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CBS tests HTML 5 video for compatibility with Apple iPad

post #1 of 57
Thread Starter 
CBS.com is currently testing HTML5 video playback for streaming episodes of its TV shows, signaling that the major U.S. broadcast network aims to be iPad compatible before Apple's new multimedia device launches.

As discovered by MacRumors, accessing "iPad - test" video links accidentally posted by CBS through the iPad simulator, or when spoofing a browser's "user agent" setting, loads a new page that appears to be set up for HTML5 streaming video. The same links take users to the Adobe Flash page when accessed with a traditional browser.

"This new version of the video does not yet work but appears to be based on HTML5," the report said. "The css files reference HTML5 and have a number of 'webkit' specific calls. Webkit is the browser engine used in the iPad's mobile safari. While the videos don't currently play, the 'fullscreen mode' reportedly already works in the iPad simulator."

That CBS would be eager to find compatibility with the iPad should come as no surprise -- the network was on board with Apple's proposal for a TV subscription deal while other networks were wary. The network has also suggested it will lower prices of some TV shows on iTunes to 99 cents, down from the current standard of $1.99.

In February, it was rumored that Hulu, an online streaming video destination for multiple networks, plans to make its videos available without Flash for the iPad platform. Reports then alleged that the Web site could be prepared by the time the iPad launches April 3, though it was said the service would likely be subscription only.

CBS iPad test page, screenshot credit MacRumors.

In January, Google added support for HTML5 in YouTube, the Web's most popular streaming video destination. Allegedly labeled a "CPU hog" by Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, Adobe Flash has been a target of Apple, which has not allowed the Web standard on its iPhone OS, including the forthcoming iPad.

For more on Apple and Flash, and why the Web format will likely never be available on the iPhone OS, read AppleInsider's three-part Flash Wars series.
post #2 of 57
iPad or not, this is a good thing.
post #3 of 57
"Adobe Flash has been a target of Apple, which has not allowed the Web standard "

Flash is a popular <b>plugin</b>, but is in no way a web standard. Ubiquitous is one thing, but it's not a standard. See: http://www.w3.org/


Sheldon
post #4 of 57
Why would HTML5 hulu be a paid subscription? I think it is possible to put ads into HTML5 vids, no? Or is the whole site transitioning to subscription now, as has been rumored for a while now?
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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post #5 of 57
Test? I thought it just worked.

And BTW Flash is the web standard for motion:
http://www.webstandards.org/2006/08/...ium-and-water/
post #6 of 57
You guys know what will happen here right? Eventually, most movies, TV shows, and major newspapers and magazines will disappear from the web and will just be available through closed systems like the iPad. Yes, that's too bad but pirating and the difficulty of monetizing print-based media on the web are driving it.

I'm resigned to it. To ease my pain, I just by Apple stock so at least I get some pecuniary consolation.
post #7 of 57
Flash is dying; get used to it Techwimp.
post #8 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Why would HTML5 hulu be a paid subscription? I think it is possible to put ads into HTML5 vids, no? Or is the whole site transitioning to subscription now, as has been rumored for a while now?

By the end of Calendar 2010, and likely beginning with the iPad.
post #9 of 57
The writing's on the wall. Thanks (at least in part) to the iPad.

Apple's clout is nothing short of amazing, though.
post #10 of 57
I did not read the article, but why must this be tied to the iPad? WebKit is used by Safari (available on Mac and Windows), Google's Chrome, Android, the iPhone. HTML5 is well supported by Firefox.

Couldn't this just be CBS moving to HTML5 to support every browser except IE?

- Jasen.
post #11 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TECHSTUD View Post

Test? I thought it just worked.

And BTW Flash is the web standard for motion:
http://www.webstandards.org/2006/08/...ium-and-water/

Being the standard does not necessarily mean the best. See MS Windows.
post #12 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

This move had nothing to do with any clout that Apple has or that Flash is dying. CBS and others are attempting to sell media anyway they can and if Apple will not allow Flash they will simply code to their content to run via HTML5.

This is an Apple driven issue not an Adobe issue. The problem is an OSX issue not a Flash 10.1, the problem is people here that spout off about it simply regurgitate anything Steve Jobs says rather then attempting to understand how technology currently works.

Let use an example even someone like Quadra can understand yet still won't accept.

We can all agree that Safari is owned , supported and coded by Apple. When streaming video via Safari on OSX using Flash 10.1 CPU utilization has been tested at 32.07

Take the same version of Safari for Windows run the stream the same content using Flash 10.1 and the CPU utilization is 7.43%!!!!!!!!

WOW how could that be seeing Flash is a CPU hog?

The issue is Apple is too stupid to give Adobe the information they need to allow Flash to use hardware acceleration via OSX. By allowing access to the correct API's this allows the stress to be taken off the CPU and allows the GPU to render a good bit of the processing needed to stress Flash web content.

The problem is Steve Jobs has an agenda and his isn't allowing Flash to become more efficient on OSX.

So instead of being like many of the other sheep here try and educate yourself on how this really works and come to grips with the fact that Steve Jobs is the issue not Adobe or Flash.

Which by the way has little to no impact on the rest of the world that runs Windows so Flash isn't going anywhere anytime soon.



yes but what you don't know is that flash in windows has gpu acceleration enabled, OSX and linux doesn't
post #13 of 57
The fans on PC laptops also go crazy using Flash. Flash has it's time and served it's purpose well, but the world is moving on.

Imagine a drawing app in your browser that doesn't make your fans sounds like an F1 car?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #14 of 57
This just goes to show that Apple is the most powerful tech company on the planet. They can change the practices of major corporations, and most importantly, they do so NOT by what they do, but by what they DON'T do.

And here, Apple will not support Flash.

So we see every major website in the world rejecting Flash, one after another, faster and faster, based upon their desire to have us Apple users view there site.

Every website wants us. All websites will move away from Flash. The juggernaught continues.
post #15 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

By the end of Calendar 2010, and likely beginning with the iPad.

It is happening MUCH faster than that.

Very quickly, Flash will die a messy death. Probably within the next calendar quarter.
post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleRulez View Post

This just goes to show that Apple is the most powerful tech company on the planet. They can change the practices of major corporations, and most importantly, they do so NOT by what they do, but by what they DON'T do.

And here, Apple will not support Flash.

So we see every major website in the world rejecting Flash, one after another, faster and faster, based upon their desire to have us Apple users view there site.

Every website wants us. All websites will move away from Flash. The juggernaught continues.

I wouldn't go that far, fanboy. But yeah, death to flash.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #17 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

This is an Apple driven issue not an Adobe issue. The problem is an OSX issue not a Flash 10.1, the problem is people here that spout off about it simply regurgitate anything Steve Jobs says rather then attempting to understand how technology currently works.

.
.
.
.
.

The issue is Apple is too stupid to give Adobe the information they need to allow Flash to use hardware acceleration via OSX. By allowing access to the correct API's this allows the stress to be taken off the CPU and allows the GPU to render a good bit of the processing needed to stress Flash web content.

The problem is Steve Jobs has an agenda and his isn't allowing Flash to become more efficient on OSX.

http://developer.apple.com/graphicsimaging/opengl/
http://developer.apple.com/mac/snowleopard/opencl.html

Aren't you just taking Adobe's BS as gospel?
I assume that Adobe at least have a ADC Subscription... they should be receiving code samples of OpenCL sometime during 2008.
post #18 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

No at all. I could care less how content is streamed because for me it just simply works and I understand to what browsers to use given the OS I am running at the time. I am not an Adobe fan or an HTML5 fan, I am a fan of the facts.

Here are two links you can look at.

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives..._new_tests.php

http://www.streaminglearningcenter.c...-depends-.html

Hopefully you can clarify this for me, because I didn't see it in the article (unless I missed it), but what was the specs of the hardware it was running/tested on. Both for Mac and PC machines?

I'm guessing that plays into it as well if it's running on a netbook or on a supped up "gaming machine".

Just wondering.
post #19 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

No at all. I could care less how content is streamed because for me it just simply works and I understand to what browsers to use given the OS I am running at the time. I am not an Adobe fan or an HTML5 fan, I am a fan of the facts.

Here are two links you can look at.

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives..._new_tests.php

http://www.streaminglearningcenter.c...-depends-.html

That basically means Chrome's not optimized yet.

OpenCL is not some sort of Apple secret sauce that only Apple can use.
Also hardware acceleration is only available on Macs using certain Nvidia chip, even for Apple's first party apps.

Fact of the matter is with CPUs nowadays, you really don't need hardware acceleration to decode a freaking mp4 file without using 50% CPU. Hell I can ENcode MP4 files with less effort.
post #20 of 57
Yes! Die Flash die!

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MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
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iPod nano 5th Gen 8GB Orange, iPad 3rd Gen WiFi 32GB White
MacBook Pro 15" Core i7 2.66GHz 8GB RAM 120GB Intel 320M
Mac mini Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz 8GB RAM, iPhone 5 32GB Black

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post #21 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Why would HTML5 hulu be a paid subscription? I think it is possible to put ads into HTML5 vids, no? Or is the whole site transitioning to subscription now, as has been rumored for a while now?

Because the company is having a hard time making money. They see a subscription as a way to increase their revenue.

In this regard. Can anyone explain to me why CBS and Disney didn't allow Apple to make a subscription service if they were apparently on-board with it?

Fox and NBC are very invested in Hulu and if/when Hulu goes subscription they are going to have no incentive to go with Apple. So this dream of an all-in-one subscription site online is little more than a pipe dream at this time.

Besides, if CBS sports and Disney owned ESPN were to part of that subscription plan the Apple subscription would kick the living bejesus out of Hulu. Especially if Apple doesn't follow Hulu's asinine lead with limiting back episodes available.

Of course, as with everything else Apple HAS to keep the price reasonable. Which is not a given where media companies are concerned. As they have a very bad habit of over-valuing what they have to offer.
post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

I am a fan of the facts.

Here are two links you can look at.

http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives..._new_tests.php

http://www.streaminglearningcenter.c...-depends-.html

Oh, right, because those are such unimpeachable sources that always get their facts straight. The fact is that Flash is a pig on OS X because Adobe have put no real effort into making it otherwise. This whole "we must have direct hardware access" nonsense is just a bunch of smoke and mirrors from Adobe. This isn't a secret, this is common knowledge.

Even assuming that Flash's problems were not do to Adobe's unwillingness to invest resources in improving it on non-windows platforms, it's not like plenty of developers haven't achieved quite acceptable graphic performance without direct hardware access. It's simply a pathetic excuse from Adobe.
post #23 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

This move had nothing to do with any clout that Apple has or that Flash is dying. CBS and others are attempting to sell media anyway they can and if Apple will not allow Flash they will simply code to their content to run via HTML5.

This is an Apple driven issue not an Adobe issue. The problem is an OSX issue not a Flash 10.1, the problem is people here that spout off about it simply regurgitate anything Steve Jobs says rather then attempting to understand how technology currently works.

First off, don't go mentioning 10.1 when it's still in beta. As of today, the most stable version of Flash, is still a CPU hog on the Mac.

A test conducted on Flash 10 at ArsTechnica:

Flash 10
Air: 17 FPS, 108 percent CPU
Mac Pro: 28 FPS, 140 percent CPU

Hulu Video:
Air: 84 percent CPU
Mac Pro: 56 percent CPU

YouTube
Air: 70 percent CPU
Mac Pro: 40 percent CPU

2advanced.com
Air: 20 percent CPU, peaked at 55
Mac Pro: 28 percent CPU, peaked at 66

Winterbells
Air: 85 percent CPU, gameplay noticeably ramped up to a more challenging speed
Mac Pro: 60 percent CPU, gameplay noticeably ramped up to a more challenging speed

It is ridiculous that watching a Hulu video takes up 56% of a Mac Pro's CPU.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Let use an example even someone like Quadra can understand yet still won't accept.

We can all agree that Safari is owned , supported and coded by Apple. When streaming video via Safari on OSX using Flash 10.1 CPU utilization has been tested at 32.07

Take the same version of Safari for Windows run the stream the same content using Flash 10.1 and the CPU utilization is 7.43%!!!!!!!!

WOW how could that be seeing Flash is a CPU hog?

It's funny you mentioning this considering that Flash is only offering h.264 hardware acceleration when video is not only the main problem but websites and annoying ads made in Flash which will continue to be CPU hog and battery life killer. You also forget to mention that most of the recent malware have been exploits through Flash.

Charlie Miller, white hat hacker: “There probably isn’t enough difference between the browsers to get worked up about. The main thing is not to install Flash!”

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The issue is Apple is too stupid to give Adobe the information they need to allow Flash to use hardware acceleration via OSX. By allowing access to the correct API's this allows the stress to be taken off the CPU and allows the GPU to render a good bit of the processing needed to stress Flash web content.

Anytime you say that "Apple is too stupid", you are making a fool of yourself. Did you actually read the article you're posting about? Why should Apple go out of their way to provide deeper access to the OS for the sake of a proprietary plugin?


Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The problem is Steve Jobs has an agenda and his isn't allowing Flash to become more efficient on OSX.

So instead of being like many of the other sheep here try and educate yourself on how this really works and come to grips with the fact that Steve Jobs is the issue not Adobe or Flash.


Yeah Jobs has an agenda and it is working. If his claims were unfounded, no one would be even be performing these tests.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Which by the way has little to no impact on the rest of the world that runs Windows so Flash isn't going anywhere anytime soon.

Maybe you should also get some education. IE9 will be supporting HTML5. This means for video and web page content that Flash is on life support. I'm sure Flash will still be around to hog CPUs on cheesy casual games but for anything else it is dead.
post #24 of 57
yeah the people complaining about the lack of flash in the ipad need to just buy a cheap PC and stfu. the major video sites like youtube and dailymotion support html5, at least in beta form. other video sites should follow.

i do wish there was consensus on the codecs for html5, and i do wish google and apple were on board with ogg rather than mpeg. firefox supporting ogg and safari/chrome supporting mpeg needs to change.

there is definitely an argument for flash support, however. non-video sites and applications using flash are all over the place.

even my slow env touch has flash support and can play videos off the full desktop youtube site (although they stutter just a bit too much for it to be useful, it proves that a very low speed device can handle flash)

flash can be completely replaced with html5 though, and there are even examples online of full games being created using html5. it's a really good thing for the internet that the iphone doesn't support flash, although it doesn't making owning one any better. in 5 years or less i think flash will be wiped off the web, but living with a flash world with an iphone is a bit painful.

luckily with the app store just about anyone that has a complicated flash site has an iphone app to compensate.
post #25 of 57
Apple could quite easily have said Quicktime Plugin was the standard for the iPad, but instead they went with the new HTML video tag. They are helping to bring the web back to the vendor neutral medium it was always meant to be.

Of course, they make most their money through iTunes, so they don't need web lock-in tricks anyway.
post #26 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by TECHSTUD View Post

Test? I thought it just worked.

And BTW Flash is the web standard for motion:
http://www.webstandards.org/2006/08/...ium-and-water/

Do you believe that this link supports your position? First off, the site is devoted to Web standards advocates, not to the standards themselves. Second, your link is to 2006, more than a lifetime in computer years. Having said that, perhaps, you should read what these advocates say:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Henick

  1. The Web is meant to be an open system, and limited-rights tools (including Flash) practically insult that virtue… without which the web would hardly be worth a damn. ... The objection’s not that Flash et. al. are instrinsically bad, it’s that their combined popularity and limited-rights status significantly reduces the realized value of the entire network. ...

I urge members of this forum to click through to your link and read the entire piece including responses. No Flash-basher could have said it better. Both Flash-bashers and Flash advocates on the site know what they are talking about.
post #27 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

First off I am highly educated and on your best day you wouldn't understand 10% of what I know about coding.

Generally speaking, if you have to tell people how well educated and intelligent you are, you are probably greatly overestimating your abilities.
post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The reality is Fanboys like you will simply believe whatever Steve Jobs tells you and you will fight the reality and the facts to the end. However the reality is Windows still controls 95% of the market share, Adobe has greatly improved Flash with 10.1 so its not going anywhere.

The fact is that Flash still runs better on WIndows than Mac, so Apple has been trying to get rid of it, so that it and Google have more of a chance against Microsoft. And in any case, as people pointed out, no one wanted to do comparison tests with animations in Javascript and tests with Flash, because Flash is still a CPU hog there. I'm willing to bet that Javascript does less work overall, because it's optimized for the browsers (not on Internet Explorer though). Secondly, H.264 on Flash is okay, but the problem is that its still encapsulated in a plugin. Why bother with a plugin when you can have support immediately without downloading any plugin in web standards? Answer how a closed-source plugin is better than not having a plugin and developing in open web standards that anyone can improve the performance of?

BTW, please stop putting up the strawman argument.
post #29 of 57
I think it's cool people can watch cbs stuff on their ipad, but I just think it's a shame that all the shows on CBS are crap
post #30 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

I think it's cool people can watch cbs stuff on their ipad, but I just think it's a shame that all the shows on CBS are crap

Not to worry. Other networks will follow suit.
post #31 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

First off I am highly educated and on your best day you wouldn't understand 10% of what I know about coding.

Where did I say anything about IE9?

I don't care what you know about coding. This is about common sense. You neglected to mention IE9 so I did for you. Adobe has cited IE as being one of the main reasons for Flash's continued dominance. IE9 will support HTML5 and h.264. This means that the writing is on the wall for Flash. Why would there be a need to forever continue serving Flash videos? Linux, OSX and Windows will now have the choice of using Safari, Firefox, or Chrome to view h.264. Mozilla and Opera will be forced to adopt h.264 whether they like it or not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Just because Flash 10.1 is still in beta doesn't mean anything. Clearly is shows Adobe moving in the right direction and hardware acceleration has been used in other areas for a while now.Then again you wouldn't know about that now would you.

Of course it means something. Basically all of us are using Flash 10. It still sucks. It no longer matters if Adobe is heading in the right direction. HTML5 is already here and quite usable even without the standard being official. The funny thing about that last sentence is that you have proven nothing I have cited as being wrong. BTW it doesn't take too much to be a Flash programmer. That may also be part of the problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

"It is ridiculous that watching a Hulu video takes up 56% of a Mac Pro's CPU."

You are right it is, so Apple should get their shit together and supply Adobe with the information they need so that problem can be resolved.

So let me get this straight. You are blaming Apple for something that is Adobe's fault? Apple is forcing everyone to change away from Flash, why would Apple need to help Adobe after years of Adobe essentially neglecting the Mac & also Linux? Whether it is intentional or not by Adobe, this is the problem that occurs when you have one company controls the access to content on the web. I'm also pretty sure that the ton of people Adobe has been laying off won't really help in advancing Flash for the future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

As a programmer you don't attempt to kill something that can be fixed. Which is exactly the case with Flash and its issues with OSX.

The fact is this is an Apple only issue which is why Flash isn't going anywhere before for 95% of the population that uses Windows this is a non issue.

That is what you're not getting. In order to move on with the future, the past needs to put away. HTML5 is the future. Not Flash. Anyone can see this is coming.

"Your old road is rapidly aging

Please get out of the new one if you can't lend a hand

For the times they are a changing "
post #32 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post


The reality is Fanboys like you will simply believe whatever Steve Jobs tells you and you will fight the reality and the facts to the end. However the reality is Windows still controls 95% of the market share, Adobe has greatly improved Flash with 10.1 so its not going anywhere.

As soon as the iPad hits the market, Flash is going bye bye.


Adobe is lazy.
post #33 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

As a programmer you don't attempt to kill something that can be fixed.

As a programmer, you absolutely kill things that can be fixed. Killing them and moving on to something better is absolutely the right thing to do at times. As a programmer, knowing when it's the right time to throw something away, instead of trying to fix it, is essential. This sort of ruthlessness is something that Apple currently understands very well.
post #34 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Of course, they make most their money through iTunes, so they don't need web lock-in tricks anyway.

No they don't. They make most of their money through hardware sales.
post #35 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Generally speaking, if you have to tell people how well educated and intelligent you are, you are probably greatly overestimating your abilities.

Funny that. It's like the guy who has to say "I get it" instead of simpy laughing when he hears a joke.
post #36 of 57
Anyone care to report the CPU usage of viewing Flash video inside VirtualBox or Parallels or VMWare vs native OS X on a Mac?

If the CPU usage is less, Adobe could just wrap the Flash engine in a Windows emulation layer and be ahead of the game.

- Jasen.

P.S. Gah. Why do I feed the trolls?
post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

The situation is that if Apple and Adobe stopped the bullshit and worked together they could bring a very solid version of Flash OSX and even the iPhone and iPad.

[...]

... the fact is Flash is not going away anytime soon everyone knows that

The situation is that Adobe sat on their little Flash empire for far too long, and now Adobe has no credibility regarding future Flash performance. They wouldn't even be doing anything now if their demise wasn't staring them in the face. Too little, too late, they can't be, nor should they be, trusted, especially now that a perfectly good alternative is available.

The situation also is that this is Adobe's problem, and it's disingenuous nonsense to try and lay it at Apple's door. Apple doesn't need to stop, or start, anything, the tools are, and have been there for Adobe to improve Flash performance, but they ignored them.

And, I think the situation is that Flash may go away a lot quicker than you think, that the move away from Flash, driven by mobile computing, will accelerate at a rapid pace, and that we are already at, or past, the tipping point.
post #38 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

After 22 years of doing this I am fairly certain my abilities are rock solid.

Yes, I'm convinced you are.
post #39 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Why would HTML5 hulu be a paid subscription? I think it is possible to put ads into HTML5 vids, no? Or is the whole site transitioning to subscription now, as has been rumored for a while now?

It might be paid because Hulu might finally decide to charge, something they've been planning for a long time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post

Couldn't this just be CBS moving to HTML5 to support every browser except IE?

1) MS already supports aspects of HTML5, though the HTML5 video tag will appear in IE9.

2) Firefox may be behind IE on this front since MS has put their weight behind H264, something Intel, Apple, and Google.

3) Only Mozilla and Opera are the H.264 holdouts and Ogg Theora isn't going to be the next standard of internet video. On the desktop this isn't a big deal as site designers can just call Flash as a back up. Same goes for older versions of IE. What they aren't likely to do is encode both H.264 and Ogg so they can use the HTML5 video tag for Firefox, too. That is too much work and effort on their part. The real problem for Mozilla comes in when they finally get Firefox Mobile on other platforms outside of Meamo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleRulez View Post

As soon as the iPad hits the market, Flash is going bye bye.

Adobe is lazy.

Go away, iGenius, your theory that only people who talk out against Apple has already failed with your lack attempt at going to the other extreme. No need to test it any further. The results are in: a douchebag is a douchebag no matter what name they use.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #40 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

This is a case where market share is going to play a factor.

What will happen is there will simply be dual code option to fun HTML5 version. Just becasue a company decides to create something that can be run via HTML5 doesn't mean Flash is going away anytime soon.

Market share is not going to be a factor at all, very shortly. Even IE, in v9 will have HTML5 support. There won't be a significant browser or platform without HTML5 support, making market share a non-issue. (Edit: Desktop Linux is not a significant platform.)

What will drive this issue is content providers, and content providers will prefer not to have to maintain multiple versions of their content, primarily because it costs them money to do so. This will follow the curve that the adoption of (successful) new technologies almost always follows. First a few, then more and more, and then a rush to switch.

If Adobe were smart, they'd be knocking themselves out to make tools for creating HTML5 content, rather than clinging to the past and Flash. Time and technology wait for no company.
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