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Smoking

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 
I'm in the process of trying to quit for 1000th time in my life. I'm only 26. This time I'm trying the patch. I never really smoke all that much (at most 8-9 cigs/day), but it's getting to the point where I can't go out to a bar without coming home feeling really crappy from smoking too much. I can't play basketball without getting winded way too soon. I guess over the course of years of smoking, even 8-9 cigs can take their toll.

Has anyone here ever quit? It's gotta be the hardest thing I've ever had to do. One time I was able to stop for 3 weeks, while on vacation travelling down the west coast (in Cali I thought it was funny that I couldn't smoke cigarettes in the bar, but people were smoking pot all over ). But once I got back here and my coffeeshops were calling, it was all over. My problem is that smoking is a way for me to relax on breaks in the middle of doing work. Now, what am I supposed to do? Reading the paper gets old. I should get some mindless games on my computer to take breaks with.

Anyway, anyone want to share their success (or failure) experiences? I guess this is my support group. I love AI
post #2 of 54
I don't understand addiction.

My mother smoked when she was younger. She had quit when she had kids (so she didn't smoke for about 5 years) She started smoking about a year after my younger brother was born, but my father got on her case about it. Then she just quit. I remember she threw out a half pack of cigs and never touched them again. Simple. No patch, no hypnosis, just a little resolve.

I smoked too, for about a half a year -- summer after HS and 1st semester at U. It didn't give me any real satisfaction, I remember thinking, "Good or bad, what's the point?" Just seemed like a waste of money, time, and lung tissue.

I guess some people really enjoy it, but I don't see why. When they're cramming in the lounges/non-smoking dining halls , I can see some of my students burn through a half a pack of smokes in less than hour. I suppose nervousness contributes to it: I ussually ate for 18 waking hours, every day, for two weeks straight during term paper/exam time.

But I ussually eat pretty much constantly anyway. At least food is satisfying. Cigarettes?
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post #3 of 54
I started and stopped when I was in college in the late 1980s- early 90s. I smoked a little more than you, but less than a pack/day.

It was Christmas break, and I remember watching us invade Panama on CNN. I was sick and had a sore throat, so the cigs tasted like hell. I was going to my parent's house, and my mom had a chronic respiratory illness, so I definitely didn't smoke in the house. I was there for about 2 weeks, so I just took advantage of the situation. When I got back to college, I had been able to quit completely, and so I never smoked again.

I had tried before, but I think there were just too many cues that were normally associated with smoking - having morning coffee, going out to drink with friends, etc.

So for me, it was a prolonged change in surroundings, accompanied by a little conditioned taste aversion from the sore throat.

BTW - I sent you a private message.
post #4 of 54
I first started smoking when I was around 17..the occasional sneaking of cigs when my parents weren't around, so it wasn't that much. Then I joined the army and my smoking increased to around a pack a day..or a little less. I smoked for around 18 years and then on January 28th, 2000, I decided to quit. Well...my girlfriend at the time helped me decide too I just finished the pack (don't wanna waste the money!) and stopped.

Granted the urges still continue but if I want one all I have to do is go to my buddies house and be around him for just a little bit...sucker smokes like a chimney! Ugh...the smell is nasty to me now.

But, for so long I enjoyed smoking. Very relaxing to me. Dang....the store is just up the road...hmmm. gotta resist....the...urge......


$3+/pack!! no way!! whew..glad I did quit!
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post #5 of 54
The best way to quit cigarettes is to dont start.

Anyway there is too type of fumors, the one who are addictive the others who are not . There are test in order to know that. If you are addictive you should take Nicotine patch.
If not, just a habit or a way to relax , try to find something different, why not a lollipot like Kojak ? (dont have to shave your hairs too )
post #6 of 54
Well, I've never smoked in my life. I've been around some people who smoked, but at my high school, I always thought it was sad to see the people who smoked hang around after school pretending they were cool.

In reality, if they ever met up with anyone from a bigger HS or urban setting, they would have had their asses kicked.

Seriously, though, I never understand why people start that **** . I lost two of my grandparents to smoking before I was even born. In fact, my dad wasn't even out of high scool when his mom died.

So whatever you can do to stop, just do it. If it means the patch, going cold turkey, whatever. Just stop before it really effects your health.
post #7 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by powerdoc:
<strong>why not a lollipot like Kojak ? (dont have to shave your hairs too</strong><hr></blockquote>

Urgh. Reminds me of my childhood pictures. I didn´t get any hair on my head before I was about four years old (You know: Too much testosteron :cool: ) and everyone thought I was sooo cute with a lollipop in my mouth. Result: hundreds of pictures of me with one in my mouth.

[ 03-03-2002: Message edited by: Anders ]</p>
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post #8 of 54
BTw: I have never smoked regular cigarettes. Only when mixed with hash. But stopped that when I was about 21. Now I get high on Valhrona chocolate, riding my bike to the edge of the physical possible, My Bloody Valentine and occasional on falling in love (I´m such a teenager when it come to that)
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post #9 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by Anders:
<strong> and occasional on falling in love (I´m such a teenager when it come to that)</strong><hr></blockquote>

Occasional ?, with all your testosterone, you are certainly the Casanova of Denmark.
post #10 of 54
The patch IMO works great, YMMV. It removes the craving, so you just have the physical habit to get past. I'd use 'Step 2' patch, which will be overkill, and after 2 weeks, use step 3 for at most a month.

Other people prefer the gum, which IMO is absolutely disgusting, and burns your mouth. The patch itches (BAD!) when you first put it on, but it is always there, always working.

Give it a try.
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post #11 of 54
Whatever your method, understand that the challenge will be at least 51% mental / psychological. Probably more....

But I'm sure if you make up your mind that it's not something you want to be doing, you will quit - whether it takes two days, two weeks or two months. The only tip I can give you is if you breakdown at some point, don't feel like because you had one, that you failed. Have your one and try again from that point. Even if you're unable to totally quit a first, having one or two during the course of a week is a lot better than one or two packs right? It's called progress.

Just keep at it and you'll be able to quit...we have faith in you.

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post #12 of 54
I guess I don't really understand addictions. I mean I have never been addicted to anything and I can't imagine not being able to stop something. Can someone explain how cigs can have such a hold over you and what does an addiction feel like? What is it that makes you neeeeeeeed to smoke?
post #13 of 54
why the hell did you all start?

What was so attractive about inhaling smoke?
post #14 of 54
I smoked for a long time mostly because I enjoyed it. One day I woke up and as I was about to have my first cigarette of the day, I realized I really didn't enjoy it anymore, so I quit. It sucked for about a week and then I was fine. The only time I've ever considered starting again was the morning of 9/11.
post #15 of 54
Thread Starter 
Why did I start? Heh, I have no idea. It was my freshman year in college and a lot people were experimenting with a lot of things. Some people alcohol, some sex, some drugs. For me it was cigs. Now, I'm addicted. I didn't understand addictions either until I tried to quit the first time. It's like a nagging, always on your mind thing. For me, and alot of others, it was also VERY psychological. I have some many habits that are ingrained (getting coffee on my way to school in the morning and smoking a cig, having a cig before I get started on work, a break in the middle, one after I have dinner, one before bed...) all of these are learned behaviors and without getting rid of ALL of them, I couldn't change my mindset enough to stop.

That's the reason I was able to stop for 3 weeks one summer. At that point there is no more physical addiction. I was all psychological and once I got back in my familiar environment, it was back to my old routine. I'm a psychologist, so I understand all of this and I can tell you the theory and the brain chemistry involved. But that does nothing to help me quit.

I'm on the patch now (step 2) and the efficacy of these appears to be the best. I've read some (scientific, not drug company funded) articles and my chances look best this way. I can continue doing my old routine but without the physical nagging and relearning my habits without cigarettes. So far, so good. Thanks for the support.
post #16 of 54
Good Luck all.

My grandfather was a heavy smoker until my mother had me, then he quit. He told me it wasn't hard for him to quit at all, but there was one problem. To get rid of the addiction, he ate more. He used to be 6'1 170lb, now he is 240lb. He also tells me after all these years of not smoking, he still liked to smoke because it made him relax and pass time.
post #17 of 54
I tried to see why people enjoy it so much by smoking a few cigarettes...for a few days, never finished the pack.

I still can't figure it out. It's not enjoyable. And no, I didn't just puff...I did inhale. It made no difference.

It's lame.
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post #18 of 54
I went through something similar to Eugene, actually, just last week. Having smoked occasionally (puff. not inhale) while drunk or partying or whatnot, I went out and bought a pack to see what the fuss was about. My roommate is a pack-every-2-day smoker. Bought some, tried, ended up smoking 4 and giving my roomie the pack. While i love the smell of cigar smoke, i just can't get cigarettes and me rectified. Who knows....
post #19 of 54
Good luck to all trying to quit.

I've never smoked, either. I never saw why it was "cool" -- to me smoking was something my grandparents did. The inside of my grandmother's car always reeked of cigarette smoke, and the ashtray was always overflowing -- gross.

Seeing a woman smoke usually kills any kind of attraction to her.
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post #20 of 54
I started smoking tobacco when I was 12, and after my mother died from lung cancer at a very early age I tried to quit...I had been smoking for 5 years. It took me maybe 6 concerted efforts over a one year period, and finally succeeded after going cold turkey. it was incredibly difficult, and the psychological addiction was so intense. The need to smoke was always in the front of my mind, and everything seemed to remind me of cigarettes, or how badly I wanted one. I played a game with myself, and pretended that if I can handle going one day without a cigarette, then I can pretend the next day that I am just starting to quit, and last out that day too, so I took it one day at a time and before I knew it, one day had turned into one week, then it was one month. The cravings gradually diminished, and it has now been several years without a cigarette. I still have the occasional "I would die for a smoke now"...and then I double-take and say to myself..."don't even think it". Once or twice I still get nightmares in which I have started smoking again, and wake in a cold sweat, to the relief and realization that "it was just a dream...phew".

I once read a report in Science News that the subjective psychological withdrawal from nicotine addiction is one of the toughest, even more so than heroin/morphine and on a par with that resulting from barbiturate withdrawal. In my case, I can honrestly believe it.

Now as a an ex-smoker, and having now had 3 family members die from smoking-caused ailments (lung cancer, congestive heart failure and emphysema) I find it really bard to tolerate anything to do with tobacco ab/use. Living in California, I am so grateful for the local laws that forbid smoking in public places; it means I can go to a restaurant or club without having to ingest someone else's filthy and toxic exhalations.

On the political angle, any party that accepts donations from tobacco companies is as morally in the gutter as if they had gotten financed by some scumbag Colombian cocaine cartel. The legality of the substance is a moot point when you consider that cigarettes kill 400,000 Americans every YEAR!

In fact looking at the number of Americans that die from substance abuse every year, it seems that the substances with the least legal control are those that are responsible for the most fatalities. It seems that the relative legal status of a substance has little do with the relative public health and safety implications.

in 1994:

Tobacco ...................400,000 deaths annually

Alcohol...................&gt;150,000 deaths annually

Prescription drugs (bad reactions,
hospital errors,..........&gt;100,000 deaths annually

Prescription drug abuse . .&gt;15,000 deaths annually

All illegal drugs
(cocaine/heroin,meth,
LSD etc)...............approx 5000 deaths annually.

Marijuana.......unknown...zero directly attributed

I am not suggesting for a minute that we should go changing the laws and locking people up for tobacco possession. Since it has been well-known since the mid 1960s that tobacco smoking can and will probably kill you in one of a number of extremely unpleasant fashions, smokers should be responsible for their own actions. Tobacco addiction, like any addiction such as sex, gambling, surfing the net, playing videogames, taking recreational drugs etc etc is a medical problem, not a crime, period.
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post #21 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by CaseCom:
<strong>Seeing a woman smoke usually kills any kind of attraction to her.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Usually... usually? You mean always, don't you?
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post #22 of 54
Thread Starter 
Well, I'm on my second day and last night was tough. I tried to concentrate on the articles I was reading but my mind kept wandering. I had trouble falling asleep and I had some extremely vivid dreams. I don't think that I've ever dreamt in that much detail before. On the box of the patch it said I might experience some sleep disturbance and some strange dreams as side-effects, but I kinda liked it (NO, they were not that kind of dream.) Anyway, I've put my second patch on and I'm looking forward to my second day of not smoking...

Also, my morning breath hasn't been this normal in a long time. Some advantages already.
post #23 of 54
You can also get a sort of fake cigarette from the same guys who make the patches. They are just a sort of plastic tube, in which you put a cartridge. You then get a smokeless nicotine dose.
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post #24 of 54
keep up with the patch- I used it to quit about 5 years ago. It definitely felt very weird for the first few days, and I did want to smoke, but by about the third day the urge to smoke became more of the habit than of the addiction. After a while it was very easy and I have only tried one cigarette in the past 5 years (and it was awful)

And the benefits are fantastic- I had no idea how much I was a slave to that habit, and how much it impacted my physical health. I now can run farther without getting winded, don't get sick as often, and don't stink of smoke (after a month of not smoking, you will really notice how foul it smells on other people's breath). Plus, I don't know how it is where you are, but cigarettes here have become really expensive.

Downside? For me, only two. I have no use fot the nice silver cig case and Dunhill lighter I had (got rid of them), and I can't takes as frequent breaks as I could. It seems that it is acceptable to tell your co-workers every hour that you have to have a cigarette. But when you quit, you can't just say "I have to have a break form your lameness" and get the time off

[ 03-05-2002: Message edited by: tmp ]</p>
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post #25 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by torifile:
<strong>I'm in the process of trying to quit for 1000th time in my life. I'm only 26. This time I'm trying the patch. I never really smoke all that much (at most 8-9 cigs/day), but it's getting to the point where I can't go out to a bar without coming home feeling really crappy from smoking too much. I can't play basketball without getting winded way too soon. I guess over the course of years of smoking, even 8-9 cigs can take their toll.

Has anyone here ever quit? It's gotta be the hardest thing I've ever had to do. One time I was able to stop for 3 weeks, while on vacation travelling down the west coast (in Cali I thought it was funny that I couldn't smoke cigarettes in the bar, but people were smoking pot all over ). But once I got back here and my coffeeshops were calling, it was all over. My problem is that smoking is a way for me to relax on breaks in the middle of doing work. Now, what am I supposed to do? Reading the paper gets old. I should get some mindless games on my computer to take breaks with.

Anyway, anyone want to share their success (or failure) experiences? I guess this is my support group. I love AI </strong><hr></blockquote>

two of my friends who were pretty damn heavy smokers, went on a trip with me and a few others to climb MT whitney....although because of some setbacks we didn't get over whitney...the trip still lasted a week and since it was with our school, of course there was no smoking. so we hiked maybe 10-20 miles a day and on the 2nd last day my friend looks over to my other friend and says "hey....wanna quit smoking?"(they are both really winded from having just gone over a really high pass) the response "sure buddy"
neither of them have smoked a cigarette since...that was like 5 months ago.

perhaps a similar thing could work for you....since being out in nature at high altitudes hiking daily got rid of all the phsyical addictions....so all they needed to do was tell themselves not to smoke and they could.
get a half a dozen or so of your friends together and go backpacking...bring NO cigarettes and see if you can do it.

I personally don't smoke...I think its vile. but thats just me.
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post #26 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by Jonathan:
<strong>I went through something similar to Eugene, actually, just last week. Having smoked occasionally (puff. not inhale) while drunk or partying or whatnot, I went out and bought a pack to see what the fuss was about. My roommate is a pack-every-2-day smoker. Bought some, tried, ended up smoking 4 and giving my roomie the pack. While i love the smell of cigar smoke, i just can't get cigarettes and me rectified. Who knows....</strong><hr></blockquote>

yea its funny how cigars smell so much better than cigarettes....even my brothers hand-made cigarettes smell horrible.
when I smell a cigar I usually think "thats a nice smell" and when I realize what it is I usually think "wow....cigars are wierd"
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post #27 of 54
I had my first cig when I was 5 yrs old. My father smoked and being curious I lit one and choked my lungs out. I could not understand what the attraction to smoking was and therefore was my last cig ever...

I had a friend who smoked a pack a day and one day just stopped because the packs were getting too expensive.

As for the patches, my friends who used them to quit all experienced wild and manic dreams. They would tell me it was almost like hallucination (sp?).

One last thing...I just came acrossed Marlborough Country cig ad. I have not seen those ads for a while. What caught my eye was the S. General's warning in 18pt font size that just says "Smoking Kills." No BSing anymore!
post #28 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by Wrong Robot:
<strong>two of my friends who were pretty damn heavy smokers, went on a trip with me and a few others to climb MT whitney....although because of some setbacks we didn't get over whitney...</strong><hr></blockquote>

Whitney's not a real big challenege. I've done it before as a side trip from my favourite route over Shepherd's Pass. Thought about doing it in a day from W. Portal, though since I moved out of Cali I haven't had the chance.

I'm curious as to why you didn't make it all the way up. Care to share the story?
post #29 of 54
If you just puff cigars, I suppose it's not so bad, but anybody who really takes in cigar smoke...it's about 10x worse than cigarette smoke...

Good luck with mouth, tongue, nose, lung, throat cancer...
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post #30 of 54
[quote]Originally posted by tonton:
<strong>

Whitney's not a real big challenege. I've done it before as a side trip from my favourite route over Shepherd's Pass. Thought about doing it in a day from W. Portal, though since I moved out of Cali I haven't had the chance.

I'm curious as to why you didn't make it all the way up. Care to share the story?</strong><hr></blockquote>

our group wasn't very together....one guy was mister macho "I can do everything myself" not a team player type of guy. me and my two aforementioned friends were just backpacking...we weren't trying to be super backpackers, we weren't trying to be whiny...we just were. then there were a few who just consistantly bitched and moaned the whole way. It was a school trip(no not punishment)and our two trip leaders, though they were fit and able and experienced, were not doing a very good job. the trip was about 90 miles total I think....at about 11000 ft dropping to like 9800 or something like that at its lowest and just under 14000 at its highest.
it was designed to be such
2 days to get to the whitney base camp
1 day up and down whitney
2 days getting to the rendeavous with the rest of the school(everyone was on seperate trips around kings canyon area)
1 day at the all-school base camp(at like 5000 ft. or something thats actually not below freezing at night)
then going back to school.

we got misguided the second day and ended up having to reorganize and plot our course...this caused us to make a ghetto camp site with no bear boxes in the middle of no where about 8 miles either way from the nearest camp site. that set us back a day. taht when we got to the whitney base camp, we had not much choice but to not climb it. so we instead had a lay over day and then we hiked double the pre determined length the last day...but that wasn't so bad once we got over forrester pass(around 13800 ft.) cause then it was all downhill and lower elevations.

all in all thing just went bad...and one night we had this totally bunk pesto shite that was like 90% garlic and like 10% some other nausiateing material. that one of the trip leaders and I puked it all up.
****ing sick....bleck.
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post #31 of 54
after a cuban you can realy get a buzz.
A week after I had one I wanted another quite bad!! No wonder you see Fidel always chomping on one.
post #32 of 54
Nicotine can be absorbed by any part of the skin (it is one of the few contact poisons) as well as mucous membranes. That's why chewing tobacco, cigars and cigarettes are pretty much equal in their addictive quality. And kudo's to all of you that tried it and didn't get hooked. I hope that you will keep it up, and continue to tell people that smoking/chewing (ew!) is lame. The only reason I started was that at 19 I looked about 13, and I thought that it made me look sophisticated.

And Torifile, once you have quit, (and I am sure you will stay quit), there will be tons of people who will denigrate your success by saying that since you only smoked half a pack a day or so that you were "not really a smoker". Remember, this is an accomplishment; pretty soon it will be as alien to you as eating slugs.

[ 03-05-2002: Message edited by: tmp ]</p>
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post #33 of 54
I understand the chemical, physical and psychological addictions to smoking once you've started. I even can understand people who started in high school or when smoking was socially acceptable. But what I totally don't understand is how anyone could even consider picking up a cigarette today if they've never done so before.

We all know how bad they are, how addictive they can be and how so many people die every day because they smoke. Yet someone in college can light up a smoke just to see what the fuss is about? That boggles my mind. You might as well jump out of a plane without a parachute to see what thats like too. <img src="confused.gif" border="0">
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post #34 of 54
I'd rather eat a slug a day than smoke half a pack a day.

I've never understood exactly why people start smoking. I doubt I ever will. I mean, I've read this thread and heard many other people talk about it, but I just can't see someone enjoying their first few puffs that much. Of course, I was never really part of the "in" crowd...

Oh well, good luck with the quitting thing! I really do hope it works for you, at least for the sake of the people who have to breath around you.
post #35 of 54
torifile, we share a common path: I quit March 1 (after many false starts in the past year--and smoking for 14 years). I'm chewing nicorette (the ability to do something when the urge occurs works for me).

Relax, drink lots of water, exercise everyday, and relax (again): the world won't end if we don't smoke (at least I hope not).

At least we're not addicted to alcohol, cocaine, or heroin.
post #36 of 54
Thread Starter 
Day 3... It's getting a little harder now because I've got some time to either kill or do work. Usually I kill time by smoking and I'll be damned if I'm going to have to start working more just because I'm quitting So far, so good.

Again, thanks for all the support. I'm quite sure that I can do it this time because I've decided that I'm not going to be a slave to the Man anymore. I'm tired of wasting my money and having to freeze my a$$ off when I need a cigarette in the winter (I had always been a considerate smoker, never lighting up even in my own apartment). I'm tired of having to think about how much time I have before meeting a professor and wondering if I could get the smell off in time. I'm tired of feeling congested in the morning. It's over, folks. I know it now.

To all of you who haven't smoked DON'T START. You may think that you won't get addicted, but you will. Even me, smoking relatively little for a smoker of 7 years, got addicted and quitting is hard.

I need some gum now...
post #37 of 54
Thread Starter 
[quote]Originally posted by scottiB:
<strong>torifile, we share a common path: I quit March 1 (after many false starts in the past year--and smoking for 14 years). I'm chewing nicorette (the ability to do something when the urge occurs works for me).

Relax, drink lots of water, exercise everyday, and relax (again): the world won't end if we don't smoke (at least I hope not).

At least we're not addicted to alcohol, cocaine, or heroin.</strong><hr></blockquote>

I tried the gum and it didn't work for me. I could tell it helped the urges, but something about it didn't work. Maybe I was being cheap and not using it enough, thinking that each piece cost me x dollars. (I never thought that about cigarettes, strangely enough.) The patch is good because I don't need to think about the cravings all day and fighting them. But both have pretty good efficacy ratings. As for effectiveness, that's another story. Unfortunately, many quitters don't stay quit for too long. Something like 60% go back w/i a year. But the more attempts you make, the better your chances of quitting. Good luck to you.
post #38 of 54
I've never smoked, and I have no intention whatsoever to start. I work in a cancer registry, after all (although that doesn't stop several of the employees from smoking like stacks).

I still get exposed to smoke a lot, as a musician. My drums smell like cigarettes.

A lot of the young women here smoke because it's an appetite suppressant. If any of you happen to be geeky enough to be reading this, I'll take a few extra curves over smoker's breath any day of the week.

From what I have read, I can offer a couple of suggestions to those valiant souls trying to quit: First, change your habits. If you're used to taking breaks, bring a book to work, or post here. I've heard that plain old chewing gum works pretty well for the oral-fixation habit that cigarettes can engender. Also, one woman claimed to notice that her real craving for a cigarette lasted about three seconds, so she concentrated on breathing for that amount of time every time the craving appeared, and waited until it passed. Eventually, it became second nature to do so, and more eventually the craving itself diminished.

Both my parents quit cold turkey: My mother when she found out she was pregnant, and my father just ... did, after moving to California. He smoked pipes, not cigarettes, but he was worried about mouth and throat cancers and general health issues.

[ 03-05-2002: Message edited by: Amorph ]

[ 03-05-2002: Message edited by: Amorph ]</p>
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post #39 of 54
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I know that people say you should change your habits. That's what all the books tell you and all the instructions to the patch and gum say. But the thing is that I don't want to. I don't want giving up cigarettes to mean making a complete lifestyle change. I happen to think that I lead a pretty healthy lifestyle with the exception of my (former) smoking habit. I get a cup of coffee at a coffeeshop to do work so that I can get out the psychology building everyday. Other grad students are stuck here all day and they hate it. I have an occasional night out with friends and I don't want to give that up. Nor do I think I could. Sure, I might be able to stop for a while, but once I go back, the associations are still the same: coffeeshop/cigarette, a drink/cigarette. It's a learning thing and the psychological addiction can't be broken without relearning those associations.

So, from a completely psychological standpoint it makes most sense to use a nicotine replacement treatment (the patch or gum) and continue your normal life, relearning your habits without that one (sometimes REALLY big) piece. It's harder to do and that's why people recommend changing your habits, but that's why so many people fail at quitting. (IMNHO, at least).
post #40 of 54
I'm dregging up this old thread because I'm trying to quit again. Using the patch again. It didn't work last time because I didn't let it. This time at day 16 and going strong.

The one thing that I've found that has helped me this time that I didn't have last time: Citrus Sour Altoids. I know it sounds weird, but I needed to have SOMETHING to divert my urges towards when I'm craving a cig. It's worked remarkably well. If I have a craving, I'll pop a citrus sour. And I'll only have them when I've got a craving. When I need a break from work and would normally stop for a cigarette, I'll go outside and have an Altoid. It has really helped.

From a psychological standpoint it makes sense. Behavior replacement is the way to go for changing functional but problematic behaviors. If you're going to try to quit, you need something to take the cigarette's psychological function.

Wish me luck in my continued attempts. I think I've got it nailed now, though.
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