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Apple iPad owners report Wi-Fi connection issues - Page 2

post #41 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

I've been posting about the issues with Wi-Fi for at least 2 years on this forum. WiFi is not all it's cracked up to being. Now i don't yet have an iPad (waiting for the 3G) but my iphone 3G has very spotty problems with WiFi. Way too slow, to many users, diffuclty loggin on when they are web-based and not just account based. Panera has finally shapped up thier WiFi but others are still forcing you to log on through a website that has to remain open for you to use. The ATT free WiFi is worthless. Plus you can't use it in the car (yet). The only GOOD WiFi i've been able to use is my router at home. Now i hope i won't have the problem some have when you use both the iPhone and iPad at the same time, but we'll see. I just hope some of these bugs get fixed by the time i purchase mine. I'm waiting to see what the Chrome OS machines turn out to be (due out in the fall), but i'm affriad they will be a joke compared to the iPad.

Do you really expect wifi hotspots (especially free once) to be as good as your home broadband?
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post #42 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by nishin View Post

Just for the record, a PC sitting next to my Mac can detect far more networks in a given area, compared to a Mac. Why ?? Is the Mac's WiFi implementation inferior ? How were they able to pass and retain WiFi certification ????

Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.
post #43 of 151
Well I know that I can't get on MANY (To many) wi-fi connections with my Mac laptop, when it shouldn't be an issue? Maybe what ever causes that problem is the same with the iPad.

I say this, because my girl friends room mates can get on the 4 wi-fi connections (with her PC) in her neighborhood, (Starbucks, Mr. Bagels & 2 small diners), while I can't get on them with my laptop (MBP 17").

This isn't a one time thing either. We all go to these places regularly and I'll have my laptop, and can't get on, but she gets right on with her PC (which she REALLY loves to rub in).

I can get on other wi-fi's in the area MOST of the time, but not all?

I can see the connections, but can't get on?

Skip
post #44 of 151
I have had no issues either, even my wife can use it with little to no help!
post #45 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post

Why? Is it unreasonable for people to want a company to properly and thoroughly test their products before they release them onto retail stores? I don't think it's unreasonable at all. Is it a common practice among manufacturers now? Unfortunately, no. But SHOULD it be? Yes! And it's certainly not "asinine" for us to want it.

Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will be issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.
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post #46 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.

Actually, the wifi antenna is centered on the plastic apple logo on the back of the iPad.
post #47 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.

If that's the case, shouldn't the problem be universal, not just some batches?
post #48 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.

I suppose I'll spell it out for you...

I don't suggest they open every box. I'm saying if there is a design flaw in this device that causes it to not work as well as it could/should, then the device functionality/design should have been tested before it was produced, boxed, and shipped to stores, smart-ass.
post #49 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

Well I know that I can't get on MANY (To many) wi-fi connections with my Mac laptop, when it shouldn't be an issue? Maybe what ever causes that problem is the same with the iPad.

I say this, because my girl friends room mates can get on the 4 wi-fi connections (with her PC) in her neighborhood, (Starbucks, Mr. Bagels & 2 small diners), while I can't get on them with my laptop (MBP 17").

This isn't a one time thing either. We all go to these places regularly and I'll have my laptop, and can't get on, but she gets right on with her PC (which she REALLY loves to rub in).

I can get on other wi-fi's in the area MOST of the time, but not all?

I can see the connections, but can't get on?

Skip

Why restarting ur laptop is such a problem for all of u? Anythig doesn't work properly RESTART! dont tell me u r not used to that fact . ur not kids and not using a computer for the first day. it only takes about 2 minutes on models released since 2008. And Windows has the same problem but before 7 it took a year to restart any pc laptop.
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post #50 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.

Them stoopid moroons at Apple done gone and done it agin. Nutjobs went and designed a case without thinkin' one bit about that thar antenny for the wareless. What kinda goofus don't slap some plastic on thar to make sure them lil photons or whatever they is ken git from the laptop antenny to the base thingy antenny?

No really. I'm sure that they didn't do any signal interference checking based on the protypes with the aluminum enclosure at all. Nope. There isn't a single engineer at Apple that understands radio technology, or how to position and cover a WiFi antenna. Apple has failed utterly to understand and speak to a basic technology for the last decade. Insightful and cutting observation sir! Yes indeed!
post #51 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post

Why? Is it unreasonable for people to want a company to properly and thoroughly test their products before they release them onto retail stores? I don't think it's unreasonable at all. Is it a common practice among manufacturers now? Unfortunately, no. But SHOULD it be? Yes! And it's certainly not "asinine" for us to want it.

Take digital cameras for a slightly off-topic example: In the late 1990s, so few models were released each year, the makers took more time to test them. You almost never heard of models hitting store shelves with defects. Today, each maker poops out 2 dozen models a year or more - you hear of defective lenses, dust inside the lenses when you get them, feature glitches, sensor glitches, etc etc.. all because they are not properly tested before released. The same goes for every computer maker including Apple - they are so worried about profit and getting stuff out as quick as possible, they're using US to "test" the models for them, instead of doing it themselves... and no, it's not right.

Do many consumer electronics have defects in them these days? Yes. Is it asinine for us to expect better quality? No. We have but two ways however, to make this well known and heard to the manufacturers - don't buy the stuff when it first hits shelves, and when the first sign of any issue comes up, don't bother with waiting for firmware fixes or spending your $$ to ship them back to be repaired - just take it back for a refund and make the manufacturer deal with massive returns. Period.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will be issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.

I think it depends on how many issues there actually are. One of the problems with the internet is that it can allow a minor problem to get blown way out of proportion, especially with a technology release which early on will sell to tech savvy people who are big internet users.

It comes down to percentages. If say it's 0.1% of the devices that sold that have this wifi problem, then Solipsism is right, realistically there are going to be problems due to the impossibility of testing each individual component.

If it's say 5% of devices with the issue, Greg is right, Apple didn't test enough and were obviously content to let users find their bugs.

When all is said and done however, it all comes down to cost. I'm sure Apple would love a 0% return rate on the warranty, but that probably would mean testing all components individually, and costs would go through the roof. There is a happy medium to be struck.
post #52 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by greg30127 View Post

I suppose I'll spell it out for you...

I don't suggest they open every box. I'm saying if there is a design flaw in this device that causes it to not work as well as it could/should, then the device functionality/design should have been tested before it was produced, boxed, and shipped to stores, smart-ass.

1) Actually, I'm the one that spelling it out for you. As I clearly pointed out there is no way that they can test every single shipping product without using the steps I mentioned, which is the only way to ensure that there will no CE issues. (in fact, every that isn't completely accurate as some issues don't occur right away).

2) How do you know it's a design flaw and where was it suggested that a few people experiencing WiFi issues makes it a design flaw?

3) A design flaw is one of the reasons they do testing. These are usually vetted early on because, well, it's part of the design that is flawed.

4) Your "should have been tested" comment is now claiming that any CE with issues is proof that they didn't do any testing is now beyond asinine. Of course they test the hell out of these products but that doesn't mean there won't be some with issues. Unrealistic expectations!
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post #53 of 151
I really, really appreciate all of you with the inside info on Apple R&D and product testing.

It would be foolish to just "assume" that Apple does not test product before launch. Thank you so much for your valuable inside information and input to this thread.

BTW, my 64GB iPad connects flawlessly with my AirPort Extreme base at home and with our ancient Linksys G router here at work. This really surprises me since the iPad was not tested by Apple and according to those expert posters in this thread that my iPad is a piece of junk.

Excuse me while I box my iPad for return. Yeah, right.
post #54 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

I think it depends on how many issues there actually are. One of the problems with the internet is that it can allow a minor problem to get blown way out of proportion, especially with a technology release which early on will sell to tech savvy people who are big internet users.

Some issues can be one of the thousands of components Apple has to buy for the device. Another can be the assembly quality of the factory. Another can be drivers. Yet another can SW. Those are just the big ones.

Quote:
It comes down to percentages. If say it's 0.1% of the devices that sold that have this wifi problem, then Solipsism is right, realistically there are going to be problems due to the impossibility of testing each individual component.

It's more than just percentages. If say, the first iPhone had 0.10% issue rate, but the 3GS had a 0.05% issue rate. Apple had reduced the percentages of issues through tighter controls but the number of units sold makes the total number with issue greater than the original iPhone.

And that is without accounting for the internet acting like a exponentially growing echo chamber of negative press.
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post #55 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yes, it is absolutely asinine and unrealistic to expect that every single component built in every single factory along every single point of the process be tested by Apple before it touches your greasy hands. There is also a possibility of the shipment being jostled so hard that it caused issues so your suggesting that every single Apple product be tested means that Apple should open up every single box right before it touches your hands and test it thoroughly before giving it to you. You honestly can't see how testing every single product is impossible or how there will be issues will all CE at some point somewhere? What we should expect is Apple to continually work to lower the percentage of issues and to continue to offer a great policy if their are any.

Not contradicting you here, but just wanted to comment that Bang & Olufsen actually claims to test each and every unit that leaves their factory (or at least they used to anyway). However, when they charge $5,000 for a CD changer, you have to ask yourself if it's really worth it.
post #56 of 151
can't blame at&t for this one..
post #57 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. .....

Yeah, sure. Apple wouldn't be aware of that.

Or perhaps they are aware, but they are doing this just to torment their buyers, who in turn are so unhappy that they dump the product in droves..... oh wait....

Get real.

Add: Saw that masternav beat me to it..... (but I'll leave mine on anyway).
post #58 of 151
Used mine since Saturday morning, only issue I have had is I had to manually join the network first few times. I have a dead spot in my kitchen which didn't surprise me that I had a weak signal there.

Chances are if it is an issue it is software related since it shares the same communications as the iPhone and the touch (albeit the tablet has N).
post #59 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

Not contradicting you here, but just wanted to comment that Bang & Olufsen actually claims to test each and every unit that leaves their factory (or at least they used to anyway). However, when they charge $5,000 for a CD changer, you have to ask yourself if it's really worth it.

Absolutely. High priced, low volume sales have that benefit but fall out of CE and into the luxury or premium electronics category. There are at least a couple other products I can think of that do thorough testing. Rolls Royce and Boeing come to mind, the former because it's a luxury item and the latter for safety reasons. That does not mean that there still can't be or won't issues at some point, and history shows there are. Even the smallest component that costs a fraction of a penny can have an issue that could affect the device after a week of use that won't be seen with an initial test.


Quote:
Originally Posted by stevejr View Post

can't blame at&t for this one..

There is evidence to suggest that the iPhone was causing unneeded strain on AT&T and other carrier's networks and that Apple is working on an update to resolve their end of the issue. Surely it's not the only issue AT&T was experiencing.
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post #60 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

Not contradicting you here, but just wanted to comment that Bang & Olufsen actually claims to test each and every unit that leaves their factory (or at least they used to anyway). However, when they charge $5,000 for a CD changer, you have to ask yourself if it's really worth it.

I think people are missing the point. I believe what is being said is that Apple can't test every iPad with every router/wifi setup out there. There are too many variables. They can't test the iPad you bought, in your house, with your router, etc.

Of course each iPad goes through a QA test before being boxed up. That doesn't mean you won't have a problem with your router because of interference from your cordless phone or something. It is impossible to check every variable.
post #61 of 151
Doesn't sound like a major hardware issue to me, but more likely software. According to iFixit's teardowns, the antenna is the same one in the iMacs. The Broadcom wifi chipset is the same as the one in the 3rd generation iPod touch. So, the components are tried and true. Perhaps, there's a loose wire, but more likely it's a software fix.

The only other thing I'd point out is that N routers needed to be configured carefully. Some have dual band, some don't, etc.
post #62 of 151
If you buy a cuting edge product you are going to get defects like this. What amazes me is the Apple Fanboys who believe Apple is somehow immune to the laws of Product lifecycle/introduction

You mean you expect it to work flawlessly? Interesting - You really are leading a delluded life?

I own Apple stock which I just sold some of at 237, I will buy some back again in a few weeks once the price has dropped to 200's again. I hope to see more and more reports like this one as the early adopters report in so the share price can drop back to a buy back point and once the "reality distortion field" has dissipated some what. btw I have made enough on Apple stock on the last uptick from 193 -> 237 to pay for 5 Ipad's.

Laughing all the way to the Bank, I love Steve Jobs - he is the proverbial hustler/salesman and you folks lap it up hook line and sinker, thank you for making me more money - I love you all
post #63 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooso View Post

I think people are missing the point. I believe what is being said is that Apple can't test every iPad with every router/wifi setup out there. There are too many variables. They can't test the iPad you bought, in your house, with your router, etc.

Of course each iPad goes through a QA test before being boxed up. That doesn't mean you won't have a problem with your router because of interference from your cordless phone or something. It is impossible to check every variable.

Oh, I agree with you completely. I was just trying to comment that testing every single unit before it leaves the factory isn't the best solution either. As is the case with B&O, among other things, the testing adds to making the product prohibitively expensive for most consumers and as Solipsism pointed out, places the device/item into an entirely different product category. But even then, you still have your problems with the Rolls Royces and B&Os of the world.
post #64 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooso View Post

I think people are missing the point. I believe what is being said is that Apple can't test every iPad with every router/wifi setup out there...

Er, did you miss the part where it said including Apple's own routers???
post #65 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondosinatra View Post

Er, did you miss the part where it said including Apple's own routers???

Ok, so Apple presumably tested it with their Airport Extreme base station. That's still not the same as "every router/wifi setup" out there.
post #66 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooso View Post

I think people are missing the point. I believe what is being said is that Apple can't test every iPad with every router/wifi setup out there. There are too many variables. They can't test the iPad you bought, in your house, with your router, etc.

True enough. But there seem to be certain areas in which Apple has more than its share of "problems" over the years. One of those is "wake from sleep" behavior. Another seems to be WiFi. Sure, there are lots of variables, and sometimes Apple's implementation may be more technically correct than, say, someones 2002 LinkSys router. Which is little comfort to the person with 8 other devices connecting flawlessly and an iPad that acts like a fish out of water. Get thy router a firmware update... Fun!

Bottom line is the actual percentage of users having problems. If it is significant, no doubt a software update will arrive quickly. If it's a tiny minority, maybe not. Personally, I re-enable Delayed_Ack on my home Macs every once in a while to see if the niggling conflict with Nagle's Algorithm during file sharing has been fixed. Some day...
post #67 of 151
ha all you new scrubs, that's why you wait a few months. the real testers are the early adopters so next time wait a few weeks before going out and buying a new mac
post #68 of 151
I bought the 16GB iPad and it found my Apple Extreme right away.
post #69 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob55 View Post

Ok, so Apple presumably tested it with their Airport Extreme base station. That's still not the same as "every router/wifi setup" out there.

Apparently you haven't had enough coffee today......they presumably tested it with their Airport Extreme base stations, and yet some people having problems are using those presumably tested routers.
post #70 of 151
I have noticed that in one particular room the signal will go from weak to strong randomly, but so far have not seen an impact on internet performance.

I've also used the device at work (where the wofi signal is terrible in my office) at Pret a Manger and in Starbucks, with no issues.

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Do not overrate what you have received, nor envy others.
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post #71 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by ktappe View Post

Most likely because Apple insists on using aluminum cases for their computers. Think about how silly it is that they keep putting a Faraday cage around their WiFi antennas. Yes, the Macs/iPads look good, but form should follow function, Mr. Ive.

hurry up and submit your resume to apple, i'm sure they'll consider your clever ideas, and will change all of their products
post #72 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul94544 View Post

If you buy a cuting edge product you are going to get defects like this. What amazes me is the Apple Fanboys who believe Apple is somehow immune to the laws of Product lifecycle/introduction

You mean you expect it to work flawlessly? Interesting - You really are leading a delluded life?

I own Apple stock which I just sold some of at 237, I will buy some back again in a few weeks once the price has dropped to 200's again. I hope to see more and more reports like this one as the early adopters report in so the share price can drop back to a buy back point and once the "reality distortion field" has dissipated some what. btw I have made enough on Apple stock on the last uptick from 193 -> 237 to pay for 5 Ipad's.

Laughing all the way to the Bank, I love Steve Jobs - he is the proverbial hustler/salesman and you folks lap it up hook line and sinker, thank you for making me more money - I love you all

your comment is very interesting! don't get run over by a car on your way to the bank

did you buy an ipad and get any wifi issues?
post #73 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooso View Post

I think people are missing the point. I believe what is being said is that Apple can't test every iPad with every router/wifi setup out there. There are too many variables. They can't test the iPad you bought, in your house, with your router, etc.

Of course each iPad goes through a QA test before being boxed up. That doesn't mean you won't have a problem with your router because of interference from your cordless phone or something. It is impossible to check every variable.

Spot on. I live in a renovated but still structurally old (100 years or so) Finnish apartment building. The walls are so thick and the apartment so large that I had to double my wifi capacity to get coverage in the back part of my apartment. I have one Time Capsule extending to an Airport Extreme all running N (TC is dual band with one band on G for iPhone and other non-N stuff), and two Airport Expresses but set on N. My Macs can now just grab any network it chooses and I have not problems streaming or with connectivity issues.
post #74 of 151
No problems. Mine showed up Saturday morning with 97% charge. First thing I did was set the wifi to my local home network on an Apple Extreme N. I locked on instantly. Played with it all day Saturday and much of Sunday. Rock solid all over my house.

Only issue that it requires the charger to charge the battery - connection through my unpowered hub on my iMac isn't providing enough juice. Might get a powered USB hub to solve that issue.

All I really need is an iChat client. The AIM iPad app isn't exactly what I expect.

It is a fantastic device. I'm thrilled.
post #75 of 151
Sheesh! Reading some of the comments here! As far as I'm concerned it's a minor miracle that any of these things work at all. Push the button and there you go, Star Trek at your fingertips. When you consider the incredible complexity of these devices that we regard so casually. Hundreds, even thousands of tiny components, all with minimal margins of tolerance, all having to work perfectly together, all the time. Then there is the software, where a few lines of badly written code amongst millions can cause some completely unforeseeable problem to arise weeks later. The companies doing this stuff are working in the outer reaches of what is technologically possible, pioneers really, slowly pushing the boundaries of what is possible further forward by their efforts. To expect a 0% glitch rate is completely unrealistic out here on the frontier, and it seems to me that Apple has a pretty good record in this regard, with a low failure rate and generally speaking a reasonable approach to making amends when they do. I don't think it is realistic to expect more than that.

Think about the effort, cost and sheer brain power it takes to get a Shuttle into orbit. Every component relentlessly tested, every foreseeable scenario factored in, yet it was a simple rubber sealant ring that caused the Challenger to fail so tragically. Some progress can only be achieved on the back of learnt mistakes, that's just how it is.
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Believe nothing, no matter where you heard it, not even if I have said it, if it does not agree with your own reason and your own common sense.
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post #76 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Was trying to play pocket legends on my iPad the other day and was getting this problem. Ping was fluctuating between 200 and 9000 wildly. Thought it was the server but the other players in my game didn't have any problems.

Hasn't Apple always had trouble with their airport? I hope this is something they can fix via software update but their Airport track record makes me think Rev 2.

With my MacBook Pro if I don't use it for a while, sometimes I will have to turn off Airport and turn it back on in order for it to work.

Another strange bug I've seen is I have some high end FireWire audio devivces. If I use a KVR switch and switch to micrsoft vista, it works fine ( for my PC only audio software or plug
ins, I have to log out of osx and wait a few minutes, then log back in. Sometimes it doesn't work and I have to reboot. I would have thought it would have been the other way around, but no, Vista and Win 7 always work. OSX always needs to have the user log off or reboot. Strange.

I'm not getting mine until at least a few months or maybe more as you know rev 2 will have more. Maybe.
post #77 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by pondosinatra View Post

Apparently you haven't had enough coffee today......they presumably tested it with their Airport Extreme base stations, and yet some people having problems are using those presumably tested routers.

Are you kidding, I haven't had any coffee in weeks. But seriously, I've got a friend who has an iPad and an Airport Extreme base station and his setup works fine. There's just to little info so far to make any determinations. Perhaps the reality distortion field is having and effect on the WiFi signals in those instances.
post #78 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I'm sure it exists. WiFi issues exist with all products. From this limited information it sounds like a driver or OS issue, not HW. I'd curious about the 3G version with the plastic stripe. I stated last week that I would expect a little better WiFI with that model.

Damn, beaten to it. I was about to say something similar, thinking that the all-aluminum iPad would have worse signal reception than the 3G iPad with that plastic strip.
post #79 of 151
It appears that not all of the people are having the problem but enough are to lead one to suspect that some of the iPads could have problems with their Wi-Fi units. Does any one have any knowledge whether the iPad's Wi-Fi unit and components were all from the same supplier/manufacturer? If there are different suppliers, then Apple needs to determine which of the supplier's units that are causing the problem. We know that Apple's screen manufacturer had problems delivering the quota that Apple needed to get the iPad out on schedule. If there was only one manufacturer using the same components then there could be something in the way it was put together.

Also curious whether the problems are with only with the 16 or 32 or 63 GB models or is random across the spectrum? To be sure those having problems should be talking to Apple and let us know what's up.
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無心 The idea of wilderness needs no defense, it only needs defenders., Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit__Edward Abbey
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post #80 of 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

We know that Apple's screen manufacturer had problems delivering the quota that Apple needed to get the iPad out on schedule.

I wasn't aware that this was ever confirmed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Also curious whether the problems are with only with the 16 or 32 or 63 GB models or is random across the spectrum? To be sure those having problems should be talking to Apple and let us know what's up.

Cool, a 63 GB model. JK
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