View Post

One of the most annoying trends I have seen lately is when I go to a site that doesn't even let me view the site until I view an ad, and forces me to click those annoying, "click here to continue to blahblah.com" buttons. Not sure how we can block that.

Stop using those sites / feeding them income.
Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
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Most of us employ the Internet not to seek the best information, but rather to select information that confirms our prejudices. - Nicholas D. Kristof
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