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WSJ: After strong initial demand, some lines for Apple iPad 'thin' - Page 5

post #161 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

A situation made even more frustrating given that I've tried to sync 6 different bluetooth mice to the iPad (including my Apple Magic Mouse), and it refuses to recognize any of them.

So when docked in the keyboard stand, it appears that you'll have to constantly go back and forth between typing on the keyboard and operating the device via touch-screen input.

There surely must be a better solution than this...

You can't use a multitouch device with a mouse.
post #162 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You can't use a multitouch device with a mouse.

I don't understand why not. If you can use an external keyboard with the iPad which has a software keyboard, use of a mouse could surely be possible, if Apple wanted it so.
post #163 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

I don't understand why not. If you can use an external keyboard with the iPad which has a software keyboard, use of a mouse could surely be possible, if Apple wanted it so.

It's considered to be confusing for one. Another reason is that touch works differently from mouse control. With a mouse pointer you have hover control. With touch you don't. Either you tap it, or you don't. Thats why Flash animations that are designed to work with a cursor with rollover effects won't work properly with a touch based device.

Also, a mouse is a relative positioning device, whereas multitouch is a direct positioning device.

I suppose Apple, or Google could get it to work, but so far, Win 7 that does both is considered to be almost unworkable.
post #164 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

So when docked in the keyboard stand, it appears that you'll have to constantly go back and forth between typing on the keyboard and operating the device via touch-screen input.

There surely must be a better solution than this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

I don't understand why not. If you can use an external keyboard with the iPad which has a software keyboard, use of a mouse could surely be possible, if Apple wanted it so.

These are excellent observations.

It seems like something that Apple could have addressed (I already ordered the keyboard-dock......\)
post #165 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

I suppose Apple, or Google could get it to work, but so far, Win 7 that does both is considered to be almost unworkable.

The latter point is not terribly germane -- the fact that Windows 7could not do something has rarely been an excuse for why Apple might/could not.

It is also possible that they just did not think of it, or were lazy, or said at some point, 'let's go with what we have here than try to dot every i.'

Add: Perhaps here is where a stylus could have been a solution.
post #166 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

The latter point is not terribly germane -- the fact that Windows 7could not do something has rarely been an excuse for why Apple might/could not.

It is also possible that they just did not think of it, or were lazy, or said at some point, 'let's go with what we have here than try to dot every i.'

Add: Perhaps here is where a stylus could have been a solution.

It's not that MS couldn't get it to work. It's that it doesn't seem to work well together. Either the GUI is designed for one, or for the other. I also doubt that Apple was lazy. It's a decision on their part. I also think that they looked at the trackpads on laptops, even theirs, and understood what a pain they are to use. As far as mice go, they're just another thing to have around. Are you going to carry it around with you? Once you get used to using fingers, using a mouse is going to become awkward. And if you prefer the mouse, because that's what you're used to, then you won't get proficient with multitouch.

At any rate, it's another way for Apple to force a new concept out. That's difficult to do when the old one is still hanging around.
post #167 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

It is also possible that they just did not think of it, or were lazy, or said at some point, 'let's go with what we have here than try to dot every i.'

Rumor had it that the iPad was in development for years. Not dotting an "I" doesn't make much sense if that were true.

Having thought about this for a while, if I buy an iPad and can't get used to the software keyboard, I'm likely to just eBay it rather than using a hardware keyboard. I have a laptop, after all. But that's just me.

Seems this thread has turned into general iPad discussion, rather than WSJ where it originally started. Sorry to be off-topic.
post #168 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

Rumor had it that the iPad was in development for years. Not dotting an "I" doesn't make much sense if that were true.

Having thought about this for a while, if I buy an iPad and can't get used to the software keyboard, I'm likely to just eBay it rather than using a hardware keyboard. I have a laptop, after all. But that's just me.

Seems this thread has turned into general iPad discussion, rather than WSJ where it originally started. Sorry to be off-topic.

It's ok. After a while, things can move off topic. Some threads initial topic has a limited discussion lifetime, and so we move somewhat off of it after a time as other things come to mind.

As not having a mouse could be a reason why some people won't buy this, it does tie into reasons for how many people are buying it now.
post #169 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

These are excellent observations.

It seems like something that Apple could have addressed (I already ordered the keyboard-dock......\)

I'd say it was addressed. They never added support for a mouse and never will because it goes against the entire reason to reengineer iPhone OS to be an efficient OS for touch-based computing.

Then there is the elephant in the room trying to add a single touch pointer to a UI designed from the ground up for multi-touch. To do any pinch and zoom you'd need an Option key on the keyboard which would make just using a mouse an issue in and of itself.

Everything we've seen from Apple to remove unneeded complications and requiring that mouse use also requires a keyboard or foregoing any pinch and zoom isn't something I'd expect from Apple.
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #170 of 197
In further regards to the mouse, this article sums it up, though it talks about more. I'll quote the relevant part, and give the link.

Quote:
Take the Photos app, for instance. On the iPad, Photos is what iPhoto would be if it had been built for a touch interface. The redesign needed to incorporate multitouch capabilities makes the application -- all such apps, in fact -- far more intuitive, natural and obvious to use than a mouse and keyboard could ever convey.

Apps, apps, apps
The same is true with the iPod app on the iPad (which sounds like a tongue-twister, I know). It's one thing to use iTunes with a mouse and keyboard, navigating and clicking your way through menus and song lists. It's another thing to use the iPod software on the iPad, where flicking your way through songs and videos seems more natural than doing it on a desktop computer. Suddenly, a mouse and keyboard feel like they get in the way of the whole computing experience.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...3&pageNumber=2
post #171 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You can't use a multitouch device with a mouse.

That may be true with Apple devices, but I have 2 capacitive multi-touch laptops that allow for use of either screen or input device gestures.

Maybe in the future Apple will allow (at least) the use of the Magic Mouse, given that it does feature multi-touch gestures.

Until then, this is a rather inelegant solution when using the keyboard dock, though it shouldn't be that much of a concern for the way the device is being marketed e.g. not really for serious work/productivity.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #172 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

That may be true with Apple devices, but I have 2 capacitive multi-touch laptops that allow for use of either screen or input device gestures.

The issue is not about capacitive or multi-touch HW, it's about a UI that was designed for touch-based computing. Windows was designed for a mouse and keyboard, just like Mac OS X.
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post #173 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

That may be true with Apple devices, but I have 2 capacitive multi-touch laptops that allow for use of either screen or input device gestures.

Maybe in the future Apple will allow (at least) the use of the Magic Mouse, given that it does feature multi-touch gestures.

Until then, this is a rather inelegant solution when using the keyboard dock, though it shouldn't be that much of a concern for the way the device is being marketed e.g. not really for serious work/productivity.

Yes. It's not designed for heavy work or productivity. At least, not yet.

I remember how people wailed when Apple came out with the GUI and mouse. The mouse was considered to be a productivity destroyer. Imagine, raising your hand from the keyboard to use a mouse, when you could just memorize hundreds of two and three character combinations that could be just typed out!

I suspect that this is being looked at the same way by some people.
post #174 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

In further regards to the mouse, this article sums it up, though it talks about more. I'll quote the relevant part, and give the link.



http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...3&pageNumber=2

Thanks...
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #175 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

If you're going to be typing for hours at a time, then you'd never do so on a tablet - why do people miss this point? Buy the right tool for the job - apple provide machines for a variety of tasks now from the iPod classic to the mac pro. This is a media consumption and light creation device - that's what is being sold as - why don't people simply open their minds and understand? If my four year old nephew gets it, my 63 year old mother gets it, then why does this minority of the supposedly tech community not?

It browses the web, plays music, checks emails, displays your photos, acts as an eBook reader, lets you play games and watch video. You can do some basic iWork creation on it.

It's really simple:

The iPod is a consumption device for games, apps, media
The iPhone is an iPod Touch with telephony functionality.
The MacBook is a laptop computer for media creation on the go
The Mac desktop range is for serious content creation.

and the iPad just joined the party somewhere between the iPod and the macBook.

Do try and keep up. Yes - it can't be used to edit 250meg high resolution photoshop files while rendering 3D graphics in the background. That is not a fault. It's a little like saying you can't put a nail into wood with a screwdriver - get with the plan, understand what this product is, who it is aimed at.

It's not a netbook replacement - Steve's very clear point was that nobody really wants a netbook - what they want is a cheap laptop. A netbook is just an under-spec'd laptop that doesn't do anything particularly well, because they tend to be crippled by slow processor running unnecessary processes (such as full OS when all people want to do is browse the web or listen to music/check email). The iPad was introduced to the market as a product to fill the gap between smart phone and laptop - not as a laptop or netbook or desktop computer replacement. It is a NEW product category. Do try and keep up. Some people simply do not need a fully blown computer - all they do is use facebook and email and like to listen to music. You don't need an iMac for that.

There are a lot of naysayers making themselves look very stupid because they can't understand a very simple concept which the non-tech community understand.

And yet people complain about netbooks. A netbook fills the same niche as the iPad (consumption and lite creation) - , and yet people (here as well as on other sites) constantly complain about them and denigrate them because they are not a full notebook replacement.
post #176 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouisTheXIV View Post

Good luck selling those predicted 20 million ipads by the end of the year Apple....

the hype for this thing was way way way bigger in the minds of the media than in the real world where most people see it for what it is: a $500 jumbo ipod touch. neither magical nor revolutionary. but very expensive.

Apple should still hit 5 million easily by end of year one for the iPad. Plenty of time and room to grow this nascent market.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #177 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by gchriste View Post

You are right, there is nothing revolutionary or magical about holding that HP desktop in your palm while surfing the net, reading ebooks and generally doing all mannor of things anywhere you want But hey, I guess it does have touch, must make the iPad look like a whimper piece of wanna be

Well said !
post #178 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

One would be the weight the keyboard adds to the dock, and the leverage of that weight from the keyboard projecting forwards. A friend who has both told me that the regular dock isn't as stable, though it's ok for charging. Poking the screen a bit has it moving..

Ah, excellent point. However it looked like it would be damn inconvenient to carry around and comments from several reviewers confirmed it's difficult to stuff in travel bags due to it's shape

I wonder if I could attach some folding legs to the bottom of a dock that could swing out to give it some more stability. Hmmm......

Of couse this means the cynically paranoid are going to pop up any day now and accuse Apple of being in cahoots wih accessory makers to force the creation of iPad/keyboard doc combo bags...
post #179 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.B. View Post

The iPad is certainly NOT all things to all people.

Thank god! Instead of being a mediocre solution for nothing much in particular for everyone it can (and does!) excel at being a very good device for some for it's targeted uses. For tasks that it's targeted at, it's going to be very hard to beat.
post #180 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.B. View Post

What would be wrong with a multitouch touchpad?

Like the iPad screen?
post #181 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post

Like the iPad screen?

Or like the touchpad they've been using for years?

Seriously, I think a touchpad with a visual output would be great for things like widgets, calculator, some Menu Bar items, stock ticker, Im announcement when working in another app. Of course there is a potential of making the touchpad less sensitivity if you do that so unless they can maintain the same functionality as a touchpad it currently has I'd say no, but this does look like an inevitable move.

PS: Dell has already experimented with it in their Adamo prototypes.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #182 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.B. View Post

You've never really used a recent-vintage, high-quality netbook, eh?

A good netbook will play video better than an iPad - in 720P widescreen, using the whole 10 inch screen instead of a small letterbox. They will support every codec made. You have an almost limitless variety of good-quality playback software to choose from - whatever layout and feature set you prefer, with many of them absolutely free. And you can connect to your TV using HDMI. For standalone use, it plays in stereo, instead of mono.

A good netbook will surf the web better than an iPad - and will be able to handle every type of web content, including Flash. They also give you the choice of browser: Any browser you want.

And you have the choice of OS: Win XP, Win 7, any flavor of Linux, even Mac OSX if that is what you like.

I have one, and it's junk. Everything's slow. Everything. It's also twice as heavy, much bulkier, and takes ages to recharge. I can't see much of an advantage, because most programs don't work well on it, and some won't even install.

There's a lot of promise to a netbook, even though they were never intended to do what you seem to think they're good at. Problem is that they don't do much of anything in actuality, even though, on paper, they can. There's a reason why so many have been taken back to the stores.

Apple isn't pretending that the iPad does everything. Yet, it does most of what a netbook actually does, while doing things that they don't. There is no way that some of the games out already for the iPad could be written to work on a netbook.

And with OS 4.0 arriving this summer, they will do much more. Next year's model will come with a much more powerful cpu and gpu as well. Third party software is already adding features it doesn't come with, and business software companies already have software out for it. We'll see much more.

As far as playing video, most netbooks have no more resolution than the iPad, and most have less.

Knock it all you want, but this will prove to be much more than you seem to want it to be.
post #183 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.B. View Post

What would be wrong with a multitouch touchpad?

I've already explained all that. Read the posts.
post #184 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh.B. View Post

Do you have a cite for that? "Almost unworkable"?

Other than FUD on fora, I've never seen nor heard that anywhere.

You don't read much if you haven't seen that.

I'll post a review of the new Archos for you though I posted it already. This is what we're going to see with other Windows 7 tablets. Enjoy!

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Review....html?x=0&.v=1
post #185 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

There's a reason why so many have been taken back to the stores.

I'm getting tired of hearing that. 38 million sold in 2009. A percent or two returned maybe? Say what you will about netbooks. They've been a hit!
post #186 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

I'm getting tired of hearing that. 38 million sold in 2009. A percent or two returned maybe? Say what you will about netbooks. They've been a hit!

I think it's likely the return the rate has dropped when MS offered WinXP and then Win7 came out, as Linux on these things is not the experience people wanted, but regardless of the return rate I have to wonder how many are utilizing them instead of just having buyers remorse with it sitting in a closet, being sold or given away.

We'll see how they fare this year with tablets hitting the market and, for the most part, vying for the same "limited computing marketshare" that both of the iPad and netbook are part of. If we see a dramatic drop in netbook sales over 2009 there will be clear inferences as to why.

The saving grace for netbooks may be Chrome OS as it is lightweight like Linux (since it is) and has the ease of use of what people do most of a consumption device. To early to tell, but this could be the first OS that could really eat away at MS' OS marketshare, albeit only at the lowest end of the scale
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post #187 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

I'm getting tired of hearing that. 38 million sold in 2009. A percent or two returned maybe? Say what you will about netbooks. They've been a hit!

No. Reports have been saying that as many as a third have been returned.

http://www.forbes.com/2009/05/21/net...partner=alerts

It's gotten somewhat better as more people realize that netbooks don't do that much, and so their expectations have dimmed. Which is why sales growth for netbooks have slowed.

And you can look that one up yourself.
post #188 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I think it's likely the return the rate has dropped when MS offered WinXP and then Win7 came out, as Linux on these things is not the experience people wanted, but regardless of the return rate I have to wonder how many are utilizing them instead of just having buyers remorse with it sitting in a closet, being sold or given away.

We'll see how they fare this year with tablets hitting the market and, for the most part, vying for the same "limited computing marketshare" that both of the iPad and netbook are part of. If we see a dramatic drop in netbook sales over 2009 there will be clear inferences as to why.

The saving grace for netbooks may be Chrome OS as it is lightweight like Linux (since it is) and has the ease of use of what people do most of a consumption device. To early to tell, but this could be the first OS that could really eat away at MS' OS marketshare, albeit only at the lowest end of the scale

It wasn't just that. It was the poor performance, and when people found out that an upgrade from basic to Home would cost them another 50 bucks.
post #189 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

No. Reports have been saying that as many as a third have been returned.

http://www.forbes.com/2009/05/21/net...partner=alerts

It's gotten somewhat better as more people realize that netbooks don't do that much, and so their expectations have dimmed. Which is why sales growth for netbooks have slowed.

And you can look that one up yourself.

Note that article is dated April, 2009 and says "Early on, confusion ... had led to return rates as high as 30% for netbooks last year."

edit: May, 2009, not April.

Popularity then exploded and 38 million were sold the following year, 2009. Got any return rates for 2009?

Growth is slowing but growth is still occurring. What will it be this year, 50 million?

I won't argue that netbooks are the best devices out there but they certainly are popular, despite what a few netbook haters say.
post #190 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

...but regardless of the return rate I have to wonder how many are utilizing them instead of just having buyers remorse with it sitting in a closet, being sold or given away.

That can be said about a lot of electronic toys. My iPod touch is pretty much permanently docked to my alarm clock. After a month of trying to use it for internet access, I gave up and relegated it to playing music two minutes a day.

I've bought a few camcorders over the years. Each got used about twice a year and sat in the closet the rest of the time.

Perhaps this will even happen with a few iPads.

The fact is, a netbook makes a great portable device for accessing the internet, among other things. Is it the best? No way. But I don't see any point in going around bad-mouthing netbooks all the time as some people do.
post #191 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

Note that article is dated April, 2009 and says "Early on, confusion ... had led to return rates as high as 30% for netbooks last year."

edit: May, 2009, not April.

Popularity then exploded and 38 million were sold the following year, 2009. Got any return rates for 2009?

Growth is slowing but growth is still occurring. What will it be this year, 50 million?

I won't argue that netbooks are the best devices out there but they certainly are popular, despite what a few netbook haters say.

I don't know the number this year, but it would be slowing anyway as we come out of the recession, and people go back to buying better machines. The iPad is also expected to bite into those sales.

I haven't looked for a later article, as that was the one I bookmarked. Returns aren't as bad now, as I said, and the article said, because people now know the limitations of netbooks. So people who would have bought them a year ago aren't buying them, leading to two things. One is the much slower growth rate, and two; lower returns.
post #192 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Undo Redo View Post

That can be said about a lot of electronic toys. My iPod touch is pretty much permanently docked to my alarm clock. After a month of trying to use it for internet access, I gave up and relegated it to playing music two minutes a day.

I've bought a few camcorders over the years. Each got used about twice a year and sat in the closet the rest of the time.

Perhaps this will even happen with a few iPads.

The fact is, a netbook makes a great portable device for accessing the internet, among other things. Is it the best? No way. But I don't see any point in going around bad-mouthing netbooks all the time as some people do.

The problem has to do with expectations. When a product is sold that gives people high expectations, and then falls well short, then there is a problem. While manufacturers were selling netbooks for the net experience, they kept silent as sales rose quickly during the recession as people's expectation rose on the usability of the devices.

Those enhanced expectations came about from wishful thinking on the part of people who wanted to buy a notebook, but who didn't have, or didn't want to spend the extra money for one. So they convinced themselves that a netbook, especially the more expensive ones, such as the one I bought my daughter for her summer school, where she only wanted the internet, IM, Skype, etc., would substitute.

But many people were buying them to run programs they couldn't run; games they couldn't play, networking speeds they didn't have, etc. So then they were returned because they couldn't do the things they weren't designed to do, but that people wanted them to do.

It's not a matter of putting down netbooks. They are what they are. But it's the perception that because they have an Atom chip, run Windows, and have a few ports, that they can do so much more. They can't.

It's a matter of being honest about it. Companies kept mum, even though they knew that consumers were making a bad choice, because netbook sales during the recession were, in many cases, the only thing giving them steady sales as the sales of their more expensive (and profitable) notebooks dropped.
post #193 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The problem has to do with expectations. When a product is sold that gives people high expectations, and then falls well short, then there is a problem. While manufacturers were selling netbooks for the net experience, they kept silent as sales rose quickly during the recession as people's expectation rose on the usability of the devices.

Those enhanced expectations came about from wishful thinking on the part of people who wanted to buy a notebook, but who didn't have, or didn't want to spend the extra money for one. So they convinced themselves that a netbook, especially the more expensive ones, such as the one I bought my daughter for her summer school, where she only wanted the internet, IM, Skype, etc., would substitute.

But many people were buying them to run programs they couldn't run; games they couldn't play, networking speeds they didn't have, etc. So then they were returned because they couldn't do the things they weren't designed to do, but that people wanted them to do.

It's not a matter of putting down netbooks. They are what they are. But it's the perception that because they have an Atom chip, run Windows, and have a few ports, that they can do so much more. They can't.

It's a matter of being honest about it. Companies kept mum, even though they knew that consumers were making a bad choice, because netbook sales during the recession were, in many cases, the only thing giving them steady sales as the sales of their more expensive (and profitable) notebooks dropped.

Good response.

I guess my expectations weren't as high as the people to whom you refer. I bought a netbook in late 2008 and remain happy with it. I have other computers for doing higher end stuff.

My old 2006 MacBook was so heavy and hot, I used the netbook a lot more for couch surfing, etc. Recently I got an aluminum MBP and use the netbook less. I still take the netbook whenever I travel because it's lighter, easier to pack and less fragile than the MBP. It's very handy and does everything I need it to do without any problems. So I'm a little baffled and offended when people say netbooks are junk.

I might buy an iPad at some point. I haven't tried one yet but I'm doubtful I'm going to find it more convenient or easy to use than the netbook. I am convinced I'll like the display better but that might be all.
post #194 of 197
Four days, and I still can't get used to this tiny keyboard. I'm a petite woman and my fingers still hit the wrong keys. I have to look to verify I'm on the right keys. Someone suggested an external keyboard, but that seems silly. I'm beginning to think I should have gotten a netbook, but I'm hoping I can get used to what is really no keyboard. How long do you think it will take to adjust, if at all? I'm sorry to vent, but I'm frustrated. This is my first Apple product and I guess I expected more with all the hype.
post #195 of 197
If you learned to touch-type, the iPad keyboard a bigger adjustment then if you are a hunt and peck or thumb typer. I am in the process of learning to allow my fingers to hover over the home row, and type more slowly than I am used to with a mechanical keyboard, which helps. I suggest you keep with it for a few days or even weeks.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #196 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by 222wekebu View Post

Four days, and I still can't get used to this tiny keyboard. I'm a petite woman and my fingers still hit the wrong keys. I have to look to verify I'm on the right keys. Someone suggested an external keyboard, but that seems silly. I'm beginning to think I should have gotten a netbook, but I'm hoping I can get used to what is really no keyboard. How long do you think it will take to adjust, if at all? I'm sorry to vent, but I'm frustrated. This is my first Apple product and I guess I expected more with all the hype.

If you thought you'd be writing novels on the iPad keyboard you expected too much. It's really for light typing only, I would say. That said, i netbook keyboard stinks too due to its small size, and doesn't have any auto-correction like the iPad. If you're stationary when typing, and doing a lot of it, look into a little bluetooth keyboard. Otherwise, try watching your fingers instead of your words when you type. That might help.
post #197 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by 222wekebu View Post

Four days, and I still can't get used to this tiny keyboard. I'm a petite woman and my fingers still hit the wrong keys. I have to look to verify I'm on the right keys. Someone suggested an external keyboard, but that seems silly. I'm beginning to think I should have gotten a netbook, but I'm hoping I can get used to what is really no keyboard. How long do you think it will take to adjust, if at all? I'm sorry to vent, but I'm frustrated. This is my first Apple product and I guess I expected more with all the hype.

Everyone is different:

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2362063,00.asp

http://gizmodo.com/5509265/ipad-test...-and-keyboards

http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/03/e...uctivity-tool/

The keyboard in horizontal mode isn't really that small. The keys are almost full size. Most netbook keyboards are as small, or even smaller than this, though they do have more keys.

Virtual keyboards are different, and it can take a bit of time to get used to. If you fight it, it will be more difficult. But virtual keyboards are still new, and people are used to buttons. This is considered to be one of the best virtual models available, but if you can't get used to it then you might have to try another way. In the beginning of mouse use, some people couldn't get used to that either, and before them, they couldn't get used to memorizing hundreds of two and three letter combos.

I wouldn't blame Apple, and I wouldn't blame you. Some things don't mesh.
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