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Apple to ban film-based screen protectors from company stores - Page 5

post #161 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by popnfresh View Post

I guess that must be why the iPhone's marketshare is declining and Android's is increasing, huh.

Except, you know, not, outside of North America. But you go ahead on seize on the talking point du jour and repeat it as often as possible, as is customary with your peoples.
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post #162 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by knightlie View Post


Only the most rabid fanboy can possibly support this move. At best it's peculiar, at worst it's an example of what is becoming ever more paranoid and bizarre behaviour by Apple. Did a screen-protector salesman take Steve Jobs' parking space or something?

Utter nonsense. Apple know's that we don't need screen protector's because there screen's don't scratch unless you abuse them.
post #163 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by popnfresh View Post

I guess that must be why the iPhone's marketshare is declining and Android's is increasing, huh.

We doesn't care about marketshare. We want Apple to make huge profit's.
post #164 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by oxygenhose View Post

Why would the iPhone be any different? Fantasy land, forum 1-up nonsense.

It's glass. If it doesn't come into contact with things that will scratch it, it won't scratch.
post #165 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous guy View Post

What people don't seem to understand is that experience with scratches and wear is completely different from user to user.

While there's certainly a kernel of truth to that, there's also a rich, chocolatey coating of bull. The material properties of glass are not mysteries yet unplumbed by science. They're well understood. It is physically impossible to scratch a screen with something that's less hard than the screen. When somebody tries to assert something that is contrary not just to common sense but to the laws of physics, it's a stretch to call that a "different user experience."

Unless that "different user" lives in a different universe. Obviously. iPhones are notoriously fragile in the Cowboy Universe.

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Cases and screen protectors wouldn't be such a big iDevice market

Okay, that's twice now you've asserted that these pieces of crap are "a big market" or "popular." The first time I let it slide, because the Internet is not homework and not everything has to be footnoted. But this time I'm calling you on it. Apple sold 8.4 million iPhones in the last quarter. How many of these sticky plastic screen thingies were sold worldwide?

Quote:
Perhaps they should make durability a point of the next iPhone keynote if the device is more resistant to wear.

That's just the thing, though. We're not talking about durability here. These sticky pieces of plastic which are decidedly less durable than the glass to which they're affixed aren't meant to be durable. They're meant to be disposable. It's an ablative shield, designed to fail before the precious, precious screen does. Except that's nonsense, because any contact that would scratch the optical glass screen will tear through the plastic and then damage the screen. Any lesser contact will just tear through the plastic, leaving the screen unscathed and forcing you to buy another disposable plastic thingy.

It's a racket, plain and simple.
post #166 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous guy View Post

What people don't seem to understand is that experience with scratches and wear is completely different from user to user. You may go years with a naked iPhone and barely get so much as a scratch, while others get a scuffed up handheld in two days.

People can present all the empirical data they want on wear and strength of materials, but ultimately data doesn't always explain the inevitable variation on quality from a user to user basis.

OK! YMMV! So it's pretty much a wash!

Quote:
Cases and screen protectors wouldn't be such a big iDevice market if they were notorious for their ability to keep their appearance after daily use. Perhaps they should make durability a point of the next iPhone keynote if the device is more resistant to wear.

Oh wait! iDevice screens suck! If your device doesn't get all scratched up it's just blind luck!

So fanboys need to understand that experiences vary while admitting that, in fact, the default experience is poor. Disagreeing with this, of course, means you're a defensive sheep trying to shout down legitimate criticism, which need not be internally consistent. Fanboys.
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post #167 of 247
Are Apple 'banning' the screen covers or are they no longer stocking / selling them? If it is the latter I would assume it is just a business decision. If a shop sells five of these per day and are unable to get decent mark-up due to competition, and store product real estate is at an absolute premium, the only reasonable decision would be to stop carrying the things. My guess is by far the majority of owners do not use the screen protectors and most that do hunt for deals on the net.
Personally I use nothing and my iPhone is really scratched up (not the glass, though). For me it makes no difference - most screens look great when illuminated and that is all that matters to me.
post #168 of 247
I have never used a screen protector because I know I would screw up applying it.

However not every case is made evenly to protect. There was a case I bought that scratched the back of my 3GS like hell that i noticed after only a couple of days. I searched and found another case that was thinner & padded inside. so buyer beware on any cell phone case make sure it has good protection for the back of your cell phone while using one.

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post #169 of 247
Never used them anyway. There are screen cleaner choices out there. I use one called iKlenz that works to clean fingerprints and smudge that builds up, Yes even on the 3GS anti-oil screen.

In all actuality if the iPhone screen is really, really hard to scratch and you have a great cleaner solution with a microfiber cloth why do you need the screen protector? You have to clean those as well anyway.

Just enjoy the screen and find out what you've probably been missing.
post #170 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomfoolery View Post

While there's certainly a kernel of truth to that, there's also a rich, chocolatey coating of bull. The material properties of glass are not mysteries yet unplumbed by science. They're well understood. It is physically impossible to scratch a screen with something that's less hard than the screen. When somebody tries to assert something that is contrary not just to common sense but to the laws of physics, it's a stretch to call that a "different user experience."

Unless that "different user" lives in a different universe. Obviously. iPhones are notoriously fragile in the Cowboy Universe.

Correct, but your reasoning is flawed. You negate friction, dust, etc. Wax alone has proven over the last XX years to help preserve paint (a much much harder material). If you can keep your screen 100% dust free, etc. you are golden and what you say is true. One speck of 7+ hardness dust in your pocket when you slide it in or dropping it on concrete (which I have done a couple of times) you'll scratch the screen. My plastic has saved my screen every time....
post #171 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by ihxo View Post

the reason's probably supporting these screen protector is creating a lot of unnecessary stress for their support staff. Can you imagine the line of people asking the Apple genius to remove some bubbles from their screen?

Yet Apple has no problem creating service nightmares for Mac technicians by making the iMac so difficult to take apart, even to replace simple components like a hard drive. If Apple cares so much about bubbles on iPhone screens, then shouldn't they also care about fingerprints and dust behind their iMac screens?
post #172 of 247
Someone I know put a screen protector on her iTouch. Touch screen stopped working reliably, she thought it was broke. Removed the protector and all was fine.

I can easily imagine that Apple has to deal with this all the time, and decided to just stop selling the things. At least now when people come in with "my touch screen is dead" problems they can't say "Well you sold me the protector!"

It's all too silly though. If you want one (I use one on my iPhone), get it online.
post #173 of 247
I use the iSkin Revo 2 as it's the only case I've found that has silicone attached to the case the "folds" into the earphone jack and the dock. It comes with a hard, removable piece of plastic that fits over the outside of the case to protect the screen (I don;t use it, but it came with it.) The case itself is silicone, and the only thing I have done to it is cut a hole by the main speaker (where you listen to phone conversations) because the silicone was messing up the accelerometer sensors.
On the screen itself I've always used Power Support's Anti-Glare Film, http://store.apple.com/us/product/TS...co=MTM4NzY2NTY
it's the best by far, and it isn't cheap. One lasts literally as long as your phone will last.

My 3G iPhone still looks brand new. Maybe the people who rock their iPhones bareback are right, you don't need protection. I haven't had any problems with my iPhone getting scratched using what I've mentioned, so I'm going to stick with it for all my future iPhones as well. If you can keep your phone pristine without spending the $40-50 on the protection, good for you. I somehow doubt I could, though.
post #174 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Your ignorance is blatant. Apple has never "listened" to their customers. Neither does Ferrari.
They just make what they think are really, really awesome products. If you don't like them; just move on to something you do like. It's that simple, and it always has been.
It's laughable you don't realize this.

Thanks for confirming that all of Apple's feedback and bug reporting links are useless:

http://www.apple.com/feedback/

http://developer.apple.com/bugreporter/

Would you care to explain why those links are even there? Is it just to provide an illusion of caring, when in fact, anything sent to those links just goes into a black hole?

And what about Apple fans who respond to criticism by just saying "Send feedback"? Wouldn't that just be a useless response since Apple is not going to listen anyway?
post #175 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroturf1 View Post

One speck of 7+ hardness dust in your pocket when you slide it in or dropping it on concrete (which I have done a couple of times) you'll scratch the screen.

Okay, good point. Under ideal (or I guess nightmarish) circumstances, it would definitely be possible to scratch the glass this way. But let's be reasonable. That's not dust you're talking about. That's sand. And you'd have to put some serious force against the screen to get a bit of sand to scratch it. Totally not impossible, but well, I think you'd have to be wearing some pretty tight jeans.

Can we at least agree that glass is hard, and will not be scratched by things like pocket lint or unclean thoughts? Because unbelievably, there seems to be some debate on that point.
post #176 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

It's glass. If it doesn't come into contact with things that will scratch it, it won't scratch.

Thank you - Precisely. Now try and avoid things that scratch it.
Now try and defend the logic that scratch resistant products are a fraud.

It's bozos who think that when Apple does anything,
there's a vast conspiracy or unusual reason for doing so.

If it's retail, stock space, cost and profit - first.
UFOs just don't exist.
post #177 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by oxygenhose View Post

Thank you - Precisely. Now try and avoid things that scratch it.

It's pretty simple. Just take care of your things. No contact with anything metallic. No putting it face down on tables, etc.

The screen should remain pristine for the life of the phone, no problem.
post #178 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomfoolery View Post

While there's certainly a kernel of truth to that, there's also a rich, chocolatey coating of bull. The material properties of glass are not mysteries yet unplumbed by science. They're well understood. It is physically impossible to scratch a screen with something that's less hard than the screen. When somebody tries to assert something that is contrary not just to common sense but to the laws of physics, it's a stretch to call that a "different user experience."

Welcome to science class buddy! - the dirt, sand and dust particles in your pocket, purse... well in fact everywhere on this rock inhabited by moronic apes, is the same material as glass and 'hard' enough to scratch it. Duh. Obviously you're only sportin' the gas station cheapo sunglasses with plastic lenses. You don't deal with glass very much do you? You can in fact scratch it with your fingernail, a piece of plastic, etc.

Quote:
Unless that "different user" lives in a different universe. Obviously. iPhones are notoriously fragile in the Cowboy Universe.

I think you're over estimating your grasp of both this and the 'cowboy universe' and it's inner workings. Obviously you're never 'played catch' - the cork and leather is not as hard as "glass" but it will 'scratch it' pretty damn well. Seriously do you people just make this crap up? What kind of hole do people live in?

Quote:
Okay, that's twice now you've asserted that these pieces of crap are "a big market" or "popular." The first time I let it slide, because the Internet is not homework and not everything has to be footnoted. But this time I'm calling you on it. Apple sold 8.4 million iPhones in the last quarter. How many of these sticky plastic screen thingies were sold worldwide?

Before you move on to economics, just a suggestion, might want to take some refreshers on science.

Quote:
That's just the thing, though. We're not talking about durability here. These sticky pieces of plastic which are decidedly less durable than the glass to which they're affixed aren't meant to be durable. They're meant to be disposable. It's an ablative shield, designed to fail before the precious, precious screen does. Except that's nonsense, because any contact that would scratch the optical glass screen will tear through the plastic and then damage the screen. Any lesser contact will just tear through the plastic, leaving the screen unscathed and forcing you to buy another disposable plastic thingy.

It's a racket, plain and simple.

Bozo, would take a lot for your keys to 'tear thru the plastic'. Alone, they'll scratch your phone glass pretty fast, and they inhabit most of the same compartments and pockets as iPhones.

Don't buy one, but your arguement is pathetic.
post #179 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by oxygenhose View Post

Now try and defend the logic that scratch resistant products are a fraud.

Okie doke, I'll give it a shot.

Let us start with two fundamental assumptions. First assumption: Anything that can scratch glass much necessarily be harder than glass. Fair enough?

Second assumption: Mere contact between glass and something harder than glass is insufficient to create a scratch. There must be some minimal amount of pressure applied, along with a force parallel to the surface of the glass. In other words, you have to push the things together and slide. Common sense, yeah?

Now. Imagine that you have a piece of the same optical glass used in iPhone screens, and also something hard enough to scratch it. Since optical glass has a Mohs hardness of six-and-a-half-ish, we're looking for something with a hardness of seven or more. Just to be on the safe side, let's go with tungsten carbide. That's ridiculously hard, with a Mohs rating of 9.

Now apply the tungsten carbide drill bit to the glass. Apply sufficient parallel and perpendicular forces to make a scratch. Write down the values of the parallel and perpendicular force components in your copybook.

Now apply one of these plasticky sheety things to the glass. Apply the drill bit again, using the same force we used before.

What happens? By gosh and by gum, the drill bit went right through the plastic like it wasn't even there. Seems like the plastic did absolutely no good whatsoever. Because, see, an object hard enough to scratch glass, applied with sufficient force to scratch glass, isn't going to be all that impressed by a piece of sellotape.

On the other hand, if we bring the drill bit and the plastic-wrapped glass together with sufficiently small force that it doesn't puncture the plastic, then we're not using nearly enough force to scratch the glass. So the "protection" the plastic provided was, in fact, useless.

That's the logic in a nutshell. Any contact with a sufficiently hard object, applied with enough force to be able to scratch the glass, will destroy the plastic. And any contact that's not sufficiently forceful to destroy the plastic cannot (by virtue of the plastic being softer) scratch the glass. In between, we have a whole set of possible contact scenarios where the plastic is damaged or destroyed but the glass remains unharmed, because glass is harder than plastic.

How's that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by oxygenhose View Post

Welcome to science class buddy! - the dirt, sand and dust particles in your pocket, purse... well in fact everywhere on this rock inhabited by moronic apes, is the same material as glass and 'hard' enough to scratch it. Duh.

Sorry, but that's untrue. If that were correct, then charcoal briquettes would be just as hard as diamonds, since they're both allotropes of pure carbon.

I think this is the part where I'm supposed to say "duh," but instead I'll just elaborate, 'cause I'm that kind of guy. See, chemical composition does not determine material hardness. That comes down to molecular structure. Diamond is harder than charcoal because it's got a different molecular structure. While you can find particles that can scratch glass — quartz sand, for example — that's not the same as saying that everything everywhere can scratch glass.

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You don't deal with glass very much do you? You can in fact scratch it with your fingernail, a piece of plastic, etc.

See, that's what we in the business call — and I'm sorry to jargon this up — "wrong." When you rub a softer thing against a harder thing, it's the softer thing that deforms.

Quote:
Obviously you're never 'played catch' - the cork and leather is not as hard as "glass" but it will 'scratch it' pretty damn well.

You've completely lost me, I'm afraid. Are you talking about throwing a baseball through a window? You know that scratching glass and cracking or shattering it are two entirely different physical processes, yeah?

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Before you move on to economics, just a suggestion, might want to take some refreshers on science.

Perhaps you're right.

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Bozo, would take a lot for your keys to 'tear thru the plastic'. Alone, they'll scratch your phone glass pretty fast…

Give it a try. Take your house key and a glass from the cupboard. See if you can scratch the glass with your house key. Consider it a refresher course in science, right in your own home.

For those of you who don't want to follow along at home, I'll give the answer away. The kind of glass used to make things like window panes and drinking glasses has a hardness of around five and a half. Brass, which is the metal most keys are made of, has a hardness of around three and a half. You cannot scratch glass with brass. You can scratch that kind of glass with a high-carbon steel knife, which has a hardness that approaches six, but it's very difficult. You're more likely to break the glass or cut yourself if you're not very careful, because of the amount of force required.

Optical glass is harder than household glass. It's very, as the phrase goes, scratch-resistant.
post #180 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

this despite widespread reports of scratches appearing quite easily on its handheld offerings for years.


Apple device screens are among the most durable and scratch-resistant you'll ever find. There's no actual need for any screen protection.

When I dropped my phone and shattered the screen, the protector kept the glass from going everywhere and allowed me to keep using the phone till I could take it in to get it fixed.
post #181 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

When I dropped my phone and shattered the screen, the protector kept the glass from going everywhere and allowed me to keep using the phone till I could take it in to get it fixed.

Dropping things that have a glass surface is a bad idea anyway. The solution is not the screen protector, but rather, not dropping your iPhone (d'oh!) in first place.

So clean up your mess and send the iPhone in for repairs. Or pay $20 for the sheet and send your iPhone in for repairs.

I'll save my $20 for some neat-o apps, thank you.
post #182 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by isaidso View Post

Your ignorance is blatant. Apple has never "listened" to their customers. Neither does Ferrari.
They just make what they think are really, really awesome products. If you don't like them; just move on to something you do like. It's that simple, and it always has been.
It's laughable you don't realize this.

That is ridiculous. Just because a company has a tightly defined vision and does not design its product by committee it doesn't mean the company does not 'listen' to its customers. I think you are romanticizing the non-compromising single mindedness of Apple (and Ferrari). I guarantee you they both listen very carefully to their customers.
post #183 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Dropping things that have a glass surface is a bad idea anyway.

Assuming people chose to drop expensive electronics. I'm not sure how you're going to find people that do that.
post #184 of 247
Who cares who Apple listens to?

They make great stuff that make people drool. If that's "not listening", fine by me. I won't say a damn thing, just keep the good stuff coming.

Apple is not known to do things by focus groups anyway. I think SJ or someone else in the organization admitted to this in the past. Either way is fine by me. Their method, whatever it is, has worked for over a decade now. I don't really mind if they keep it up.
post #185 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Assuming people chose to drop expensive electronics. I'm not sure how you're going to find people that do that.

I think it's safe to assume that these things get dropped by accident.

In that case, you might just be SOL. Nothing you can do about that. Bad karma or something . . .
post #186 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by masternav View Post

Devices like the iPhone, iPod Touch (and now the iPod nano screen) use tempered optical glass, which has a Mohs hardness scale rating of 7-8, which puts it into the same class as quartz, but below Topaz, and of course diamond. Regular glass is down around 3-5 Mohs, mild steel is usually around 4-5 Mohs and hardened (carbonized) steel is around 7-8 Mohs. So for the screen to scratch you had to have it come into contact with something that was higher on the Mohs scale than the screen. Usually that's a diamond ring, an emery board, or some kind of mineral or other. I repeatedly take out my small pocket knife which has stainless steel fittings and rub it back and forth across my 1st gen screen to show how tough the screen is. NOTE: do not do this to your later models with the oleophobic coating - for some reason the coating makes the scratches more obvious than on the plain glass of the 1st gen..

Most keys are made out of a form of brass - which is lower on the Mohs scale than steel, so it categorically wasn't the keys that scratched the screen. It could have been the steel in the keyring, or something else, but most definitely not the keys.

I do have a friend who is one of those folks who insists on squeezing the phone with her shoulder against her ear, which is ok - except she wears diamond earrings, which put a series of small but visible scratches in her screen. I recommended she put a film on to put a sacrificial layer between the diamond and the glass. Since the plastic film is resilient and therefore less prone to scratching by the diamonds, it works fine.

So if you get sand in your pocket, drop it outside where there is a wide mix of minerals to contact - chances are good you will find something that will scratch the screen if you don't keep it clean and debris-free.

As for drinking the koolaid, try this on for size. Apple gets to decide what they think is best for their products and what third party products they want in their stores. You as a consumer get to decide what is best for your use of that product - but that doesn't mean that Apple has to meet your every whim or expectation simply because you want something that they choose to not stock in their stores. Seriously. What a ridiculous response.

Thanks for that informative and well reasoned posting.
post #187 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomfoolery View Post

Okie doke, I'll give it a shot.

Let us start with two fundamental assumptions. First assumption: Anything that can scratch glass much necessarily be harder than glass. Fair enough?

Second assumption: Mere contact between glass and something harder than glass is insufficient to create a scratch. There must be some minimal amount of pressure applied, along with a force parallel to the surface of the glass. In other words, you have to push the things together and slide. Common sense, yeah?

Now. Imagine that you have a piece of the same optical glass used in iPhone screens, and also something hard enough to scratch it. Since optical glass has a Mohs hardness of six-and-a-half-ish, we're looking for something with a hardness of seven or more. Just to be on the safe side, let's go with tungsten carbide. That's ridiculously hard, with a Mohs rating of 9.

Now apply the tungsten carbide drill bit to the glass. Apply sufficient parallel and perpendicular forces to make a scratch. Write down the values of the parallel and perpendicular force components in your copybook.

Now apply one of these plasticky sheety things to the glass. Apply the drill bit again, using the same force we used before.

What happens? By gosh and by gum, the drill bit went right through the plastic like it wasn't even there. Seems like the plastic did absolutely no good whatsoever. Because, see, an object hard enough to scratch glass, applied with sufficient force to scratch glass, isn't going to be all that impressed by a piece of sellotape.

Unfortunately, this mental exercise didn't hold up for me. I tried it, tungsten carbide and aluminum oxide both scratch the glass at much less pressure than is required to penetrate a thin piece of clear plastic.
post #188 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Unfortunately, this mental exercise didn't hold up for me. I tried it, tungsten carbide and aluminum oxide both scratch the glass at much less pressure than is required to penetrate a thin piece of clear plastic.

If you really did try it, then respect, man. Mad respect.
post #189 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tomfoolery View Post

If you really did try it, then respect, man. Mad respect.

Only on the edges, the black face, I can't risk ruining the main display just yet, but it's an original 3G, probably going to be replace by whatever follows the 3GS this summer.

The scratches weren't deep though by themselves, but if scuffs built up over time, then it might add up. For what it's worth, I don't use plastic screen protectors, the problem had nothing to do with the protection, but being too easy to peel. And the main issue about Apple no longer offering them, that's fine, anyone that decides they must have it can still get them from any number of store chains and web sites.

I might play with other materials, maybe a bit of soil, which may hold hard grains that might be found in a pocket.
post #190 of 247
My first touch did not have a screen protector and lasted for a while

My current touch is pretty scratched up, and I had to buy a protector in order to prevent an increase in scratches. Thank god apple does not control the protector market for their devices or i would have been screwed.

For those who are saying that the screens don't need protecting, they do. Besides some people buy anti glare so they can read their screen if they happen to venture outside. Not sure why apple would want to remove it from their stores, but I have a hunch people will keep buying screen protectors from other places.
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post #191 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Only on the edges, the black face, I can't risk ruining the main display just yet, but it's an original 3G, probably going to be replace by whatever follows the 3GS this summer.

The scratches weren't deep though by themselves, but if scuffs built up over time, then it might add up. For what it's worth, I don't use plastic screen protectors, the problem had nothing to do with the protection, but being too easy to peel. And the main issue about Apple no longer offering them, that's fine, anyone that decides they must have it can still get them from any number of store chains and web sites.

I might play with other materials, maybe a bit of soil, which may hold hard grains that might be found in a pocket.

Very interesting. Ballsy.
post #192 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

this despite widespread reports of scratches appearing quite easily on its handheld offerings for years.


Apple device screens are among the most durable and scratch-resistant you'll ever find. There's no actual need for any screen protection.

As for the ban, screen protection kind of defeats the purpose of oleophobic coatings, and does send the message that Apple's screens are in need of protection.

I've stopped using plastic screen protectors for my iPhone long ago, preferring a nice, thin, plastic/transparent backing. Works great.

Further, you can get your screen protectors elsewhere, just not in Apple Stores. No big deal.

The other big factor that no one has mentioned is that these screen protectors interfere with multi-touch. So they could be leading to greater support costs for Apple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Are Apple 'banning' the screen covers or are they no longer stocking / selling them? If it is the latter I would assume it is just a business decision.

It is the latter. Apple isn't banning anything - just not selling them in their stores. I don't see what all the whining is about.
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post #193 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by gin_tonic View Post

They do need. iPod Touch doesn't have any oleophobic coating

not at the moment, but perhaps the next gen will.

From what I've seen of the report, this news is coming from smaller companies. not from say Power Support who provides like 80% of the items in question. So this leak could be nothing more than bitterness by folks that wanted their stuff sold in stores but Apple said no. perhaps due to quality issues, or an exclusive contract with Power Support or perhaps they are cutting the items due to other issues like wanting to use that space for something that will get them more profit. Heck I was in one of my locals today and wondering where the heck they were going to put all the ipad stuff. they are going to have to cut back something if they plan to floor anything, even their own stuff

Quote:
Originally Posted by Motlee View Post

IMO, this ban is due to iPod/iPhone replacements/repairs done by Apple under warranty.
You put that film on there and then need a repair done where Apple ends up replacing the device, then you have a consumer trying to get Apple to replace his/her protective film as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dogcow View Post

This may be because when people buy these they made the employees put them on. If the employee messes up who's responsible?

Probably not the reasons, but yes they are added benefits.


Quote:
Originally Posted by popnfresh View Post

More and more, Apple seems to be ignoring what people want in favor of what Steve Jobs is convinced they should want--Flash on the iPhone/Touch/iPad, user-replaceable batteries, support for more audio and video codecs. And now this.

More like some folks have a knee jerk reaction to anything that isn't how they would do it.

Flash is not compatible with touch screens. Even Adobe admits this. Not to mention the ungoing crashing etc with Flash and the Mac OS (which the phone os is based on)
removing the housing that makes batteries removable allows for larger batteries and honestly how much trouble is it to go every 3-5 years to have your battery replaced at the same cost you were spending every 12-14 months
and so on

Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox View Post

"Won't accept Diner's Club cards for purchases?"

Actually for a while very few US companies did. because the transaction fees were insanely high. Now that DC is owned by Mastercard, there's no issue
post #194 of 247
THE non-glare Power support is absolutely essential when viewing outdoors and the screen is actually more responsive via touch with it on. This just seems like part of Apple's infamous planned obsolescence- like when they used to push older iPods as gym and running companions knowing full well how easily those hard drives would break. They don't make all that money with a 10% market share unless it has turnover upon turnover.
This is really sad as Power Support would have made a ton of money off iPad screen protector sales.
Not nice Apple.
post #195 of 247
Bottom line, Apple does not want people placing anything on their iPads that could possibly affect the precision and respsonsiveness of its new Multi-Touch screen.

Quote:
Multi-Touch
The Multi-Touch screen on iPad is based on the same revolutionary technology on iPhone. But the technology has been completely reengineered for the larger iPad surface, making it extremely precise and responsive. So whether youre zooming in on a map, flicking through your photos, or deleting an email, iPad responds with incredible accuracy. And it does just what you want it to. http://www.apple.com/ipad/design/

And has been evidenced on other touch-screen devices, e.g., http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcfcqeVGsfE
post #196 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Dropping things that have a glass surface is a bad idea anyway. The solution is not the screen protector, but rather, not dropping your iPhone (d'oh!) in first place.

So clean up your mess and send the iPhone in for repairs. Or pay $20 for the sheet and send your iPhone in for repairs.

I'll save my $20 for some neat-o apps, thank you.

Accidents happen.
post #197 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

Bottom line, Apple does not want people placing anything on their iPads that could possibly affect the precision and respsonsiveness of its new Multi-Touch screen.



And has been evidenced on other touch-screen devices, e.g., http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcfcqeVGsfE

Steve Jobs only wants you to use it RAW?
post #198 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by TECHSTUD View Post

Steve Jobs only wants you to use it RAW?

Another of your alts?
post #199 of 247
Very odd to suggest screens on a *tempered glass* screen "scratch easily." Have you tried no screen protector yet?
I've never had one on my 1st Gen iPod Touch. Just checked again and there are NO SCRATCHES on the screen.
Might wanna do a test review next time, before swallowing rumors from accessory manufacturers.
post #200 of 247
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeff94svx View Post

Very odd to suggest screens on a *tempered glass* screen "scratch easily." Have you tried no screen protector yet?
I've never had one on my 1st Gen iPod Touch. Just checked again and there are NO SCRATCHES on the screen.
Might wanna do a test review next time, before swallowing rumors from accessory manufacturers.

Many of us use them primarily to avoid GLARE. Scratch resistance is an added feature- that's all.
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