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post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamrin View Post

Right. I was just explaining why I think PDFs "dominating" the internet shouldn't elicit the same negative response that .doc files do. I don't consider PDFs proprietary in the same sense that .doc is.

Ah. I see, and agree. I personally don't understand why so much document exchange occurs with .doc files when for the most part (in my experience) these are not documents you want someone else to edit.

Had some work recently where the previous consultant on the project sent the client a .doc file of their report, which the client apparently took as an invitation to edit it and add their own conclusions. What a mess that created.

Be careful who gets your word processing files. Be very careful.
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post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by giosaccone View Post

I fully agree with you! Microsoft shoud develop Office for ipad quickly!!

Well Microsoft has been working on a web based version of Office but it probably won't be available until late this year or early next year. Check out the link below:

http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/F...PDCOffice.mspx
post #43 of 55
Keynote has a MAJOR FLAW with it that Apple refuses to fix.
You can't 'package' the presentations.

Keynote needs a 'package' function, like Powerpoint has .ppt package option that allows the end user to still control the presentation, but not make changes to it.

As it stands now - Keynote only plays the source Keynote files. Meaning if you design a presentation for someone, you have to give them your source files.
(exporting it as quicktime is useless as the end user loses control over the presentation).

I'd pay $5000 for keynote if it had a package function.... Steve... you reading this?

This is by far a greater concern then the ability to share documents online, yet...

Common Apple, give people what they are clamoring for and not some crappy service that is nice, but nobody is asking for. \
post #44 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

Keynote has a MAJOR FLAW with it that Apple refuses to fix.
You can't 'package' the presentations.

Keynote needs a 'package' function, like Powerpoint has .ppt package option that allows the end user to still control the presentation, but not make changes to it.

As it stands now - Keynote only plays the source Keynote files. Meaning if you design a presentation for someone, you have to give them your source files.
(exporting it as quicktime is useless as the end user loses control over the presentation).

I'd pay $5000 for keynote if it had a package function.... Steve... you reading this?

This is by far a greater concern then the ability to share documents online, yet...

Common Apple, give people what they are clamoring for and not some crappy service that is nice, but nobody is asking for. \

You can save all associated files (images, movies, etc.) into a single keynote file that you can move around and email and the like. Look under Advanced Options when you save. Are you talking about creating a file that can play without requiring the keynote app itself? If that's what you're talking about, that would be great, and using iWork.com to play presentations in the browser (cross-platform, too) would be one way to accomplish it.
post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by benice View Post

The cool thing is that with the new iPad we'll soon have quite a few options available to us whenever we want to write something meaningful.

That's groovy, because I have been looking forward to wanting to write something meaningful.
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

You can save all associated files (images, movies, etc.) into a single keynote file that you can move around and email and the like. Look under Advanced Options when you save. Are you talking about creating a file that can play without requiring the keynote app itself? If that's what you're talking about, that would be great, and using iWork.com to play presentations in the browser (cross-platform, too) would be one way to accomplish it.

I think he's probably referring to a runtime version, which to really work, would require Apple to develop a Windows version of Keynote. Ever since the rumors of iWork on the iPad started making the rounds, I've had a gut feeling that a Windows version of iWork is coming. Now that iPad iWork is real, it seems almost inevitable.
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post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

You can save all associated files (images, movies, etc.) into a single keynote file that you can move around and email and the like. Look under Advanced Options when you save. Are you talking about creating a file that can play without requiring the keynote app itself? If that's what you're talking about, that would be great, and using iWork.com to play presentations in the browser (cross-platform, too) would be one way to accomplish it.

You can save Keynote in Quicktime.

As well, you export it in html including navigation controls and view in a browser. Why would it be necessary to use iWork? Use MobileMe or a shared server.
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

You can save Keynote in Quicktime.

As well, you export it in html including navigation controls and view in a browser. Why would it be necessary to use iWork? Use MobileMe or a shared server.

Because those solutions, to put it bluntly, don't work.
post #49 of 55
I've never been able to successfully login to iWork.com

I have a valid apple ID, but it doesn't accept it......
post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

You have iWork, I have iWork.

I download your document, work on it, upload it.

You download my document, make changes upload it.

etc...

etc...

That seems reasonably collaborative to me.

I use something called "dropbox"... gives you a few GB of free storage, and you can collaborate on the fly (with some limited lightweight version control)... doc gets updated in a shared folder, everyone sees it at the same time.

Combines local and cloud storage. pretty sweet system...

Not sure how it really compares with this, but it's worth having regardless.... dropbox.com if interested...

they have paid storage too if you need more than a couple of GBs, but so far, I haven't.
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

Because those solutions, to put it bluntly, don't work.

Mine do. And very well.
post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

Mine do. And very well.

Sorry... but they do not work at all.

What my problem is, is that I work with Keynote often - designing presentations for people.
These people need the ability to click and have motion states within slides. Like a list appearing a click at a time, having photo's and info move in while other info moves out etc...

Right now, the ONLY way for them to obtain this control is to give them the actual keynote file. Once they have that, they are free to make all the changes they want forever, updating the presentation endlessly based on my customized framework and templates. They can directly copy info out of the source keynote file (like photo's or art) and import it into Photoshop etc...

There is zero way to protect the source content without taking away control of the presentation. Saving as a quicktime file does not work and the quality is very poor, unless I want to make an 8 terabyte movie file for them that can be projected at their size requirements (which won't work). Besides, the motion states in Quicktime just don't work within a slide, only slide transitions. They are choppy and just crap.

What Keynote needs... and people have been asking for since day 1 - is a packaged player. So you don't have to give your source file to whoever. Powerpoint has the .ppt stand alone player that still allowes presentation control, and also protects the content.

Even if Apple just added a password 'lock' to the file that didn't allow people to make changes or copy content out of it... would be HUGE.
post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

Sorry... but they do not work at all.

What my problem is, is that I work with Keynote often - designing presentations for people.
These people need the ability to click and have motion states within slides. Like a list appearing a click at a time, having photo's and info move in while other info moves out etc...

Right now, the ONLY way for them to obtain this control is to give them the actual keynote file. Once they have that, they are free to make all the changes they want forever, updating the presentation endlessly based on my customized framework and templates. They can directly copy info out of the source keynote file (like photo's or art) and import it into Photoshop etc...

There is zero way to protect the source content without taking away control of the presentation. Saving as a quicktime file does not work and the quality is very poor, unless I want to make an 8 terabyte movie file for them that can be projected at their size requirements (which won't work). Besides, the motion states in Quicktime just don't work within a slide, only slide transitions. They are choppy and just crap.

What Keynote needs... and people have been asking for since day 1 - is a packaged player. So you don't have to give your source file to whoever. Powerpoint has the .ppt stand alone player that still allowes presentation control, and also protects the content.

Even if Apple just added a password 'lock' to the file that didn't allow people to make changes or copy content out of it... would be HUGE.

Interesting. I do a lot of Keynote work, but only for myself, so I hadn't ever considered the scenario you're describing.

One thing: I just opened a .ppt file I had lying around (sent to me by another party), and it appears to give me editing capacity over all the individual elements. Is content protection a toggle on the source end?
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post #54 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

Interesting. I do a lot of Keynote work, but only for myself, so I hadn't ever considered the scenario you're describing.

One thing: I just opened a .ppt file I had lying around (sent to me by another party), and it appears to give me editing capacity over all the individual elements. Is content protection a toggle on the source end?

Hi addabox. Yeah, I had never heard of that issue either, and I use keynote every day (but only for myself).

Poking around in keynote I found a preference to "Save new documents as packages." I wonder if that would help with this issue?
post #55 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BRussell View Post

Hi addabox. Yeah, I had never heard of that issue either, and I use keynote every day (but only for myself).

Poking around in keynote I found a preference to "Save new documents as packages." I wonder if that would help with this issue?

I don't think so. This option seems to do nothing more than create the older-style package files, which are essentially folders disguised as files. You can open and view the contents of these folders with a control click.
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