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O Brother Where Art Thou!!

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Gotta sa I was surprised by that. I was sure it was either going to be Bob Dylan or U2 for album of the year.

U2 won 4 others though. But lost best rock song to train even though they had 2 songs in that category <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />

7 total grammies for All That You Can't Leave Behind

Good for allison krauss and the others on the soundtrack though. they deserve it.

BTW, Dylan rocked tonight. Larry plays a mean slide guitar


edit:he he. i'm tired

[ 02-28-2002: Message edited by: applenut ]</p>
post #2 of 20
I thought it was pretty sweet that Oh Brother got the grammy. You know that *none* of the artists on that record ever dreamed of getting one.
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post #3 of 20
The stigma isn't just from Deliverance, but it's all around us. Charleston SC is a world unto itself, by the way. As is New Orleans and most other Southern port towns. I'd venture that you couldn't FIND a decent bluegrass place in Charleston (maybe Summerville or up the rivah a little ways).

Also, for those of you traveling through Columbia SC (my former home) you should check out Bill's Picking Parlor (just across the river from downtown). They have a bluegrass jam about every two weeks, and it's awesome. Some big names come through there to hobnob.

And I was shocked to see that OBWAT soundtrack was on the top rated album list for 2001 as well. I think they released the movie extra early so that it could be considered for Oscars last year (2000).
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post #4 of 20
Thou not though.

Anyway, the CD is great and the movie was great. If you haven't seen it yet, you should. I'm not anywhere close to a bluegrass/country fan and I love the music from that movie. That's what good music should be about... making me of all people listen to country willingly.
post #5 of 20
The stigma is from anything associated with white Southern culture, pretty much.

And it being seen, right or wrong, from everyone else in the country as the bottom of the barrel and not deserving of the respect or attention given jazz, blues, rap, alternative, etc.

And I'm quite certain that, to many anyway, it's somehow tied to racism and any and all bad things linked to the South and hillbilly/mountain culture or history.



I wouldn't expect some NYC music writer from the Village or wherever to give much thought or attention to this style. Afterall, it's probably seen as "Cousin courtin' soundtrack music".



The cards are stacked, it seems.

I was genuinely shocked that Ralph Stanley got the applause he got last night: croaky-voiced, a bit off key in places, etc.

Had that been some equally old and feeble blues guy, the joint would've given themselves head rushes given standing ovations.

As it was, it was some old hillbilly in Shaq's house and I doubt many people there gave a damn.
post #6 of 20
"O Brother..." is a great album, but "Love & Theft" is by far the better of the two. O Brother looks back, Bob never does. He just is.

I'm actually glad Bob lost for Best Folk Vocal. It would be insulting to give Bob a genre award in my opinion.

What did he play? "Cry A While"?
post #7 of 20
[quote]Originally posted by Artman @_@:
<strong>First off, loved the movie and the soundtrack!

One Grammy question though...

The film was released October 2000. I would believe the soundtrack would be released the same time (sometimes before the movie's release). To put it bluntly...how did this get nominated for a 2001 album of the year? Must have been a tight squeeze...

I didn't see the Grammys last night. And this irks me about other awards shows. Nominating films before they are released and nominating albums that are in fact two years old.

Not trying to spoil anything here. I think they should have won in 2001? <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" /> </strong><hr></blockquote>

The Grammy eligibility year is not the same as the calendar year. In fact, I think the Grammy year starts October 1 or November 1. That's how U2 was able to swing Grammys of the same album for two years in a row and how Outkast won Grammys for Stankonia, even though it, too, came out in late 2000.

The Oscar year is pretty much the calendar year. Of course, the Academy only requires the film to have public screenings in New York and Los Angeles to be eligible, so unless you live there, you might have to wait until February to see the nominated films.
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27" 3.06 GHz iMac

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post #8 of 20
Actually, Dylan won Contemporary Folk Album for "Love and Theft".

The fact that Dylan got beat, though, was outrageous. Of course, I couldn't believe most of the awards that were given out last night- early on, I knew things were not going well. <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />
post #9 of 20
The soundtrack to "O Brother..." is incredible. And it's funny to suddenly see and hear about people sitting up to take notice of a musical form that's as valid, passionate and deserving as blues, jazz, Latin, etc.

[climb on top of soapbox]
That whole "Deliverance" thing that's saddled bluegrass/mountain/Appalachian/whatever music is unfortunate.

I'm convinced that if some of the hipster types out there could get past that and open their ears as much to that kind of music as they seem willing and able to do for everything other kind, they'd be quite impressed and moved by some of the best practitioners of the style.

I grew up on that stuff, so maybe I'm a little closer or accepting of it than others around here, but like I was saying in a thread the other day (talking about Johnny Cash): this stuff has ALWAYS been cool.

It's not like bluegrass or mountain music suddenly got good and now everyone "gets it". Quite the opposite: people were probably genuinely surprised and moved by something sounding so real and earthy, in this era of pre-fab pop and trendy, flash-in-the-pan type of music business.

The music is the same...it's all of YOU who've come around.



To me, it's white man's hillbilly blues...just as mournful, real and heartbreaking as any black blues artist or song. Just a different sound, that's all.

Open your ears, open your mind.

"O Brother..." just scratches the surface. Seek out Bill Monroe, the Stanley Brothers (Ralph Stanley was the old guy who sang "O Death" last night). At the very least, for a newer slant, check out Alison Krauss and her kick-ass band, as well as Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder (his bluegrass band), who has put out INCREDIBLE bluegrass albums lately.

The musicianship and soul is there.

[/steps off soapbox]

post #10 of 20
I was glad to see the "O Brother..." soundtrack tied at number 8 for album sales last year (according to USA Today, from someone else).

Unfortunately, I think the movie was a great big swipe at Southern folks. Imagine, if you would, that the Coen brothers had made a movie such as "Friday" or "Do the Right Thing." I don't think it would be so well-received as a movie mocking Southerners.

Don't get me wrong -- I loved the movie. Pure genius. But it made serious fun of poor people in the South, which appears to be some kind of sport these days among folks who are less than a generation removed from what they refer to as "white trash."

Anyhow, the soundtrack is awesome. The live album that came out afterwards "Down from the Mountain" is not as good, and it DOESN'T include "Man of Constant Sorrow" for some reason. Strange.
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post #11 of 20
[QUOTE]Originally posted by pscates:
[climb on top of soapbox]
That whole "Deliverance" thing that's saddled bluegrass/mountain/Appalachian/whatever music is unfortunate.

I can nor will I ever be able to stomach country, folk, bluegrass whatever you want to call it, and I am from the deep south (charleston, s.c.). Yes the "Deliverance" stigma has and will always be attatched to this music because people tend to believe that we southeners all have sex with our relatives and drive crappy pickup trucks with gun racks in the back window. I say to each his own and freedom of choice to whatever music turns you on, I have been an outcast by many of my southern friends because I refuse to listen to this music, I just do not care for that sound. I have a broad spectrum of musical taste from Grover Washington Jr. to Zep but no " hillbillybobbyjoshit4me". <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" /> I will be chastised once again for dissing my heritage but wtf..
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post #12 of 20
First off, loved the movie and the soundtrack!

One Grammy question though...

The film was released October 2000. I would believe the soundtrack would be released the same time (sometimes before the movie's release). To put it bluntly...how did this get nominated for a 2001 album of the year? Must have been a tight squeeze...

I didn't see the Grammys last night. And this irks me about other awards shows. Nominating films before they are released and nominating albums that are in fact two years old.

Not trying to spoil anything here. I think they should have won in 2001? <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />
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post #13 of 20
Hey, if you have legitimate reasons (and you've lived a life surrounded by it and you genuinely have no love for it), fine. You're not the problem or who I'm talking about.

I'm talking about people who've NEVER listened or heard it and are going ONLY by appearances, stereotypes and assumptions.

Those are the ones who annoy me. If you've given it an honest shake and simply don't care for it, fine.

post #14 of 20
Oh. The whole calendar thing is screwy.

I'm glad, though, that the folks on the OBWAT soundtrack are getting some recognition. For some of them, it's about time.

AND...I personally feel that sleeping with one's cousin is underappreciated, down South and elsewhere.
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post #15 of 20
first...frankly, when did charleston become "deep south?" charleston is yankee...more so than even savannah, which is a white bread town if i've ever seen one.

at any rate, as someone who actually is from the the same general area OBWAT was set in, I didn't really see the movie as making fun of southerners. most of my friends loved it as much as I did. maybe there's something there and we just didn't catch it because we're slow southerners, though.

at any rate, great movie and great soundtrack. totally deserved, yet totally unexpected.

[ 03-01-2002: Message edited by: poor taylor ]</p>
post #16 of 20
[QUOTE]Originally posted by poor taylor:
[QB]first...frankly, when did charleston become "deep south?" charleston is yankee...more so than even savannah, which is a white bread town if i've ever seen one.

Even though this is off the given topic..what exactly is the term "white bread town" making reference to? And yankee is and always has been a term used to describe anyone or anyplace that resides above the southern state of Virginia, as a historical reference.
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post #17 of 20
I coudlnt beleive that Alecia Keys won anything. Of course I also couldnt beleive that Train - Drops of Jupiter was this year, I thought it was form the 80s...

As for OBWAT, it was a GREAT movie, and a GREAT soundtrack, Im glad it got recognition. Yes Dylan is great too, but he doesnt need any more awards everyone knows that hes the best.
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post #18 of 20
Yes, I'm kinda lost on the whole Alicia Keys thing, myself. Very pretty, seems to be a good musician. An okay singer...but I've certainly heard better.

Just one of those things, I guess. The right combination of looks, marketing, talent, timing, etc. that make some people huge stars and make others "coulda-beens".

She ain't no Diana Krall...



[ 03-01-2002: Message edited by: pscates ]</p>
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by pscates:
<strong>Yes, I'm kinda lost on the whole Alicia Keys thing, myself. Very pretty, seems to be a good musician. Okay singer...I've heard better.

Just one of those things, I guess? Right combination of looks, marketing, talent, timing, etc. that make some people huge and make others "coulda-beens".

She ain't no Diana Krall...

</strong><hr></blockquote>


HA. Funny you say that. For one of the awards Alicia Keys got Diana Krall presented it to her. And while Krall was standing behind her while she was giving her "speech" I was just thinking to myself how insane it is that they had a 10X better singer/pianist than the winner standing right behind her
post #20 of 20


See?!?!
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