or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › First Look: iPad
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First Look: iPad

post #1 of 102
Thread Starter 
Apple's iPad scales the iPhone OS up to a 1024x768 resolution, 9.7" screen. But this device isn't just a larger iPod touch; it has been given a series of unique features (some of which are likely to show up in future iPhone and iPods) and new level of hardware and software sophistication.

Hardware: the display

Physically, the iPad is much larger than the iPhone; more so than I had originally anticipated. I'd handled the iPad at the original launch event, but had in mind that the screen was about four times as large as Apple's existing mobile devices.

In reality, the iPhone's screen could fit within the iPad's about two and a half times in either direction. In terms of surface area, the iPad's screen is 45 square inches compared to the iPhone's 5.78 square inch display, making the screen nearly 8 times as large, physically (7.8x).

In terms of resolution, the iPad delivers 1024x768 (786,432 pixels) compared to the iPhone's 480x320 (153,600 pixels), which is 5.12 times greater. This means the iPad's screen has less screen density than previous iPhone OS devices (132 dpi compared to the iPhone and iPod touch's 163 dpi screen), but still more than a MacBook (110 dpi) or iMac (108 dpi).

Out of the box, the glossy display works as a mirror. With the display turned on, the gloss isn't too bad, and much like an iPhone (but not a MacBook), it's usually not too difficult to adjust your viewing angle to avoid sources of glare.

Touch control of the screen is accurate and fast to the point that the iPad's richly animated screen feels alive and natural, not like a machine that's calculating a response for you. With its larger display, you'll more readily notice subtle details that are present on the iPhone but that never jumped out before, such as the way objects bounce to a stop.

Browse AppleInsider's High-quality unboxing photos of Apple's new iPad.

Hardware: the physics

Apart from its familiar Dock Connector, headphone jack with mic/remote support (there's no bundled headphones), Home, power, and volume toggle switch that are all identical to the iPhone, the iPad also has a screen orientation lock (but there's no mute switch).

This comes in handy because the device swaps its orientation wildly as you turn it in 360 degree loops. Particularly when lying down, being able stop the screen from reorienting is a welcome feature, and one I'd like to see on the iPhone, too.

The iPad is so thin (and looks even thinner than it is, thanks to its beveled edges) that it feels heavier than one might expect. It's only a pound and a half, so it's certainly no heavyweight, but it does have a solid, weighty feel. Compared to a similar devices, iPad weighs very little. UMPC devices were typically about 2 pounds, while the CrunchPad/JooJoo is 2.4 pounds.

The iPad has a familiarity that it shouldn't. It's new, but it feels like it has been around for some time. It feels polished through several years of refinement, and nothing about how it works makes you consult a new user's manual. This is a remarkable feat for its designers. Nothing so artificial and synthetic should immediately seem so natural and organic, but iPad does.

At the same time, iPad is solidly rigid. There's no flex at all, despite its thinness and relatively large form factor. The device seems to ask you to handle it with delicate care, but it's really designed to withstand pretty rough treatment.

Another realization you'll make quickly: Apple didn't design iPad to be a way not to sell Macs anymore. In fact, it's not only just not a notebook replacement, but actually requires being plugged into an iTunes computer before you do anything on it, just like an iPod touch (below, what you see when you turn it on).

Unlike earlier iPhone OS devices however, the new device only syncs over standard USB; it needs more power than that specification can deliver to actually charge. USB 2.0 only provides 2.5 watts for devices to pull in order to recharge their batteries. The iPad's power adapter (in the shape of USB; it looks like the old iPhone adapters, or like a mini MacBook power supply) provides 10 watts. So unless your system's USB ports were specially designed to put out 10 watts (and most if not all weren't), you'll need to charge your iPad using the supplied adapter, and not an iPhone one or a typical PC USB jack. Fortunately, the iPad's battery lasts a long time.



Hardware: WiFi

iPad sports WiFi and Bluetooth just like the iPhone, but it's not like the iPhone at all. For starters, iPad's WiFi supports fast 802.11 n networks, which are not just speedier also deliver greater range and potentially less interference because they can be set up in the mostly virgin 5GHz band.

I had no problem connecting iPad to my "n-only," 5GHz Time Capsule WiFi network, although it only connected at 150 mbps signal rate (my MacBook and iMac will connect using both available bands to achieve a theoretical 300 mbps connection, as shown below). However, even at 150, the iPad is much faster than an iPhone connecting to the 802.11 a/b/g compatible network, which only achieves a theoretical maximum data rate of 54 mbps.

Future versions of the iPhone and iPod touch will likely also gain hardware support for for 802.11 n networks, but there's no way to add retroactive support in software.

Note that the WiFi iPad, like the iPod touch, does not have real GPS; it uses WiFi triangulation for Location Services, which is less accurate. The 3G version of the iPad will provide GPS just like the iPhone, because this feature is related to the mobile chipset (the 3G mobile network is used to assist the calculation of GPS information).



Hardware: Bluetooth

The iPad's Bluetooth is also a notch above the iPhone in important ways. For starters, you can associate iPad with wireless keyboards, which work around the issue of needing to type large amounts of text directly onto the screen's virtual keyboard. (The screen shot below shows Bluetooth's simple settings, which make discovering and connecting to an available keyboard very easy).

This works well, and most Bluetooth keyboards will even wake the screen directly. Apple's Bluetooth keyboards can also set the screen brightness, adjust volume, and skip and pause iPod playback. However, after you connect to an available Bluetooth keyboard, you'll have to power the keyboard off (or manually disconnect) in order to be able to bring up a virtual keyboard. Simply walking away from your keyboard doesn't do the trick.

Turn the keyboard back on, and iPad immediately dismissed the virtual keyboard and re-associates with your external keyboard. On the other hand, while iPad offered to connect to my MacBook via Bluetooth, it simply couldn't. Apple also doesn't support printers or other Bluetooth profiles which it potentially could, outside of A2DP stereo headphones.



Hardware: Audio

The iPad's built in speaker is loud, much more so than the iPhone's. And it sounds good, surprisingly good given that it fits inside this thin metal box and emanates from three tiny grills on the bottom right corner.

Unlike the iPhone, you're less likely to have you hand covering the audio holes, which is often an irritation when trying to play iPhone games. This makes for an engaging experience with video games, in playing movies or TV, or in simply listening to your music collection.

With the volume cranked, you can feel vibration in the back housing of the unit. It doesn't feel cheep and rattling; it feels like a sensory extension of your music into your hands. If you don't like this, or if the other people in the library don't like your liking this, you can plug in your own pair of headphones and enjoy your music all to yourself.

Software

The in-depth review will cover more of the details about how iPad actually works, but a first look reveals that iPad isn't just a big iPod touch. The vast new screen real estate enables much richer and sophisticated interfaces, all while bringing forward both the familiar conventions of the iPhone OS as well as incorporating desktop concepts such as the layout of iTunes or Mail.

Even apps that are primarily just bigger in terms of doing the same thing with more screen real estate, such as the client for Google Maps and the Safari browser, transform from being just awesome on the iPhone into being magical on iPad, thanks to the increase in available data to consume in one eyeful as you engage the world's map and Internet with your full hand.

Apple's free iBooks app, which recommends itself upon first visit to the App Store, bundles a copy of "Winnie-the-Pooh," which sucked me into paging through an entire chapter before I realized I was reading a children's book, even if it is a cleverly written classic.

Other apps, from Apple's iWork productivity suite to the simple Notes (shown below), unlock an entirely new level of sophistication over anything seen on the iPhone, if only because you can now lay down your mobile screen, pick up your Bluetooth keyboard and begin gushing text directly into the screen without dealing with the errors or mistaken corrections of the iPhone OS' virtual keyboard.

To those who are proud to have coined the idea that "the iPhone OS is all about consuming information rather than creating anything": maybe you need to dig a little deeper. Even without a physical keyboard, the hands-on touch features of iPad are clearly creating all sorts of ways to build original content.

This is a new frontier of computing waiting to be defined, unlocked and fully exploited. Based on our PR announcement feed, there's an enthusiastic bunch of developers working to do that. And those apps are going to add tremendous amounts of value to the platform Apple has created.



Stay tuned for AppleInsider's in-depth review of iPad. Previous features related to the system:

Inside Apple's iPad: Adobe Flash
Inside Apple's iPad: Multitasking
Inside Apple's iPad: iPhone OS vs Mac OS X
Inside Apple's iPad: the A4 processor
post #2 of 102
A very good review, something I and others have been waiting for.


Quote:
At the same time, iPad is solidly rigid. There's no flex at all, despite its thinness and relatively large form factor. The device seems to ask you to handle it with delicate care, but it's really designed to withstand pretty rough treatment.

EXCELLENT!!


Quote:
Another realization you'll make quickly: Apple didn't design iPad to be a way not to sell Macs anymore. In fact, it's not only just not a notebook replacement, but actually requires being plugged into an iTunes computer before you do anything on it, just like an iPod Touch (below, what you see when you turn it on).

I'm glad this matter was resolved.




A question I have is how responsive is the touchscreen to detailed input?

For instance there is a stylus for the iPhone, would it work to draw fine lines and detail on the iPad? Or is the response zones too separated?

Thank you for your intelligent responses.


Don't feed the trolls!
post #3 of 102
What I like best is the keyboard is a LOT easier to use than i would have imagined. Much less of a learning curve compared to the iPhone (thumbs get in the way). And it passed the important "not look at screen to type" test with amazing accuracy.

You almost don't even need the external keyboard for most typing sessions.
post #4 of 102
To those who are proud to have coined the idea that "the iPhone OS is all about consuming information rather than creating anything": maybe you need to dig a little deeper. Even without a physical keyboard, the hands-on touch features of iPad are clearly creating all sorts of ways to build original content.

An important point. iWork has already been given the touch treatment. Expect to see more productivity apps (and some entirely new ones) designed specifically for the iPad. The possibilities are legion.
post #5 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

What I like best is the keyboard is a LOT easier to use than i would have imagined. Much less of a learning curve compared to the iPhone (thumbs get in the way). And it passed the important "not look at screen to type" test with amazing accuracy.

You almost don't even need the external keyboard for most typing sessions.


Yes, the keys on the iPad seem to have the same area space as normal keys, just less of them.

When you type with all fingers, do you need to keep your fingers up and off?

Or can you rest them a little without activating?
post #6 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

This is a new frontier of computing waiting to be defined, unlocked and fully exploited....

The earth shook today.

Oh, and netbooks are toast.
post #7 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by
Thank you for your intelligent responses. :)


[i


Don't feed the trolls![/i]

One thing with the original post, assisted GPS is not "fake" GPS. It's real GPS, just faster to start up with the WiFi triangulation. You can turn WiFi off and your GPS on an iPhone still works. In fact my WiFi has completely died on my not quite 2 years old iPhone 3G and the GPS works fine although it takes longer when I first use it and a lot longer if I have had the phone in airplane mode and change location so much the GPS needs to find new triangulation points in orbit all by itself (since it can't get the WiFi triangulation assist with a dead WiFi transmitter/receiver).
post #8 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post

Yes, the keys on the iPad seem to have the same area space as normal keys, just less of them.

When you type with all fingers, do you need to keep your fingers up and off?

Or can you rest them a little without activating?

You can't rest them a little. They have to be up and off. I'm finding myself using the pointing and middle finger on both hands if I want to get speed and accuracy. I'm getting used to it, but it's taken a couple of hours with the device.
post #9 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

To those who are proud to have coined the idea that "the iPhone OS is all about consuming information rather than creating anything": maybe you need to dig a little deeper. Even without a physical keyboard, the hands-on touch features of iPad are clearly creating all sorts of ways to build original content.

An important point. iWork has already been given the touch treatment. Expect to see more productivity apps (and some entirely new ones) designed specifically for the iPad. The possibilities are legion.

While I agree that the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch can certainly be used for creation and not just consumption, I think the dictum is accurate and I think it's clear that Apple intends for the iPad to be an accessory device, not to replace your PC.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #10 of 102
This doesn't apply to anyone here, but to those who persist in using "this is nothing but a big iPod Touch" cliche, consider this. One might as well critique the truck by saying that it is nothing more than a large car. While they both have all the same basic components and structure, would we really want to scrap trucks because we have cars? Sometimes scaling up allows you to do some things better.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #11 of 102
When you get a chance, you might want to see if the iPad works with the mini Bluetooth-compliant keyboards that are being sold on eBay for about $20. They're much more compact than a standard Bluetooth keyboard. For those used to typing with their thumbs, just about everyone under the age of thirty, they should work quite well.
post #12 of 102
That's too bad about not being able to print over bluetooth. When I buy one of these I'll make that plunge into getting wireless (via wi-fi) printer. That'll be a must have.
post #13 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

...to those who persist in using "this is nothing but a big iPod Touch" cliche, consider this. One might as well critique the truck by saying that it is nothing more than a large car. ... Sometimes scaling up allows you to do some things better.

Good analogy. To add, the iPad has more "horsepower" under the hood
post #14 of 102
IMHO the iPad is heavy--and not because it's "thin". To use it standing up, one hand needs to support the device while the other hand pokes around. Since the supporting hand is going to bear the whole weight and will usually be one's non-dominant hand, this quickly becomes tiresome. The solution is of course to set the iPad on a table or in one's lap, but the thought of using it while carrying it (perhaps with the added weight of a case) is unappealing.

The iWork apps feel minimalistic.

At least in one incarnation of the iPad's virtual keyboard I tried, the delete key is in a different location than on the iPhone.

I am saddened that the debut of the iPad has been accompanied by price hikes in a variety of e-subscriptions.
post #15 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

While I agree that the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch can certainly be used for creation and not just consumption, I think the dictum is accurate and I think it's clear that Apple intends for the iPad to be an accessory device, not to replace your PC.

I'm hoping some of the remote desktop/vnc applications will open the iPad up for serious computing for me. I already use my iphone to vnc into my main workstation and perform simple tasks, but the screen size of the phone has always been too limiting for real work. Have you seen wormhole remote? It's not available yet, but it proposes to present a layer of abstraction to present remote applications in a user friendly fashion on the iPad. This device opens up a world of opportunities as a thin client.
post #16 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

IMHO the iPad is heavy--and not because it's "thin". To use it standing up, one hand needs to support the device while the other hand pokes around. Since the supporting hand is going to bear the whole weight and will usually be one's non-dominant hand, this quickly becomes tiresome.

HOLY SHMOKES! I called this 2 months ago! (see this thread)

I "rest" my case!!
post #17 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Apple intends for the iPad to be an accessory device, not to replace your PC.

Oh we'll get there.
post #18 of 102
I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.
post #19 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.

Adapters vs. unsightly holes.

Not an easy decision to make.
post #20 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

I'm hoping some of the remote desktop/vnc applications will open the iPad up for serious computing for me.

I watched a demo of one a few days ago that looked pretty good. I don't know what it was called though.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #21 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Oh we'll get there.

I'm not seeing it. I can't see a 10" device replacing a 13" to 30"+ PC display. I think are too many revolutions to be had before a tablet will be considered over a PC the way notebooks are now considered over desktops.


Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.

It has USB, but what standardized USB port did you want? USB-A, USB-B, Mini-USB or Micro-USB? And what do you need it for?
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #22 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

I'm hoping some of the remote desktop/vnc applications will open the iPad up for serious computing for me. I already use my iphone to vnc into my main workstation and perform simple tasks, but the screen size of the phone has always been to limiting for real work. Have you seen wormhole remote? It's not available yet, but it proposes to present a layer of obstruction to present remote applications in a user friendly fashion on the iPad. This device opens up a world of opportunities as a thin client.

If Jaadu VNC is available for the iPad. . .
post #23 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.


I thought there was a adapter?

Have you tried a male/male adapter to the supplied cable?
post #24 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.

It connects to your computers USB port and allows you to input files to and from the applications on your computer via iTunes. The 3rd party applications I use like goodreader also grab content from MobileMe, google docs and urls. A lot of people use 3rd party tools like drop box to sync their content from all their devices. People are also coming up with new products like airstash to seamlessly transfer files between computers and mobile devices. I personally don't see the need to connect this to a USB drive. I have a main computer that is connected to the USB drive. I connect my mobile devices to my main computer and get the content.
post #25 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.

I'll add these to previous suggestions:

(1) Apple doesn't have the developer resources necessary to prepare the numerous drivers that would be required by product launch time;

(2) better device lock-down.

(3) Apple doesn't want people attaching external disks anyway: access methods and drivers are required; better motivation to buy a model with more internal storage; more motivation to upgrade sooner.

(4) A standard USB interface is "open", whereas the iPod connector must be licensed from Apple.
post #26 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post

I thought there was a adapter?

Have you tried a male/male adapter to the supplied cable?

Spoton, come on now. You know the iPad won't connect to a USB drive.
post #27 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'm not seeing it. I can't see a 10" device replacing a 13" to 30"+ PC display. I think are too many revolutions to be had before a tablet will be considered over a PC the way notebooks are now considered over desktops.



It has USB, but what standardized USB port did you want? USB-A, USB-B, Mini-USB or Micro-USB? And what do you need it for?


As far as I can tell the USB is only for importing photos- with an adapter. Just put a dang USB port on it and you can move files around effortlessly...seriously. What would that cost them 50 cents?!
post #28 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

You can't rest them a little. They have to be up and off. I'm finding myself using the pointing and middle finger on both hands if I want to get speed and accuracy. I'm getting used to it, but it's taken a couple of hours with the device.


Ok, cool thanks
post #29 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

If Jaadu VNC is available for the iPad. . .

I've been staring at desktop connect a vnc client for ipad for 15 minutes now. http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/deskt...364907570?mt=8

I haven't pulled the trigger. Has anyone used it yet?
post #30 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

I still can't understand how this thing doesn't have a USB port...

Seriously I don't get it.

Seriously, if you really need USB, get the iPod connector adapter for those times when you need USB.

One less opening into the case. Which, come to think of it, could have some EMI consequences.

But esthetics likely is a bit more of a factor.
post #31 of 102
I have been bamboozled by Steve.

I can't believe he had the audacity to state that it is a dream to type on

It is an amazing product but if you bought iWork to be productive with the device, think again

The idea and I guess brilliant execution of multitouch iWork defies gravity but the virtual keyboard is a piece of CRAP

Actually on a second thought, it is in fact a DREAM to type on if u are coming from an iPhone and trust me I will defend the iPhone keyboard any day because I think it's the best we will ever get at that size

The ipad v keyboard is very accurate once you give up all hope trying to touch type on it.

I find I type really fast and accurate on it using just two fingers (left and right middle fingers) when it is on my lap or laid flat on my bed of course but it gets tiring and frustrating really quick

But it is a PIPE DREAM to be "productive" with pages/iWork without a real physical keyboard and trust me it is a bag of hurt for those on the fence because of the ipads apparent lack of "mobile" productivity

again it lacks "Mobile" productivity. As u can see I stressed the word "mobile".

And guess what? I typed this post on the iPad virtual keyboard and it was a bag of hurt after spending 20 mins now on what shud have taken 5 min
post #32 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

This doesn't apply to anyone here, but to those who persist in using "this is nothing but a big iPod Touch" cliche, consider this. One might as well critique the truck by saying that it is nothing more than a large car. While they both have all the same basic components and structure, would we really want to scrap trucks because we have cars? Sometimes scaling up allows you to do some things better.

Very good analogy. I worked out a similar analogy for both the questions :

It is just a big iPod Touch ?
= Is dinner plate just a big saucer ?

Why would I need iPad when I can do everything with my MacBook ?
= Why do I need dinner plate when I could eat in my frying pan ?

iPod is a fail. It does not have USB, or filesystem as my macbook ?
Dinner plate is a fail. It does not have handle or teflon coating like my frying pan ?

Here is a detailed post if you like the analogy
http://srujan.org/wordpress/2010/04/...-dinner-plate/

-satyakam
You are not in the Matrix. You ARE the Matrix. (And there are no controlling machines, simulators or the real world)
Reply
You are not in the Matrix. You ARE the Matrix. (And there are no controlling machines, simulators or the real world)
Reply
post #33 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankie View Post

As far as I can tell the USB is only for importing photos- with an adapter. Just put a dang USB port on it and you can move files around effortlessly...seriously. What would that cost them 50 cents?!

The iPad is a mobile appliance and apple is treating it as such. You can move files on and off of the device using iTunes.
post #34 of 102
This is sweet...

... Typed on my iPad, while lying in bed!

.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
Reply
post #35 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dagamer34 View Post

What I like best is the keyboard is a LOT easier to use than i would have imagined. Much less of a learning curve compared to the iPhone (thumbs get in the way). And it passed the important "not look at screen to type" test with amazing accuracy.

You almost don't even need the external keyboard for most typing sessions.

dagamer34 what are u smoking? I would like some of it because u sure must be having a PIPE DREAM to think/phantom the idea of touch typing on the virtual keyboard or perhaps you u got chicken fingers. Hope u get my message and can also take a joke.

Even God, the creator of man and man the creator of iPad - even God can't touch type on the damn virtual keyboard. Well with GOD all things are possible so perhaps only GOD is capable of being productive/typing with the virtual keyboard if u get my gist
post #36 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by surefire View Post

I have been bamboozled by Steve.

I can't believe he had the audacity to state that it is a dream to type on

It is an amazing product but if you bought iWork to be productive with the device, think again

The idea and I guess brilliant execution of multitouch iWork defies gravity but the virtual keyboard is a piece of CRAP

Actually on a second thought, it is in fact a DREAM to type on if u are coming from an iPhone and trust me I will defend the iPhone keyboard any day because I think it's the best we will ever get at that size

The ipad v keyboard is very accurate once you give up all hope trying to touch type on it.

I find I type really fast and accurate on it using just two fingers (left and right middle fingers) when it is on my lap or laid flat on my bed of course but it gets tiring and frustrating really quick

But it is a PIPE DREAM to be "productive" with pages/iWork without a real physical keyboard and trust me it is a bag of hurt for those on the fence because of the ipads apparent lack of "mobile" productivity

again it lacks "Mobile" productivity. As u can see I stressed the word "mobile".

And guess what? I typed this post on the iPad virtual keyboard and it was a bag of hurt after spending 20 mins now on what shud have taken 5 min

I don't recall apple marketing this as a dream to type on. From what I understand for times when you need to do serious typing it's suggested you pair up a bluetooth keyboard or use the keyboard dock. I've seen my ability to type on this keyboard improving drastically over time. I hope you experience the same effect.
post #37 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

I don't recall apple marketing this as a dream to type on. From what I understand for times when you need to do serious typing it's suggested you pair up a bluetooth keyboard or use the keyboard dock. I've seen my ability to type on this keyboard improving drastically over time. I hope you experience the same effect.

Thanks for the words of encouragement and yes u are right I too have improved my typing with time but one still needs "the real thing" to be productive.

Oh by the way he really did say those words while he was presenting the keynote. He was sited on the couch with the iPad in his laps and he was demonstrating the keyboard while sending an email to a fellow worker. I shud have suspected then when he quickly-with the speed of light- glanced over that particular feature ( typing) of course...

Actually I have effectively doubled my speed on the just typing this reply.

But u still know where I stand

It might be a subjective thing. I suggest everyone go to apple/best buy store and try it out them selves and decide for them selves but keep in mind that with practice comes perfect and speed so I wouldn't base judgement solely on the first encounter

Look at the iPhone. We have all been trained to type on it now after about 2 years now
post #38 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post

Yes, the keys on the iPad seem to have the same area space as normal keys, just less of them.

When you type with all fingers, do you need to keep your fingers up and off?

Or can you rest them a little without activating?

I find I can only type fast and accurate using two fingers only (left and right middle Fingers) or whatever suites you

Or go one handed. U will be surprised how fast and accurate you can type with one finger and one hand just don't expect touch typing speeds
post #39 of 102
If you could mount a thumb drive to an iPad, how would you be able to see it's contents? There's no Finder. There will be no Finder on the iPad.

But when the iPad shows up in iTunes, you can drag Keynote files to an iPad Keynote folder on the iPad, Pages to Pages, Numbers to Numbers. Haven't seen any reports for any other apps yet, but the theory is that any app can turn on this capability.

Andy Ithnatko on a Fox.com Strategy Session, Gadgets and Games online broadcast stated he could type over 50 WPM. Money was laid on the table. Andy demonstrated his speed on camera. Andy's had his iPad for over a week.

Just like the iPhone, it will take users a few days to get up to speed on the virtual keyboard. I know I spent a couple of hours with a typing program on the iPod touch and dramatically increased my speed.
post #40 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by surefire View Post

Thanks for the words of encouragement and yes u are right I too have improved my typing with time but one still needs "the real thing" to be productive.

Oh by the way he really did say those words while he was presenting the keynote. He was sited on the couch with the iPad in his laps and he was demonstrating the keyboard while sending an email to a fellow worker. I shud have suspected then when he quickly-with the speed of light- glanced over that particular feature ( typing) of course...

Actually I have effectively doubled my speed on the just typing this reply.

But u still know where I stand

It might be a subjective thing. I suggest everyone go to apple/best buy store and try it out them selves and decide for them selves but keep in mind that with practice comes perfect and speed so I wouldn't base judgement solely on the first encounter

Look at the iPhone. We have all been trained to type on it now after about 2 years now

He did say it was a dream to type on. I must have blocked it out with all the other superlatives he was using. Did you purchase the apple case? I'm finding the incline it provides helps a lot.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Current Mac Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › First Look: iPad