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Christians

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
I just dont like 'em!

post #2 of 38
yes'm
"If it weren't for my horse...I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

"If curling is an olympic sport, then oral sex is adultery. If anything, oral sex should be an olympic sport...cause it's...
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"If it weren't for my horse...I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

"If curling is an olympic sport, then oral sex is adultery. If anything, oral sex should be an olympic sport...cause it's...
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post #3 of 38
Hey! Rank on the Mormons, that is more fun... <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />

Just kidding. Being a Christian I would like to know what your definition of Christian is? After all, Mormons are "Christians", Good People consider themselves Christians. It is heavily over-used and is almost a meaningless term the way you are using it. It is like saying. People, don't like em.
NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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post #4 of 38
Saying "I dont like christians" is a little broad dont you think?
Lets specify:
I dont like the Catholic church.
Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
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Those who dance the dance must look very foolish to those who can't hear the music
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post #5 of 38
post #6 of 38
These few words will be the only ones I waste on this thread, it's so pathetic and flame-hungry.
Living life in glorious 4G HD (with a 2GB data cap).
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Living life in glorious 4G HD (with a 2GB data cap).
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post #7 of 38
Thread Starter 
Call me blind, but I just can't picture some virgin giving birth to a guy who is supposed to somehow "save" us if we just believe in Him.



::zips up fire-retardant trousers::

[ 03-11-2002: Message edited by: starfleetX ]</p>
post #8 of 38
Thread Starter 
And perhaps I should slightly narrow my view to:

Pushy Christians who must "save" you.
I just don't like 'em!
post #9 of 38
Thread Starter 
Bigot
post #10 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by starfleetX:
<strong>Call me blind, but I just can't picture some virgin giving birth to a guy who is supposed to somehow "save" us if we just believe in Him.



::zips up fire-retardant trousers::

[ 03-11-2002: Message edited by: starfleetX ]</strong><hr></blockquote>

not so much blind, but dense. yer the type who has to see something to believe it, no? and if something is a bit different than the norm, u throw a fit? cause its not "normal." open up yer eyes dude. try something different. try listening. why is a savior so hard to believe in???

tell me oh intelligent one, what do u believe in?
"If it weren't for my horse...I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

"If curling is an olympic sport, then oral sex is adultery. If anything, oral sex should be an olympic sport...cause it's...
Reply
"If it weren't for my horse...I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

"If curling is an olympic sport, then oral sex is adultery. If anything, oral sex should be an olympic sport...cause it's...
Reply
post #11 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by starfleetX:
<strong>And perhaps I should slightly narrow my view to:

Pushy Christians who must "save" you.
I just don't like 'em!</strong><hr></blockquote>

Okay, I lied in my earlier post. I don't like "pushy" Christians either. Remember, though, that the whole "Jesus Christ is your savior" thing is *kind of* a major part of Christianity.

Kind of like coffee to Starbucks. If you separate the two, well...
Living life in glorious 4G HD (with a 2GB data cap).
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Living life in glorious 4G HD (with a 2GB data cap).
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post #12 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by CosmoNut:
<strong>

Okay, I lied in my earlier post. I don't like "pushy" Christians either. Remember, though, that the whole "Jesus Christ is your savior" thing is *kind of* a major part of Christianity.

Kind of like coffee to Starbucks. If you separate the two, well...</strong><hr></blockquote>

i hear they serve smoothies there too.
"If it weren't for my horse...I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

"If curling is an olympic sport, then oral sex is adultery. If anything, oral sex should be an olympic sport...cause it's...
Reply
"If it weren't for my horse...I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

"If curling is an olympic sport, then oral sex is adultery. If anything, oral sex should be an olympic sport...cause it's...
Reply
post #13 of 38
I think i am going to begin a new thread : life : i don't like it. <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" /> <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
post #14 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by NoahJ:
<strong>Good People consider themselves Christians.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Heh? Explain why only Christians can be the "Good People" here on Earth... <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" />
I AM THE Royal Pain in the Ass.
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I AM THE Royal Pain in the Ass.
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post #15 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by Artman @_@:
<strong>

Heh? Explain why only Christians can be the "Good People" here on Earth... <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" /> </strong><hr></blockquote>

Read the entire post Artman @_@.

[quote]After all, Mormons are "Christians", Good People consider themselves Christians. It is heavily over-used and is almost a meaningless term the way you are using it.<hr></blockquote>

My point was that just becasue you are a good person and such does NOT necesarily mean you are a Christian. Also on the flip side, I have met some people that seem to meet all the requirements to be a Christian and are the snobbiest (is that a word ) worst people who feel that they can act however they want because they are forgiven. It goes both ways and only God knows for sure.

And to more specifically answer your post, I know many really good people who are not Christians. God knows where they are and I can only tell them what I believe. They have to make their own choices.
NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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post #16 of 38
Ah, the ever common "I'm open-minded because I'm non-religious." stance. If that's what this is all about, try harder.

I've seen too many people, namely intellectual-aristocrats, who think that being anti-religious means being open minded and trendy. That is why I make the hypothesis here.
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post #17 of 38
Where are those mods? Isnt it their job to lock flame-bait threads like these?
I'm not living... I'm just killing time.
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I'm not living... I'm just killing time.
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post #18 of 38
I dislike Christianity (and all other religions with the possible exception of Zen Buddhism) because all of them, no matter how well intentioned allow people to shift blame off of themselves. As soon as you let someone tell you what is right and wrong instead of discovering it for yourself you have given up what is, perhaps, the most important freedom that any one can have, and I absolutely will not accept any organization that claims that power.

As far as Christians, I refuse to make any statements. I know plenty of Christians that I do like and plenty that I don't. The same goes for Jews, Buddhists, Muslem's, and even a few Hare Krishna.
"America is a society where intellect seems to be out of style, replaced by garish gold jewelry, and winter clothes worn year round."
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"America is a society where intellect seems to be out of style, replaced by garish gold jewelry, and winter clothes worn year round."
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post #19 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by RyanTheGreat:
<strong>Where are those mods? Isnt it their job to lock flame-bait threads like these?</strong><hr></blockquote>
I've been watching the various threads on religion very closely, and for the most part they've contained reasoned discussion, albeit extremely opinionated.

I don't believe the content of this thread violates any part of the ToS, posts seem reasonable and contain no personal abuse. I haven't received any complaints.

Perhaps the other mods will feel differently.
Chicanery.
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Chicanery.
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post #20 of 38
I was raised Christian, but the more I found out about it's history, the less it appealed to me, considering the countless millions who have been killed in its name, the centuries-old practise of instilling fear, guilt, ignorance and self-loathing by default in the minds of people; the immense riches, self-importance and elitism of organizations that pretend to be the purveyors of the philosophy and teachings of one humble and wildly misunderstood man from the middle east.

I am not having a go at just Christians. All the big religions are complicit in similar folly, most especially the orthodox and fundamentalist versions which are the ones most heavily reliant on rigidity, superstition and ignorance, no matter which faith or denomination.

When these intensely personal matters are compromised to suit the masses, and big organizations take the helm, that is when the teachings become distorted, and the BS takes over.
If you believe in God, whatever that means, and want to communicate with said diety, then is not the best way to accomplish this in silence by oneself in solitary meditation, contemplation or prayer? This can be done by any human being, at any time; it is built in by default, and is his/her business and nobody else's. All the excess baggage (religious organizations) isn't going to get you any closer to God, or make you a better human being. If you feel the need to communicate with God, (whatever that may mean, I don't know) then cut out the middle man...he is after your money, allegiance and adherence first and foremost.

Perhaps the best thing that comes out of religion is the sense of community and social events that revolve around churches, synagogues, mosques, temples etc. But regarding the connection/ correllation between religion and morality, I know many well-meaning people who are Christians and Jews. I know far fewer Muslims, Hindus or Buddhists (mainly because of where I live), but I can be sure that the proportions of well-meaning to malevolent people are constant no matter what stand they hang their spiritual hats on. And....some of the most moral and well intentioned and benevolent people I have ever met happen to be atheist or agnostic.

As a slightly side-topic addition, thank God (?????!!!! ouch) that America has (so far) managed to exist without an official government sanctioned faith, and public institutions remain secular. One can only guess, but I believe we have dodged the bullet of religious strife by maintaining the separation of "church and state".

Also, the "prayer in public schools" issue always irritates me. The Constitution guarantees "freedom of religious expression". This means, by default, freedom from religion; that is a no-brainer. Sadly, it is mostly people who "profess" to be Christian who are at the leading end of subverting this part of the Constitution, and in my view for the worse.

If any Christian wishes to pray in the method recommended/taught by Jesus, then they are free to do so without infringing on anyone else's religious/spiritual leanings, i.e. in silent prayer or meditation, in their *own* time. Jesus Christ himself severely chastises those who have to indulge in the public display of piousness (Matthew 6: 5-10, which is the opposite of the methods employed by much of standard American Christianity). Why go for compromise when the DIY method is so much more effective and natural?
Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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post #21 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by Samantha Joanne Ollendale:
<strong>As a slightly side-topic addition, thank God (?????!!!! ouch) that America has (so far) managed to exist without an official government sanctioned faith, and public institutions remain secular. One can only guess, but I believe we have dodged the bullet of religious strife by maintaining the separation of "church and state".</strong><hr></blockquote>
Well, other than perhaps the constant references to "God" by our president and numerous politicians. And swearing on a bible in court. Oh, and the Pledge of Allegiance.
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Chicanery.
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post #22 of 38
[quote]Well, other than perhaps the constant references to "God" by our president and numerous politicians.<hr></blockquote>

!

[quote]And swearing on a bible in court. Oh, and the Pledge of Allegiance.<hr></blockquote>

Oooops! I also forgot the insistence of some judges to post plaques bearing the 10 Commandments in their courtrooms, (Texas comes to mind, again). I wonder how many times the 6th Commandment has been trashed in those courtrooms by imposing death sentences?

[ 03-11-2002: Message edited by: Samantha Joanne Ollendale ]</p>
Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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Why of course the people don't want war ... But after all it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a...
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post #23 of 38
You forget the money part belle. God is on our money.

If native americans got away with not being Christians, I can get away with not being a Christian.

Even though I've been baptized. Pray/meditate in the Samantha Jones style every now and then. Still, I don't go to church. I don't feel the need. And my praying isn't to "the lord".

And what's up with that Pat Roberts club? Those guys give Christians a bad name. They even have that one middle eastern guy on there who claims to be healing people - but has been documented and proven to do nothing but take people's money while giving nothing in return.

I don't think there is a little man in the clouds. I probably won't ever face a 'judgement day'. However, I hope I will have lived a good life by the time I die. If that isn't good enough then so be it. There must have been many Christians in the days of slavery who went to hell, no?

And I still don't understand how war gives people an 'out' to the thou shall not kill commandment.

Not enough direct answers in the bible for me to go around telling people they should subscribe to Christianity - and when I was younger I actually wanted to be a preacher for a while. But the more I learned, the more superstitious it seemed - although I'm pretty sure some of it is based on fact/reality. Considering the Bible has been translated numerous times, to fit different agendas, over the ages I think it's a decent religion. Just not something to fret too much about.

So long as a person follows the golden rule I think they'll be ok.
post #24 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by seb:
<strong>You forget the money part belle. God is on our money. </strong><hr></blockquote>
That's just how scary this gets... I paid for my sandwiches just moments before posting above and it didn't even occur to me.
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Chicanery.
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post #25 of 38
Most references to God by the US goverment were developed in the 50's as part of anti-communist agenda.

Moving on, I noticed that nonhuman mentioned Buddhism. If you take the time to study it, which perhaps you have, you might notice that it shares an awful lot with Christianity. It almost seems to me that Jesus could be considered enlightened, perhaps even the enlightened one. Of course, I'm familiar with Indian Buddhism and not Zen, but I'd image the two are similar.

Beyond that I don't quite grasp your "blame-shifting" argument. In Christianity one can be forgiven, but that doesn't mean that there will be no consequences.
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post #26 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by Splinemodel:
<strong>Moving on, I noticed that nonhuman mentioned Buddhism. If you take the time to study it, which perhaps you have, you might notice that it shares an awful lot with Christianity. It almost seems to me that Jesus could be considered enlightened, perhaps even the enlightened one. Of course, I'm familiar with Indian Buddhism and not Zen, but I'd image the two are similar.</strong><hr></blockquote>

The most appealing thing to me about Zen Buddhism is that it stresses individuality and self-determination / -discovery.

[quote]<strong>Beyond that I don't quite grasp your "blame-shifting" argument. In Christianity one can be forgiven, but that doesn't mean that there will be no consequences.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Blame-shifting isn't really what I meant, I was originally going to say something different, but changed my mind and I forgot to change that one line. My point was just that I won't support any organization that claims to have the authority to dictate one's morality. Also that anyone who would give up that right, I don't think can be trusted with the responsibility of leadership of any sort, and certainly should not be allowed into a position of leadership.
"America is a society where intellect seems to be out of style, replaced by garish gold jewelry, and winter clothes worn year round."
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"America is a society where intellect seems to be out of style, replaced by garish gold jewelry, and winter clothes worn year round."
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post #27 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by nonhuman:
<strong>

Blame-shifting isn't really what I meant, I was originally going to say something different, but changed my mind and I forgot to change that one line. My point was just that I won't support any organization that claims to have the authority to dictate one's morality. Also that anyone who would give up that right, I don't think can be trusted with the responsibility of leadership of any sort, and certainly should not be allowed into a position of leadership.</strong><hr></blockquote>

This is fairly interesting, and I think it's not the pursuit of Buddhism, but aside from that it's purely illogical. If my measure of morality makes it acceptable for me to rob a bank or kill people, then is that OK? The Ten Commandments of Christianity do indeed provide a set of guidelines with which to gauge morals, but aside from the ones directly related to God, there's not too much to gripe about unless you're a thief, murderer, etc. The Buddhist ascension is not set in stone, but it is generally fairly objective, and in order to be enlightened one has to realize that it's not of benefit to burden the lives of others or to be untruthful. So even Buddhism has a fairly objective set of rules, they are just not presented in a canonical form, probably since Buddhism itself isn't really a religion.

As for leadership, I don't know where you live, but in America the court exists primarily to straighten out cases of untruthfulness. Since we're not all perfect it is a necessary institution and it should exist in some form or another. Aside from that straightforward criminal activity, I'm free to do whatever I'd like. As for the Institution of the Church, I don't think they do anything to punish criminals these days. I don't think they dicate anyone's morality either. The only places I know of where institutions dicate morality are places with socialist and/or fascist governments.

Lastly, we don't wear gold chains and winter clothes all year round. Where are you from? You strike me as British.

[ 03-11-2002: Message edited by: Splinemodel ]</p>
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post #28 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by nonhuman:
<strong>

Blame-shifting isn't really what I meant, I was originally going to say something different, but changed my mind and I forgot to change that one line. My point was just that I won't support any organization that claims to have the authority to dictate one's morality. Also that anyone who would give up that right, I don't think can be trusted with the responsibility of leadership of any sort, and certainly should not be allowed into a position of leadership.</strong><hr></blockquote>

I don't mean to pile on, but this is a real sticking point with me. The fact is, the Church does not (or should not) dictate anyone's morality. One of the obligations a Christian has is to be constantly plotting on your own the proper moral path through every situation you encounter in life - true morality is developed from within, not imposed from without.

To correct Splinemodel (above) the Ten Commandments are not Christian. They are Jewish. Christians have only Two Commandments: (1) To love God with all your heart, soul, and mind, and (2) To love your neighbor as yourself. Those are the two principles by which we are to live our lives: evaluating every thought and action based on what will show love for God and/or love of others. We sin when we make bad judgements with respect to those commandments. To paraphrase Jesus, "All of the Law is embodied in those two principles."

Now, the problem is that for nearly all of us, living by those two rules and constantly evaluating everything we do is hard. We don't like to do it. So many Christians (and Christian denominations) have taken the "easy" way out and resorted to Legalism by trying to work out all the "right moves" in advance. Long lists of "dos" and "don'ts" appear, so that we don't have to actually ponder the meaning of our actions. The unfortunate result is a complete negation of Jesus' message - that He came to free us from the Law completely - not just replace the old Jewish Law with a new Christian Law (and I'm not dissing Judaism here - the Torah is indeed sacred; it's just not Christian). God would write the Law on our hearts instead (via those two commandments above) so we could remain flexible through life and constantly live to help others.

So, I agree with many of the others above. As a Christian, I am also pained by the legalistic, "Holier than Thou" Christians. They do not represent the real ideals of Christianity, and it saddens me to see that so many nonChristians are using them as models for all Christians.
"Mathematics is the language with which God has written the Universe" - Galileo Galilei
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"Mathematics is the language with which God has written the Universe" - Galileo Galilei
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post #29 of 38
Thanks for the backup there. I was more or less trying to say that, though I'm wasn't quite sure how to phrase it, or how to present it without exposing the fact that I don't know enough about the subject.
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post #30 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by TJM:
<strong>To correct Splinemodel (above) the Ten Commandments are not Christian. They are Jewish. Christians have only Two Commandments: (1) To love God with all your heart, soul, and mind, and (2) To love your neighbor as yourself. Those are the two principles by which we are to live our lives: evaluating every thought and action based on what will show love for God and/or love of others. We sin when we make bad judgements with respect to those commandments. To paraphrase Jesus, "All of the Law is embodied in those two principles."</strong><hr></blockquote>

While technically true (and correct me if I've misinterpreted), the connotation that you seem to be making is that the 10 commandments do not apply to Christians. It is true that Christians are no longer under the law (in a certain sense), but that does not in any way mean that they may disregard it. Morality is still absolute, but the point made both in the Gospels and the Pauline writings is that with the presence of the Spirit the Law is an anachronism, as the Law lives within the believer. It is not up to the believer to decide right and wrong for himself, but for him to remain sensitive to the Spirit so that the Law flows from within as a natural obedience to God, instead of from without. Jesus did not say that there were only two commandments, but simply that those two were the greatest commandments, and from these all others were derived. That by no means frees us from the commandments of the Law.

The freedom from the Law mentioned in Paul's writings was not a freedom from its dictates, but freedom from its judgements. Jesus Himself made it clear that the law is firm, and that the unrighteous will be judged by the law. Christians who have accepted the atonement are free from the judgement of the Law, but are not free to ignore it in favor of their own morality.

Perhaps I have misunderstood your meaning?
post #31 of 38
I'm pretty sure the commandment about the sabbath does not apply to Christians.
post #32 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by Outsider:
<strong>I'm pretty sure the commandment about the sabbath does not apply to Christians.</strong><hr></blockquote>

In the strictest sense of resting on Saturday only, I suppose not. But there is no reason to reject the point of the commandment which is to work for six days and rest on the seventh. Most Christians have shifted it to Sunday due to early expulsion from the Jewish sabbath services, but the commandment to set aside a day as holy still holds. Jesus challenged the overzealous and hypocritical religious leaders of the time who would see a man die rather than help him on the sabbath (ignoring the spirit of the Law and resting completely on its word), but neither Christ nor Paul advocated the abolition of the sabbath remembrance.

[ 03-13-2002: Message edited by: Fluffy ]</p>
post #33 of 38
Wow! Good stuff being posted here by Fluffy and Splinemodel.

Fluffy, I agree (maybe even with your whole argument, Is that a first? ) As you mentioned, Jesus said that he did not come to abolish the law, and that not even one pen stroke of it would dissapear before teh Judgement day. As you asserted we are not under the law, but we should still do our best to abide by it. I really can't think of much to add right now without going line by line so I will just read the posts again and see if anything stands out.
NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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post #34 of 38
[quote]Originally posted by NoahJ:
<strong>Fluffy, I agree (maybe even with your whole argument, Is that a first? )</strong><hr></blockquote>

post #35 of 38
As a Christian, I don't have to abide by the 10 Commandments? That's news to me. :confused: <img src="graemlins/bugeye.gif" border="0" alt="[Skeptical]" /> <img src="graemlins/embarrassed.gif" border="0" alt="[Embarrassed]" />
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post #36 of 38
I think I oversimplified. What I wrote made sense to me because I filled in a lot of gaps mentally, but I can see it isn't terribly accurate as written. My apologies.

My point is that if we follow those two commandments, we will naturally follow the others. The Law is really about righteous living and how to do it. By Jesus' day, the Mosaic Law had become so voluminous and onerous it was not a blessing but a curse for many. The Pharisees and others used their intimate knowledge of the Law to set themselves up as superior to others who didn't know the minute details, or simply couldn't keep them for practical reasons. So rather than being a tool to bring us closer to God, it had become a weapon one class of people was using against another.

Jesus' point was that He wanted us to go beyond the letter of the Law to the spirit behind it. In other words, I don't keep a Sabbath because the Ten Commandments tells me to - I do so because that is a way to show my love for God. I do not kill, or steal, or dishonor my parents because that would not be showing love for my neighbor. I am not judged by breaking the Law - I am judged by not loving God or neighbors.

Any set of instructions for righteous living is going to be inherently limited. New situations are always cropping up that no one has thought of before. The Sabbath is a prime example. Christians chose to celebrate Resurrection Day (Sunday) which gradually became their Sabbath, although the Law says it is sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. We are still within the spirit of the Law by setting aside a day for rest, family, and prayer, although we are breaking the letter of the Law. Jesus himself broke the Law by healing on the Sabbath. It was one of the charges brought against him at His trial. His point was that the Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. There was a higher good attainable by going beyond the strict dictates of the Law.

That is where we must wrestle with our own morality - where is the greater good? There is a certain amount of moral relativism built into Christianity, like it or not - Jesus' healing on the Sabbath being a prime example. I cannot judge whether your actions are sinful or not. That is God's job, not mine. Whether something you do is sinful is entirely between you and God. What's right for me may not be right for you. My job is to simply love you, no matter what, and try to follow God's will in my life to the best of my ability.
"Mathematics is the language with which God has written the Universe" - Galileo Galilei
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"Mathematics is the language with which God has written the Universe" - Galileo Galilei
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post #37 of 38
Gotcha! I've seen quite a few Christians who have taken "freedom from the Law" to be a license to sin. Hence my request for clarification.
post #38 of 38
Have I just hit an alternate AI? Where am I? Why am I here?
NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
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