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Apple acquires iPad trademark from Fujitsu

post #1 of 43
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Apple obtained the "entire interest" in the iPad trademark from Fujitsu last week, according to a filing published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

As reported by Patent Authority, Fujitsu Frontech North America Inc. assigned Apple the rights to the iPad trademark on March 17.

Fujitsu originally began using the iPad trademark in 2003 for its Windows CE-based handheld devices aimed at mobile Point Of Sale in retail (pictured below), a couple years after Apple introduced the iPod. The company was assigned the iPad trademark for a "hand-held computing device for wireless networking in a retail environment."



A USPTO examining attorney later refused Fujitsu's registration of the trademark in 2004 on the basis that the name was merely descriptive of the device. The company successfully contested the refusal.

Last spring, the USPTO notified Fujitsu that its iPad trademark application was "abandoned in full" because it failed to respond to a 2008 request within six months. Fujitsu then refiled the trademark application and it was "revived to pending status" last summer.

In September, Apple initiated proceedings challenging the validity of Fujitsu's trademark. The issue was repeatedly extended in October and December filings as the two companies deliberated the trademark rights.

The final resolution granted Apple the trademark just a few weeks before the iPad is scheduled to go on sale. It is not detailed in USPTO filings whether (or how much) Apple paid for the trademark assignment.
post #2 of 43
Just one MORE reason that Steve really needs to start dropping the 'i' from new products... Sure it can clearly be argued that its almost a 'brand' on its very own however everyone and their brother has used AND abused it TO DEATH and then back and then TO DEATH again.

So.. Apple... either start trademarking anything and everything you could possible imagine wanting a (tm) for in the next 10 or 20 years or move on already.. Things DO get stale after a while. \
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post #3 of 43
Problem solved.
post #4 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post

Just one MORE reason that Steve really needs to start dropping the 'i' from new products... Sure it can clearly be argued that its almost a 'brand' on its very own however everyone and their brother has used AND abused it TO DEATH and then back and then TO DEATH again.

So.. Apple... either start trademarking anything and everything you could possible imagine wanting a (tm) for in the next 10 or 20 years or move on already.. Things DO get stale after a while. \

Agreed. Apple has to stop wasting money on these kinds of things.
post #5 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave K. View Post

Agreed. Apple has to stop wasting money on these kinds of things.

You're right. Steve obviously has no idea what he's doing and it shows in Apple's quarterly reports and in the stock price.
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post #6 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post

Things DO get stale after a while. \

Numbers, please.

Every shred of material evidence points to the continued (and growing) effectiveness of Apple's "i" naming scheme.
post #7 of 43
Is Fujitsu still marketing the iPad POS device?
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post #8 of 43
The statement "Apple acquires iPad trademark from Fujitsu" cannot be supported form the article's account the way I read it. We don't know exactly how Apple came to be granted it, or whether Fujitsu was paid.

A bit more accuracy would be nice, otherwise thanks for the reports.
post #9 of 43
The success or failure of any trademarked name is reflected in the success of the product bearing that name, often reflected in sales.

A far as the iPad goes, the signs are more than encouraging. The "pad" jokes are by this time old, and most of the industry has moved on to what the product itself represents (save for a few juvenile members on Apple forums), which is something quite impressive, to say the least. Sales are rightly expected to follow suit.
post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The success or failure of any trademarked name is reflected in the success of the product bearing that name, often reflected in sales.

A far as the iPad goes, the signs are more than encouraging. The "pad" jokes are by this time old, and most of the industry has moved on to what the product itself represents (save for a few juvenile members on Apple forums), which is something quite impressive, to say the least. Sales are rightly expected to follow suit.

What he said.
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post #11 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Numbers, please.

Every shred of material evidence points to the continued (and growing) effectiveness of Apple's "i" naming scheme.

Don't you mean "circumstantial"? I doubt there is material evidence on this matter. And yes, I consider the popularity of the products in question to be circumstantial to the case because it does not eliminate numerous other reasons that the product may be popular, it's difficult or maybe even impossible to narrow that down.
post #12 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

Don't you mean "circumstantial"? I doubt there is material evidence on this matter. And yes, I consider the popularity of the products in question to be circumstantial to the case because it does not eliminate numerous other reasons that the product may be popular, it's difficult or maybe even impossible to narrow that down.

Would you agree that it has not been shown that people (other than you) are tired of the i names? It's pretty likely that the i names are a boon to sales - easy to say, easy to remember, simple and short. Marketing 101.

I guarantee you Apple has researched it, and they know what they're doing. Do you think they just pulled the "iPad" name out of a hat? You'll notice they did not go for the name iTouch - they used iPod Touch instead. They also did not continue the "iBook" name - they went to MacBook. They know what they're doing
post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by elroth View Post

Would you agree that it has not been shown that people (other than you) are tired of the i names? It's pretty likely that the i names are a boon to sales - easy to say, easy to remember, simple and short. Marketing 101.

I guarantee you Apple has researched it, and they know what they're doing. Do you think they just pulled the "iPad" name out of a hat? You'll notice they did not go for the name iTouch - they used iPod Touch instead. They also did not continue the "iBook" name - they went to MacBook. They know what they're doing

I don't think it's just me, note that I'm not the one that brought it up in this thread. I would agree that the benefits probably outweigh the negatives, at least for now. But as for material evidence? I doubt that exists for either way.
post #14 of 43
This is really about branding. A naming convention can earn instant perception among consumers across a family of products that have proven themselves successful. The common name format helps to overcome awareness barriers to the introduction of any new product. Consumers - almost without conscious thought - identify what category it occupies (electronics, food, etc.), who makes it, and where it can be purchased, while accepting that it will fit within the envelope of established expectations for other brands within the family. For leading consumer businesses, brand extensions through naming conventions can offer a powerful marketing advantage over competitors.

iMac
iPod
iTunes
iPad
iBooks

Big Mac
McNuggets
McCafe
McMuffin
McDouble
McGriddle
McSkillet
McChicken
McRib

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post #15 of 43
The Fujitsu's iPad is very very bad! Better Apple's one!

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post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveGee View Post

Just one MORE reason that Steve really needs to start dropping the 'i' from new products... Sure it can clearly be argued that its almost a 'brand' on its very own however everyone and their brother has used AND abused it TO DEATH and then back and then TO DEATH again.

So.. Apple... either start trademarking anything and everything you could possible imagine wanting a (tm) for in the next 10 or 20 years or move on already.. Things DO get stale after a while. \

Ha ha ha - Is that like a fate worse than a fate worse than death?
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kibitzer View Post

This is really about branding. A naming convention can earn instant perception among consumers across a family of products that have proven themselves successful. The common name format helps to overcome awareness barriers to the introduction of any new product. Consumers - almost without conscious thought - identify what category it occupies (electronics, food, etc.), who makes it, and where it can be purchased, while accepting that it will fit within the envelope of established expectations for other brands within the family. For leading consumer businesses, brand extensions through naming conventions can offer a powerful marketing advantage over competitors.

iMac
iPod
iTunes
iPad
iBooks

Big Mac
McNuggets
McCafe
McMuffin
McDouble
McGriddle
McSkillet
McChicken
McRib

You missed McSh*t - that's the only thing I use them for!
post #18 of 43
Apple seems to have done the right thing here. Even if it cost tens of millions of dollars, the iPad product name should bring in a large sum of money for Apple. By buying this already approved and published trademark for IPAD, they can use it as leverage to get the USPTO to expand and approve the iPad mark in Apple's pending iPad trademark applications in other classifications to cover a wider number of trademark uses. They can also go after the other, newer pending iPad marks by other people and get them invalidated due to this prior trademark they bought.
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamw View Post

Apple seems to have done the right thing here. Even if it cost tens of millions of dollars, the iPad product name should bring in a large sum of money for Apple. By buying this already approved and published trademark for IPAD, they can use it as leverage to get the USPTO to expand and approve the iPad mark in Apple's pending iPad trademark applications in other classifications to cover a wider number of trademark uses. They can also go after the other, newer pending iPad marks by other people and get them invalidated due to this prior trademark they bought.

I don't believe they bought it.
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post #20 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

The success or failure of any trademarked name is reflected in the success of the product bearing that name, often reflected in sales.

A far as the iPad goes, the signs are more than encouraging. The "pad" jokes are by this time old, and most of the industry has moved on to what the product itself represents (save for a few juvenile members on Apple forums), which is something quite impressive, to say the least. Sales are rightly expected to follow suit.

I keep reminding these same people they've been using a different kind of "pad" (pictured below) for years already so the joke isn't that clever.

post #21 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by STecchino View Post

I keep reminding these same people they've been using a different kind of "pad" (pictured below) for years already so the joke isn't that clever.


So true!

I've always liked the ThinkPad name.

In ThinkPad, however, there's the "Think" at the beginning of the name, which makes the rest sound like a single word, or else it takes away a bit of the emphasis from "Pad."

What might have been funny at first was that Apple was essentially calling it just a "Pad" by using the iPad name.

Regardless, it would appear (at least now) that Apple made the right decision by choosing "IPad." It's another addition to the successful "i"-naming lineup. Of course, this all assumes the iPad will be a success.
post #22 of 43
Good buy form Fujitsu, but it wasn't worth $31B

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post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by STecchino View Post

I keep reminding these same people they've been using a different kind of "pad" (pictured below) for years already so the joke isn't that clever.


Do these same people have a good old belly laugh every time they use a paper note pad at work? really you'd have to have a strangely wired way of thinking to make a leap from ipad or note pad or think pad to sanitary product. I can honestly say it never occurred to me. But as we say in the north of England, "there's nowt so queer as folk" in other words, it takes all sorts.

post #24 of 43
As we had predicted Fujitsu won the trademark lottery. Google had three options, a straight-up response with survey evidence, etc. arguing there was no likelihood of confusion with Fujitsus trademark. In the alternative they could have sought the consent of Fujitsu to register their iPad trademark with or without financial remuneration. Lastly, they could just purchase the mark from Fujitsu.

Evidently Steve Jobs opted for option three and chose to bring over a wheelbarrow full of cash to Fujitsu. Congratulations to Fujitsu for winning the latest Apple trademark lottery (See prior matter for the iPhone).

The only question now is will this lead to a generation of new i derivative intent-to-use trademarks filed for by cybersquatters in hopes of winning the next Apple trademark lottery?
post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trademark Company View Post

Google had three options, a straight-up response with survey evidence, etc.

if you're going to troll at least have enough brains to get the company right! [... and the product]

Trollers are getting dumber by the day...
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post #26 of 43
I know the iPad name in regards to Fujitsu was and is a point of contention among the Apple haters here. Saying that Apple had no right to the name because Fujitsu used it for another device. Steve Jobs is (favorite negative adjective here) ... blah, blah blah.
So sorry Apple haters; Apple and Jobs won again.
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post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirac View Post

The statement "Apple acquires iPad trademark from Fujitsu" cannot be supported form the article's account the way I read it. We don't know exactly how Apple came to be granted it, or whether Fujitsu was paid.

A bit more accuracy would be nice, otherwise thanks for the reports.

The article says "Fujitsu Frontech North America Inc. assigned Apple the rights to the iPad trademark on March 17."

So we know that Apple acquired the tm from Fujitsu.

Apple seems to have played by the rules and gotten what it needed in a businesslike manner. All good.
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by icyfog View Post

I know the iPad name in regards to Fujitsu was and is a point of contention among the Apple haters here. Saying that Apple had no right to the name because Fujitsu used it for another device. Steve Jobs is (favorite negative adjective here) ... blah, blah blah.
So sorry Apple haters; Apple and Jobs won again.

There's no point of contention. Apple probably had no rights to the name because Fujitsu used it for another electronic device.

Apple acquired the mark from Fujitsu. Likely the mark is more valuable to Apple than to Fujitsu, and likely Apple compensated them for most of that value. That's business. Apple wanted something owned by Fujitsu, and they worked out a deal.

Business as usual.

Why get into the "haters" line of comment? What the heck?

Apple didn't win. Fujitsu didn't lose. They came to a deal which benefited both of them. That's what makes business happen.
post #29 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trademark Company View Post

As we had predicted Fujitsu won the trademark lottery. Google had three options, a straight-up response with survey evidence, etc. arguing there was no likelihood of confusion with Fujitsus trademark. In the alternative they could have sought the consent of Fujitsu to register their iPad trademark with or without financial remuneration. Lastly, they could just purchase the mark from Fujitsu.

Evidently Steve Jobs opted for option three and chose to bring over a wheelbarrow full of cash to Fujitsu. Congratulations to Fujitsu for winning the latest Apple trademark lottery (See prior matter for the iPhone).

What's the evidence that Apple "paid" for it? There's none in the article, and none in the reference, and none at the USPTO page.

It's also not clear that Apple "paid" any cash for the iPhone trademark either. There was some agreement to work cooperatively on stuff with Cisco but I don't remember any cash considerations (as they say in sports).
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post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post

Is Fujitsu still marketing the iPad POS device?

Please clarify the use of "POS" in this context
post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brometheus View Post

Please clarify the use of "POS" in this context

http://www.currentdirections.com/har...u/ipad100.html



Point-Of-Sale . . .
post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

http://www.currentdirections.com/har...u/ipad100.html



Point-Of-Sale . . .

Thanks for the link. I was trying to be a bit clever, because of the multiple meanings of "POS". Fujitsu's device actually looks like it would be useful, so maybe that's why my attempt to be clever appears to have been a fail.
post #33 of 43
Heh...now all Google has to do is manage the same thing for Android. They don't hold that trademark from what I understand.
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brometheus View Post

Thanks for the link. I was trying to be a bit clever, because of the multiple meanings of "POS". Fujitsu's device actually looks like it would be useful, so maybe that's why my attempt to be clever appears to have been a fail.

Yeah, I know what your intent was.
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark2005 View Post

What's the evidence that Apple "paid" for it? There's none in the article, and none in the reference, and none at the USPTO page.

It's also not clear that Apple "paid" any cash for the iPhone trademark either. There was some agreement to work cooperatively on stuff with Cisco but I don't remember any cash considerations (as they say in sports).

Can't argue with you that we don't have evidence that they actually paid for it. In our experience, however, corporations rarely give away their assets for free. The USPTO's assignment is merely one of many documents surely executed between Apple and Fujitsu on this. More likely than not they entered into something called a Confidential Settlement Agreement or Intellectual Property Assignment Agreement wherein the actual simple assignment filed with the USPTO was merely an exhibit.

In short, they do not make the details of their transactions public unless the are required to do so by the SEC. In this instance, they would not be as the purchase of an asset and the details thereof are not required to be reported unlike the acquisition of all assets (stock) of a publicly traded company.

So you've got us on the evidence factor. Again, we just doubt that Fujitsu would say "Here, take this for free."

Have a good Saturday.
post #36 of 43
...
Millions of us will NEVER refer to or call it by it's given name.
It will have a street name like slate, board, tablet, or something. Or people will just give it a personal name like a pet.
Most people now still refer to it as Apple Tablet.

Just because Apple gave it the worst name possible does not mean it's going to catch on. Furthermore, no branding agency in the world is applauding this experiment in absurdity.

And contrary to some of your posts - the brand is not taking off... not at all. Your confusing the product excitement with brand excitement.
The Apple brand however, is as strong as ever.

My favorite is still listening to the keynote - when the name drops down - hearing all the people groan.
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

All you effeminate nerds can have your pad.
Millions of us will NEVER refer to or call it by it's given name.
It will have a street name like slate, board, tablet, or something.

Yeah, like That Nintendo Motion Console everyone still talks about... I faintly remember nobody liking its name.

Never mind that most people in non-English speaking nations don't even think twice about the name.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

All you effeminate nerds can have your pad.
Millions of us will NEVER refer to or call it by it's given name.
It will have a street name like slate, board, tablet, or something. Or people will just give it a personal name like a pet.
Most people now still refer to it as Apple Tablet.

Just because Apple gave it the worst name possible does not mean it's going to catch on. Furthermore, no branding agency in the world is applauding this experiment in absurdity.

And contrary to some of your posts - the brand is not taking off... not at all. Your confusing the product excitement with brand excitement.
The Apple brand however, is as strong as ever.

My favorite is still listening to the keynote - when the name drops down - hearing all the people groan.

Closeted much?
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by rain View Post

...
Millions of us will NEVER refer to or call it by it's given name.
It will have a street name like slate, board, tablet, or something. Or people will just give it a personal name like a pet.
Most people now still refer to it as Apple Tablet.

Just because Apple gave it the worst name possible does not mean it's going to catch on. Furthermore, no branding agency in the world is applauding this experiment in absurdity.

And contrary to some of your posts - the brand is not taking off... not at all. Your confusing the product excitement with brand excitement.
The Apple brand however, is as strong as ever.

My favorite is still listening to the keynote - when the name drops down - hearing all the people groan.

That's a curious "us" in your comment. "What us nerd boy"? Millions are just fine calling it by its given name. What're you going to call it then? "That Apple tablet mobile device thingy"? Perhaps "Apple's Slice of Heaven"? Maybe "Computing Squared"? How about "The best internet, device, the best email device, the best eBook reader, the internet in your hands magical device"?

Seriously you can be so funny sometimes - even when you don't mean to be!
post #40 of 43
Apple could battle Fujitsu over ownership of iPad name
http://forums.appleinsider.com/showthread.php?t=106666

This is just one thread with anti-Apple, anti-Jobs, and anti-iPad name posts.
There are probably more I could find if I cared more to find them.
Why do that though, even this thread contains anti-Apple, etc., jabs.
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