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Apple sees 98% iPhone growth as Microsoft, Google prepare for battle - Page 2

post #41 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomfoolery View Post

It's also comparing year-over-year figures to the three-month period that includes two flagship product releases and a massive marketing blitz.

Comparing short periods growth is meaningless. You need to look at the big picture (year-over-year).

Quote:
But let's break it down by numbers. Apple has sold something on the order of 20 million iPhones, give or take. That data for January 2010 says that about 10 million of those are in the US. So let's estimate that half of Apple's iPhone sales are in the US.

Actually Apple sold 24.9 million iPhones in 2009 and more than half of those are sold internationally. You can tell exactly how much iPhones were sold in the US by looking into AT&T quarterly press releases.

Quote:
According to that data, a total of about 1.8 million Android-platform phones were sold in the US during the period in question. Impressive growth, to be sure. But Apple sold 8.7 million iPhones over the same period, and we can guesstimate that half of those were in the US.

So total sales of 1.8 million phones during the platform's biggest launch period to date versus 4.3 million phones sold during what should be a relatively slack period leading up to an anticipated new-product rollout.

The Android platform's growth is impressive, but when you look at it in context it really doesn't say anything definitive either way.

I supplied a link in the previous post. The Android phones will grow at fast pace as well because it is replacing other platforms (WinMo and others) not the iPhone.
post #42 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... Android has a few advantages, in that it licensees do not have to pay any fees, and it allows manufacturers to differentiate their phones from other Android devices with custom interfaces. But Android also has no presence on the enterprise market, where Microsoft and its entrenched position with Windows will play to the Redmond, Wash., company's advantage. ...

I wonder when these analysts will finally figure out that the Enterprise market has pretty much no sway over this platform and is essentially irrelevant to it's success?

The Enterprise market is about the desktop. They need to be mobile and will of course use whatever mobile devices are out there, but as long as device a, b, or c, *connects* to the Enterprise backend infrastructure (and all the major player do this), there is nothing about the Enterprise market that will drive sales or adoption.

The new mobile platform is a consumer platform. The most significant difference between these devices and those we had previously is that they draw in users who otherwise wouldn't be in the market. There is no path to success that involves making the ultimate "Enterprise" smartphone. Even RIM knows that, which is why their answer to the iPhone was to create their first (semi) consumer friendly phone.

RIM *owns* the corporate smartphone market and Apple is not taking it away from them. What is going on is that Apple, and now Android are growing the (previously stunted) consumer part of the market, which is about a thousand times larger. All the studies have shown for years now that the growth of this market is due to newcomers. There has to be Enterprise *support* in all smart-phones, but the Enterprise market itself is not going to drive anything. The whole idea is just a misconception based on how the *desktop* market has worked in the past.

The past is the past. Future is now.
post #43 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by swtchdtomak View Post

"Microsoft has delivered on the necessary condition for success -- a smartphone operating system that should enable it to play in the same sandbox with Apple, Google and BlackBerry,"

No they haven't and they won't until the fall at least.

Indeed.

As with almost every product they make, all they have really done is come out with a technology demo of what their OS *might* look and work like when it finally arrives. Microsoft has a long history of doing this kind of thing, beginning with Windows 1.0.

They announce a vapourware product to stop the competition even as they have no idea if they can actually even make the thing or make it in time. After missing a few launch dates and when people start getting edgy about whether they are being led down the proverbial garden path, they announce a firm date for the product release, but when it's released it's actually a "preview" or a beta, or even an alpha product, which they then rapidly fix based on the howls of discontent from their buyers.

Read the article linked above. It happened with Windows 1.0 just like it happened with Vista and pretty much every other thing they have ever released. This is their standard operating procedure and always has been. Microsoft is a joke IMO.
post #44 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

Show me where WP7 is a copy of the iPhone. From all the videos I've seen, the WP7 OS looks and operates completely differently than the iPhone OS.

Umm, just look at the phone itself. It looks like an iPhone. LOL.

Operates, maybe yes, but overall it's a same thing. How does Microsoft think that people gonna throw their iPhones and get Win7 Phone? There's nothing new or game changing in Win7.

Microsoft should just stick to what they do best. XBox.
Apple had me at scrolling
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Apple had me at scrolling
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post #45 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

Show me where WP7 is a copy of the iPhone. From all the videos I've seen, the WP7 OS looks and operates completely differently than the iPhone OS.

You're asking for the impossible, given that WinPho7s shares absolutely nothing in common with the iPone's endless grid of icons/app/widget launcher posing as a modern GUI.

This whole 'everything copies the iPhone' rhetoric is just another case of mindless spewing of baseless Apple-standard talking points.

End of Story
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #46 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post

Indeed.

As with almost every product they make, all they have really done is come out with a technology demo of what their OS *might* look and work like when it finally arrives. Microsoft has a long history of doing this kind of thing,

not only that. until anyone actually has a real production model WinMo 7 phone to work with, no one knows yet what might be wrong with it and its revamped UI. all they can discuss - as with the iPad too - is its list of features. which are much less important to consumers (most phones do most things anyway) than how easily and consistently it "just works" and makes them satisfied.

the Android Nexus is a perfect example. big hype, glowing reviews, now big flop in sales. it failings only became evident with extended use. and remember the Storm? no?
post #47 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

stagnant sales? Where's igenius?

lol

*
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post #48 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

98% growth! GREAT GOOGLY MOOGLY.

Very impressive.

Many said very similar things about the Madoff numbers for almost two decades..
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #49 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I think IT loves MS because IT is MS's primary customer, and so MS treats IT much better than they treat you and me. Seems to me that it breaks down like this -- Google's primary customer is advertisers (with Google, you and I are not the customer -- we're the product). Microsoft has two main clients: OEMs and corporate IT. Apple has one client: consumers (aka, "end-users").

So you see, MS only needs to make a product that is just good enough for consumers to be willing to accept it for free (because their company provides it to them). Google has to make a product just barely good enough for consumers to accept it for free (because advertisers pay for it). Only Apple has to make a product good enough that people would actually buy it with their own money.

So if WinMo7 is good enough that end-users will tolerate it if they don't have to pay for it, then MS has crossed the bar with end-users. At that point, all they have to do is convince IT to spring for it, and that won't take much.

Google's problem is that phones aren't free. Either the consumer or an employer is going to have to pay for it. But Google isn't really targeting either one -- Google is focused on advertisers. I think that means that ultimately neither corporate IT nor consumers will be happy with Google phones.

This is incredibly insightful.

+1

What a great post...
post #50 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

Umm, just look at the phone itself. It looks like an iPhone. LOL.

Operates, maybe yes, but overall it's a same thing. How does Microsoft think that people gonna throw their iPhones and get Win7 Phone? There's nothing new or game changing in Win7.

Microsoft should just stick to what they do best. XBox.

I think you failed to acknowledge the near 90% market share that Microsoft Windows currently enjoys, which shows no signs of diminishing given the overwhelming success of Windows 7.

"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #51 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by gin_tonic View Post

What is 98% growth in comparison with 150% growth, huh?

During last 3 months the market share of Android increased by 150%, from 2.8% to 7.1%
http://www.comscore.com/Press_Events...r_Market_Share

Gee... I guess the iPhone had a bazillion percent YOY, QOQ, MOM, WOW, DOD, HOH, mom, sos growth if you measure in July 2007.

C'mon... let's be realistic!

*
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post #52 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

Umm, just look at the phone itself. It looks like an iPhone. LOL.

Operates, maybe yes, but overall it's a same thing. How does Microsoft think that people gonna throw their iPhones and get Win7 Phone? There's nothing new or game changing in Win7.

Microsoft should just stick to what they do best. XBox.

I did look at the phone. Doesn't look like an iPhone to me. Aside from having a screen and (drumroll please!) buttons. I had this discussion on another thread, but all these devices look like each other because they're all just screens and buttons. The iPhone obviously wasn't the first mobile device in the world (though it seems like you treat it as such). One could argue that the iPhone looks like the iPAQ or HP PocketPCs of old.

"Overall", every OS does the same thing. The iPhone OS does the same thing as older WinMo OS, so does that mean that the iPhone OS is a copy of WinMo? No.

MS does XBox spectacularily and they plan to integrate it into WP7. From the videos I've seen, it looks like they're headed in the right direction for XBox integration. Lets say that they get game studios onboard with WP7 (you'll probably attack me on this assumption ). Having mobile versions/compliments of the XBox games would be a good selling point.
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post #53 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I think IT loves MS because IT is MS's primary customer, and so MS treats IT much better than they treat you and me. Seems to me that it breaks down like this -- Google's primary customer is advertisers (with Google, you and I are not the customer -- we're the product). Microsoft has two main clients: OEMs and corporate IT. Apple has one client: consumers (aka, "end-users").

So you see, MS only needs to make a product that is just good enough for consumers to be willing to accept it for free (because their company provides it to them). Google has to make a product just barely good enough for consumers to accept it for free (because advertisers pay for it). Only Apple has to make a product good enough that people would actually buy it with their own money.

So if WinMo7 is good enough that end-users will tolerate it if they don't have to pay for it, then MS has crossed the bar with end-users. At that point, all they have to do is convince IT to spring for it, and that won't take much.

Google's problem is that phones aren't free. Either the consumer or an employer is going to have to pay for it. But Google isn't really targeting either one -- Google is focused on advertisers. I think that means that ultimately neither corporate IT nor consumers will be happy with Google phones.

Well said, but here comes the however. Nobody gets Microsoft products for free. Now if you're talking only about employees of corporations not paying for them, then I see your point -- but the companies still have to pay someone, whether they pay Apple, or RIM, or some OEM packaging Microsoft's or Google's OS into their phones. It's still a choice, and not an obvious default choice, as it has been for desktop computers, where the standardization argument has won the day for the last 25 years.

I certainly understand the "just good enough" threshold, which has been Microsoft's MO for decades now, but I wonder if the full employment element isn't still at work in the thinking of IT people.
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post #54 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by IQ78 View Post

This is incredibly insightful.

+1

What a great post...

Agree. +2
post #55 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

The obvious question is, why does corporate IT still love Microsoft? The obvious answer of a few years ago at least was that their lousy buggy products created full employment for IT professionals. The other was most IT people were MCPs who really didn't know anything else. Is that still true?

To Microsoft's credit they do make some pretty solid server products that integrate well. Apple gets a lot of praise around here for their ecosystem but MS has a pretty tight ecosystem of their own. I use a mix of Unix and Windows servers and I don't have any complaints about the Windows servers for reliability or ease of use. But to answer your question, from my personal experience in dealing with corporate IT, is that midsize companies usually don't have the most talented IT people. If they need to do anything remotely complex they usually hire outside contractors.

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post #56 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

Umm, just look at the phone itself. It looks like an iPhone.

In all fairness, I think we're seeing, and will continue to see, a convergence of design in phones. There are only so many ways to make a device that has a multitouch screen, that fits in your hand and your pocket, and that can be held to the ear when not being used with an earpiece. After years of really crappy industrial design in phones, we're finally starting to get to a form-follows-function place.

Unfortunately, firms like Microsoft are still clinging to the idea that a single-use physical button is a good thing. A "Bing button?" Come on. Waste of space.
post #57 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

[CENTER]I think you failed to acknowledge the near 90% market share that Microsoft Windows currently enjoys, which shows no signs of diminishing given the overwhelming success of Windows 7.

[/CENTER]

Well obviously it is declining since it used to be 98% before Mac OSX and Linux. Win 7s sales are not overwhelming but solid for a platform upgrade. Remember, there are still a lot of people on XP let alone Vista who are not going anywhere soon. My 100,000 person company won't upgrade to 7 until everyone has HW that will acceptably run it and they have troubleshot all the corporate Apps which is likely 2-3 years away...

Desktop share is clearly not a determinant of mobile and entertainment device success or why would iPod be so dominant and everything but WinMo be 90%+ of the mobile market?

WinMo 7 may or may not be the bees knees but your logic clearly isn't.
post #58 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post

Well obviously it is declining since it used to be 98% before Mac OSX and Linux. Win 7s sales are not overwhelming but solid for a platform upgrade. Remember, there are still a lot of people on XP let alone Vista who are not going anywhere soon. My 100,000 person company won't upgrade to 7 until everyone has HW that will acceptably run it and they have troubleshot all the corporate Apps which is likely 2-3 years away...

Desktop share is clearly not a determinant of mobile and entertainment device success or why would iPod be so dominant and everything but WinMo be 90%+ of the mobile market?

WinMo 7 may or may not be the bees knees but your logic clearly isn't.

DaHarders reply was to the poster who said that the ONLY thing MS did well was the Xbox.

The point is, if that were true, then MS would not have 90% of the desktop market.
post #59 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

It's because MS has incredible sway over corporate IT. You just can't ignore or underestimate that. IT *loves* MS. All MS has to do is create a phone that won't cause users to revolt, and they'll sell a ton of them to corporations.

"We've frequently criticized Microsoft's inept efforts in delivering a user-friendly smartphone operating system. Such criticisms are now in the past."

Both comments say.... Microsoft will make a phone that does not SUCK SO BADLEY.... and so it will be a success.

LOL, ROFLOL..... Oh yea of such great faith. I say use that faith and buy Microsoft stock. Its such a great company after all.....

Just a thought,
en
post #60 of 88
Is there a link to the original report anywhere? I don't see it linked from AI's article at all.

On the subject of Android vs. Windows Phone, if I was running one of the large phone manufacturers then I would choose Android without a second thought. The license fee for Windows Mobile is currently around $15 per unit. If you're looking to play with the big boys then your aim must be to sell 50-100 million smartphones per year. Who wants to be paying Microsoft $1.5bil in license fees a year when the competition is arguably better and free? OK, so Microsoft probably throws in some free support but I doubt it's anywhere near enough to off-set the cost of the licenses.

As smartphone sales explode even further, that license fee is only going to be a bigger and bigger obstacle.
post #61 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Well said, but here comes the however. Nobody gets Microsoft products for free. Now if you're talking only about employees of corporations not paying for them, then I see your point -- but the companies still have to pay someone, whether they pay Apple, or RIM, or some OEM packaging Microsoft's or Google's OS into their phones. It's still a choice, and not an obvious default choice, as it has been for desktop computers, where the standardization argument has won the day for the last 25 years.

I certainly understand the "just good enough" threshold, which has been Microsoft's MO for decades now, but I wonder if the full employment element isn't still at work in the thinking of IT people.

Yeah, I agree that clearly someone has to pay. My point is that corporate IT is willing to pay Microsoft, because Microsoft really does cater to them. I am no fan of MS, but I have to admit that they do pay much more attention to the needs of IT than Apple does. Basically, MS can say to IT -- here's a phone that fits in perfectly with all of your other MS-based infrastructure ("ecosystem", if you will). Maybe that's true, maybe it's not, but just as Apple's brand carries a lot of weight with consumers, MS's brand carries a lot of weight with corporate IT guys.

And while I'm sympathetic to the idea that IT likes MS because it creates more work for IT, I really do think we have to acknowledge that MS really has done more to cater to that market than Apple has. It's hard to get too excited about buying from a company that isn't interested in your business, and that has been Apple's attitude towards corporate IT for a long time. And let's also remember that a lot of IT people just don't know anything about Apple products, so for them there would be a learning curve.

The bottom line is that corporate IT most likely is willing to pay for WinMo phones. So all MS has to do is make a phone that end-users will accept "for free" (meaning, their company pays) because the company will be willing to pay.

Google's problem is that they need to figure out a way to give phones away for free to everyone. Maybe they will eventually figure out how to do that, but it hasn't happened yet.
post #62 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

That's US only

Android worldwide market share went from 0.5% in 2008 to 3.9% in 2009. I will repeat to you what few here have been saying when the iPhone experienced such fast growth in first year "it is not much growth if you started from zero"

So Android's growth was nearly 800%? I didn't know that.
post #63 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

I think that means that ultimately neither corporate IT nor consumers will be happy with Google phones.

Well, if we can believe the figures cited in this thread, those who are happy with Google phones grew by nearly 800% last year. And if we look purely at the end of the year, it looks like Android's growth might be accelerating.
post #64 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

That's US only

Android worldwide market share went from 0.5% in 2008 to 3.9% in 2009. I will repeat to you what few here have been saying when the iPhone experienced such fast growth in first year "it is not much growth if you started from zero"

Ironic, given Mr. Tonic's sig.
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post #65 of 88
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Originally Posted by IQ78 View Post

This is incredibly insightful.

+1

What a great post...

Seconded.
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post #66 of 88
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Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post

Well obviously it is declining since it used to be 98% before Mac OSX and Linux. Win 7s sales are not overwhelming but solid for a platform upgrade. Remember, there are still a lot of people on XP let alone Vista who are not going anywhere soon. My 100,000 person company won't upgrade to 7 until everyone has HW that will acceptably run it and they have troubleshot all the corporate Apps which is likely 2-3 years away...

Desktop share is clearly not a determinant of mobile and entertainment device success or why would iPod be so dominant and everything but WinMo be 90%+ of the mobile market?

WinMo 7 may or may not be the bees knees but your logic clearly isn't.

...and what does any of that have to do with the comment to which I was responding?

"Microsoft should just stick to what they do best. XBox."

Answer: Absolutely Nothing.
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post #67 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by grking View Post

DaHarders reply was to the poster who said that the ONLY thing MS did well was the Xbox.

The point is, if that were true, then MS would not have 90% of the desktop market.

Thank You

"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #68 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iGenius View Post

So Android's growth was nearly 800%? I didn't know that.

It took the original iPhone six months to achieve 5.2% worldwide smartphone market share. No one is saying Android is not gaining market share. You were saying that the iPhone market share is stagnating, which is not true.

PS: I don't know where you learned math but that should be 680% not 800%.
post #69 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by grking View Post

DaHarders reply was to the poster who said that the ONLY thing MS did well was the Xbox.

The point is, if that were true, then MS would not have 90% of the desktop market.

Actually, given the entrenched and heavily leveraged nature of the desktop PC installed user base, MS could pretty much do nothing for the next 10 years and still have the lion's share of the market.

They could still be selling XP and be doing perfectly fine; even the bad press surrounding early versions of Vista didn't really move the needle much. It's just too expensive to move all those beige boxes over to a new platform. The "excitement" over something like Windows 7 doesn't really mean much beyond the same Windows users get some new pretty and some statistically insignificant number of users that might be persuaded to stay put rather than jumping ship to OS X or Linux (or, I guess, at some point, Chrome).

Apple and Jobs have acknowledged as much, and are working feverishly to move the battle to new ground: hence, the iOS and the platform buildout.
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post #70 of 88
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Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Yeah, I agree that clearly someone has to pay. My point is that corporate IT is willing to pay Microsoft, because Microsoft really does cater to them. I am no fan of MS, but I have to admit that they do pay much more attention to the needs of IT than Apple does. Basically, MS can say to IT -- here's a phone that fits in perfectly with all of your other MS-based infrastructure ("ecosystem", if you will). Maybe that's true, maybe it's not, but just as Apple's brand carries a lot of weight with consumers, MS's brand carries a lot of weight with corporate IT guys.

And while I'm sympathetic to the idea that IT likes MS because it creates more work for IT, I really do think we have to acknowledge that MS really has done more to cater to that market than Apple has. It's hard to get too excited about buying from a company that isn't interested in your business, and that has been Apple's attitude towards corporate IT for a long time. And let's also remember that a lot of IT people just don't know anything about Apple products, so for them there would be a learning curve.

The bottom line is that corporate IT most likely is willing to pay for WinMo phones. So all MS has to do is make a phone that end-users will accept "for free" (meaning, their company pays) because the company will be willing to pay.

Google's problem is that they need to figure out a way to give phones away for free to everyone. Maybe they will eventually figure out how to do that, but it hasn't happened yet.

Apple hasn't made any real effort in this area, if only because doing so requires them to go head-to-head with Microsoft, something they have wisely avoided, even as the Apple brand has been resurgent. Microsoft is winning essentially by default.

All of this sort of begs the question, though. Surely the previous incarnations of WinMo have been "good enough" to meet the relatively low standards of corporate IT guys.
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post #71 of 88
"My company's IT group had to be dragged kicking and screaming by the president of the company and several VPs to accept employees using their personal iPhones for work e-mail, and that was only because those top guys flat out refused to use a WinMo Phone."

My employer bans use of iPhones and iPod touches during work hours.
post #72 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

[CENTER]...and what does any of that have to do with the comment to which I was responding?

"Microsoft should just stick to what they do best. XBox."

Answer: Absolutely Nothing.[/CENTER]

Almost a fair point but then you let your rhetorical hysteria get the better of you... My follow on (about mobile OS) was taking your reply out of context (though true).

We can all agree that MS is still a pretty effective monopolist. However you state 2 things to back up your comment - that MS OS share is not declining and and Win7 has been an overwhelming success. My main point was that those 2 points are wrong even if it was adequately refuting the XBox comment (which was obviously tongue in cheek). That's what I was responding to.

MS OS share is declining over the long term, far more so if you include mobile smart-devices as computers and Win7 was a solid upgrade but is not reducing the share slide, just reshuffling the Win sub-OS shares (XP/Vista/Win7).
post #73 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

Show me where WP7 is a copy of the iPhone. From all the videos I've seen, the WP7 OS looks and operates completely differently than the iPhone OS.

C'mon, AsianBob. It does have touch screen, right? Volume up/down?
post #74 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

stagnant sales? Where's igenius?

They might have tremendous sales, but if equal number of people is leaving iPhone for something else (or just replacing 1st gen iPhone for a new one) then their market share is stagnating, even if sales are still strong.

I'm not saying that is happening - I'm just saying strong sales are not necessarily sign of gaining market share.
post #75 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmuk View Post

I'm always amazed at the credit Microsoft gets. We're still at the start of the year and WM7 debuts near the end, an age in the smartphone world and almost 4 years after the iPhone debut. And it could still be delayed even further.

What evidence is there that this will be in the same league as the fast maturing Android nevermind iPhone 4.0? All we've seen so far is some computer generated demos, not even a proper working prototype if I'm not mistaken (same with Courier, real artists ship and all that...).

I'd say it comes with the size. It is like everyone is obsessed with US presidential elections. No one cares about, say, Lithuanian elections (well except Lithuanians and neighbours).

You are right about other thing - no one can tell at this point how good WP7 will be, but concept looks promising. It also looks different, which is great thing considering that most other solutions are copying iPhone to a degree.

Of course some people will like it and some will hate it, but if executed right, with good Exchange and MS Office integration, it might turn to be valid business alternative to Blackberries, and also interesting for home users with its social networking features and sleek GUI. Add to that Courier and Zune HD2 based on the same platform (and I would personally expect iPad-like oversized Zune tablet soon after)... yes, there is a lot of potential there.
post #76 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

It's because MS has incredible sway over corporate IT. You just can't ignore or underestimate that. IT *loves* MS. All MS has to do is create a phone that won't cause users to revolt, and they'll sell a ton of them to corporations. My company's IT group had to be dragged kicking and screaming by the president of the company and several VPs to accept employees using their personal iPhones for work e-mail, and that was only because those top guys flat out refused to use a WinMo Phone. But if the WinMo phones weren't such disasters -- if they were halfway credible -- then the IT guys probably would have won the argument.

The company that gets way too much credit is Google. Their Android "strategy" is so typically googlish in nature -- totally naive and lacking in serious commitment. Google just isn't up to the hard work of making a platform work. Apple and MS are.

So the first battle will be MS beating Google for the right to challenge Apple as the leader in the smartphone market.

I had strong feeling Blackberry is still the leader in the smartphone market, and probably hardest one to beat. But I would not ignore Nokia just yet.
post #77 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by iVlad View Post

Umm, just look at the phone itself. It looks like an iPhone. LOL.

Operates, maybe yes, but overall it's a same thing. How does Microsoft think that people gonna throw their iPhones and get Win7 Phone? There's nothing new or game changing in Win7.

Microsoft should just stick to what they do best. XBox.

There is a lot of new in WP7. Yes it does look like iPhone, or BB Storm, or Nexus... and they all look like old Palm Tungsten T5. Which, of course, looks like Newton or something else from before.

Human physiology and practical reasons dictates the way device like phone or PDA will look like. Having shuriken shaped phone would be tremendously fun, but very impractical for using and carrying.

At the end of the day, it is user experience that will differentiate it from other phones (for good or bad), same as iPhone user experience differentiated it from other phones. Apple users should be aware of that and respect it, like I do; having both company Nokia E63 and iPhone with me most of the day, I can say that almost all things can be done on both, but reason I prefer my iPhone is because of the smooth elegance those tasks are performed on iPhone.

If WP7 manages to create its own smooth and unique user experience (and we already can say it will be very unique), it will do well.
post #78 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AsianBob View Post

I did look at the phone. Doesn't look like an iPhone to me. Aside from having a screen and (drumroll please!) buttons. I had this discussion on another thread, but all these devices look like each other because they're all just screens and buttons. The iPhone obviously wasn't the first mobile device in the world (though it seems like you treat it as such). One could argue that the iPhone looks like the iPAQ or HP PocketPCs of old.

"Overall", every OS does the same thing. The iPhone OS does the same thing as older WinMo OS, so does that mean that the iPhone OS is a copy of WinMo? No.

MS does XBox spectacularily and they plan to integrate it into WP7. From the videos I've seen, it looks like they're headed in the right direction for XBox integration. Lets say that they get game studios onboard with WP7 (you'll probably attack me on this assumption ). Having mobile versions/compliments of the XBox games would be a good selling point.

Thank you, I dont get guys that scream out "it looks like an iPhone" of course all touchscreen phones are going to look similar. Just like a Sony 32" LCD TV looks like a Samsung 32" LCD TV but I dont hear guys yelling about that. Guys get over it, and if anything all these phones look like the LG Prada which was out before the iPhone.
"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
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"Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example" Mark Twain
"Just because something is deemed the law doesn't make it just" - SolipsismX
Reply
post #79 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

[CENTER]I think you failed to acknowledge the near 90% market share that Microsoft Windows currently enjoys, which shows no signs of diminishing given the overwhelming success of Windows 7.

[/CENTER]

And just think, you can go to any wal-mart or Costco and pick up whatever Win7 PC your heart desires, since by now the only option on every PC a person can buy anywhere...is Win7.
post #80 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

We've frequently criticized Microsoft's inept efforts in delivering a user-friendly smartphone operating system. Such criticisms are now in the past.

Hold on one big fat minute there, Charlie. You make it sound like WinPhone7 is a done deal. It's not delivered yet, and won't be for 6 months or more.

Time travel hasn't been invented yet, so just be patient until the product actually exists.
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