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Kraft Foods adds new support for employees choosing Macs - Page 2

post #41 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

I think the IT people couldn't be much happier.

Ha, ha, so naive!

IT department HATE the Mac . If whole company go mac they will have nothing else to do and LOSE THEIR JOB!

IT department loves babysitting retarded computers that do not even run by themselves, let alone doing anything useful.
post #42 of 86
First AT&T and now Kraft???

Does anyone have even a smidgen of respect left for the Mac addict?
post #43 of 86
I dont understand, But not having a Lock down approach you are bound to get some Virus, Rootkit, Trojan in your computer stealing company information.

And this is very dangerous.

Ofcoz, having the security guild lines is good. But what happen if those are being followed?
post #44 of 86
I'm sure companies that companies buying WinPCs every 2-3 years must get big tax breaks, and you can write-off all that hardware through depreciation, etc.

Are there tax benefits/penalties for the employer/employee with this arrangement?

(Asking as I don't live in the USA)
post #45 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cubert View Post

I wonder why the requirement for Snow Leopard and not just Leopard.

It can't be THAT much different for their IT department to support.

I imagine that it's probably to reduce the number of software variations they have to support. Variations in hardware generally don't matter at all as long as it meets the minimum requirements.

Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

I'm sure you haven't had any issues. Your probably pretty computer savvy. I can see that for a small company. Things get more difficult as organizations grow larger. 10-15 different computer setups is no big deal. When you start talking about 1000's things get more difficult. People end up having different versions of software. This makes it incredibly difficult to patch for security and bug fixes. People start buying rogue software that works for themselves but not for the company as a whole. People end up splintering off and you end up with 15 solutions for a simple problem. People purchase software and leave with noone else knowing what tools they've been using because they are non-standard. I'm a big fan of individualized access, but company wide, wow.

The article doesn't link to any further detail, but the article only mentions hardware and MS Office other than that, you might be required to use company software.

Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

so buy your own but we will tell you what you can buy. go F off. i am not fooled. another ploy to get you to pay for the privilege to work for you.

In many cases, it is probably a computer that the employee already owns. A Mac that qualifies is going to be almost any but the oldest Intel Macs, starting about mid-2006. My MBP is 3 years old and qualifies, save for a $30 OS upgrade I haven't needed yet.

I'm not totally unfamiliar with the employee having to have their own tools, I understand that it's par for the course for auto & large truck mechanics. But here, it's just an option, you can just continue using company provided hardware.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

I actually have some experience with KraftCo from my days at IBM. Then they were a very forward-looking company pursuing the latest technology (CICS and DL/I at that time).

What am curious about is: Will they allow the iPad? My best guess is YES!

Not listed as a qualified computer (yet). It may need specific apps, the article specifically mentiones MS Office.
post #46 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masteric View Post

Why Windows 7 Ultimate? Professional should be just fine. The only things Ultimate offers over professional is a language pack and BitLocker. They want the encryption part I guess? That is the only thing I can think of.


Apparently so, per the article, emphasis mine:

Quote:
Participating employees must comply with company policies regarding software, security and data requirements, which includes installing Microsoft Office and appropriate anti-virus software and turning on disk encryption.
post #47 of 86
Considering im an IT tech by trade i have 2 thoughts on this.

I think its cool that they let people use macs

I also think its a horrible idea to let people bring in their own. This will be an IT nightmare.
post #48 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by iax View Post

Ha, ha, so naive!

IT department HATE the Mac . If whole company go mac they will have nothing else to do and LOSE THEIR JOB!

IT department loves babysitting retarded computers that do not even run by themselves, let alone doing anything useful.

I don't know what IT attitudes on Macs really are on the whole, but that impression seems to be a bit of a myth. I've known IT workers that hate Microsoft but still weren't Mac users, one in particular recounted a litany of Exchange problems, or dealing with MS support that simply suggest reinstalling. Yes, it's technically work, but I don't think the whole profession is choosing to go the "make work" route, because it's NOT easy work, it can be very frustrating, especially if something that seems completely unrelated to the problem at hand is causing the problem.

Macs do need some maintenance, and sometimes things go wrong. It's less work, but hardly no work. And it too can be frustrating at times.
post #49 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgc0202 View Post

Technically, what you stated is correct to avoid discrimination. The program though was initiated to accommodate Mac users in a Wintel-based environment. Mac users were the ones who lobbied to have this option adopted.



One possible reason. There is a subsidy if you opt for this program. You have to buy more recent Mac Intel-based computers (if you do not have one yet). You are not be able to use your older Mac computers and pocket the subsidy provided. Just as important, using one OS, Snow Leopard, will minimize versions of softwares maintained in central servers.

If an employee opts for the program, the subsidy usually includes that the employee takes care of the cost of technical support -- not use internal IT services and personnel.




There is a reason why companies have structured the program to include the cost for technical support in the subsidy provided.

The option to provide your own computer will work mainly for those employees who are tech-savvy enough to be able to deal with the usual day-to-day technical issues encountered, and have the foresight to buy an Apple Care, if practical, to deal with for more critical and difficult issues.

It is one thing to seek the support of internal IT in case of emergency. I doubt very much that the company will allow a clueless employee to participate in the program in the future. The company may even impose immediate cessation to participate in the program, if the employee turns up to the "technically-impaired" or clueless.




This is where the more widespread adoption of the iPhone and potentially the iPad, as well as the Apple Store (and perhaps Best Buy "Apple Store") may help in more companies becoming more receptive to Mac computers.

Moreover, unlike in the past, Apple is now paying more attention to the needs of the enterprise, and there are companies, providing solution, e.g., the Citrix ecosystem model, that will allow Apple mobile computing devices to integrate with enterprise servers.

I found out also that Apple Stores now have "business liaisons" to assist people asking for business solutions. However, the one I talked to in the Boylston Apple Store in Boston, while very cooperative. has very limited expertise in biomedical applications though.

Apple should provide more support to local small businesses that offer Apple-centric solutions to address the needs of specific businesses and fields.

CGC

Well stated. I agree with you in principle.
post #50 of 86
never mind...I didn't read all of the posts before posting.
post #51 of 86
.

Another Memo circulating in the Kingdom about 1,000 years ago

.

"To all of you Bean Counters who now wish to use that Hindu-Arabic Base 10 System - OK. But you'll need to do your own calculations and provide your own parchments. The Kingdom will continue to use Roman Numerals for all Official Bean Counting, and you're on your own if you Think Different."

Signed,

The Kingdom's Head Bean Counter

.



.
post #52 of 86
So, am I getting this right? It's okay, only if you provide the Mac? No thanks... In other words, they want to cut IT costs by you providing your own support for you own computer, and they no longer have to provide you with the computer to do your job. So, in essence, you just got more work and a pay cut, because you're providing your own $1000 to $2500 computer. What a bargain! Is Windows really that bad that you would want to do something like this? Not for me...
post #53 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by iax View Post

Ha, ha, so naive!

IT department HATE the Mac . If whole company go mac they will have nothing else to do and LOSE THEIR JOB!

IT department loves babysitting retarded computers that do not even run by themselves, let alone doing anything useful.

I love my Macs and I greatly prefer them to PCs, but I think your comments have nothing to do with reality. My son-in-law is a permanent tech support consultant for a media production company that has a (practically) all Mac environment and he is always busy. (If Macs worked as well as they're reputed to, he wouldn't have a very well-paying job.) There is plenty that goes wrong either with the Macs or with the overall network/server environment. In fact, he got home at 3 am this morning after staying to fix whatever had gone wrong yesterday. One of the biggest problems in the Macs themselves are drive failures. His feeling (and he loves his Macs also) is that the last quality Macs were the G4 "Sawtooth" towers from almost 10 years ago.

And that's aside from the usual support issues, like restoring computers that have crashed, data backup issues, etc.

It's far different using a Mac at home than using a Mac in an office environment and support is definitely still needed.

And while I do hate PCs, they run Word, Excel, Powerpoint, IE 8 (or Safari) and Outlook and that's what probably 90% of all employees need. In addition, most large companies will have some proprietary programs for accounting and finance and those (especially if they're client-server) might not run on the Mac OS at all. And even if they're cloud-based applications, if they're dot.net type apps that use off the shelf tools from companies like Infragistics, they might not work on a Mac even though they're web based. So to say that PCs do nothing useful is immature idiocy.
post #54 of 86
It sure would be cool if my company, and many more, followed Kraft's lead.
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http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

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Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
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post #55 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbonner View Post

Maybe. I worked in a Dell office, and purchased my own Mac. Did my own support, etc, and they agreed to purchase applecare to cover any damage.

Does AppleCare cover damage? It does cover technical support though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post

What a bargain! Is Windows really that bad that you would want to do something like this? Not for me...

I agree with you points but I'd happily take a contribution towards a Mac I get to use at home too and one which will not frustrate the hell out of me like the Dells w/WinXP do at the moment. I only use MS Office and the odd database but these things are unsably slow.

----

Separately I truly hope Kraft doesn't destroy the institution that is Cadbury's. They haven't covered themselves in glory so far... http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/markets...9&in_page_id=3
post #56 of 86
You bring in a computer of your choice which complies with the company's specs. The company even offers you a stipend to help defray the cost of your personal computer.

Obviously, like other Bring Your Own Computer (BYOC) programs which even Microsoft offers its employees, must be able to us 'Desktop Virtualization' to deliver applications and desktops environments to unmanaged devices.

For more info on how it works, perhaps this will http://www.virtualizationpractice.com/blog/?p=3817 will help keep some feet out of some mouths.
post #57 of 86
The article's headline is Newspeak. There will be no "new support" for Macs, it's all about "less support" from IT. This is not a bad thing, it's merely a long-overdue evolution.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZorrowQc View Post

That would certainly keep the IT department busy...

I doubt it. IT support is going to diminish.

Kraft is an enormous company, with enormous IT expenses. It's also a hugely successful company. They haven't grown to be that way without scrutinizing every business decision. They would not initiate a policy like this without serious consideration.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgc0202 View Post

Obviously, this program is a lobby usually initiated by Mac users.

Make no mistake, Kraft is merely succumbing to the inevitable... given a choice, people will choose Apple. There's no stopping the momentum. A less obvious reason is hidden in their policy: if you use a Mac, you're on your own. In other words, IT support is going to gradually diminish since...
Quote:
Originally Posted by cgc0202 View Post

... these Mac users are more technically savvy to know what to do in case something goes awry with their Mac computer.

The policy is driven not by any particular love for Apple, it's driven by the same motivation that drives any corporation: Do more, with less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cgc0202 View Post

To my knowledge, the success stories opting for this program indicated reduced IT services and staff (saving money for the company), increased productivity and satisfaction (I assume from Mac users who opted for the program).

Corporations have been pursuing the productivity goals promised by Microsoft for decades. Perhaps they've finally realized Microsoft's failure to deliver this promise. Whatever productivity improvements made possible by their products has been more than offset by the enormous amount of support required by a Microsoft-centric deployment.

Not many organizations have completely migrated from Microsoft to Apple. Those who have are generally small and have required little initial investment. Those that have never regret the decision. Better late than never.
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post #58 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post

So, am I getting this right? It's okay, only if you provide the Mac? No thanks... In other words, they want to cut IT costs by you providing your own support for you own computer, and they no longer have to provide you with the computer to do your job. So, in essence, you just got more work and a pay cut, because you're providing your own $1000 to $2500 computer. What a bargain! Is Windows really that bad that you would want to do something like this? Not for me...

I see it as an option. Do you not already have your own Mac notebook computer? If you do, the extra marginal expense is likely almost nothing if you choose to use it. And the flier says they will pay for expenses, so it could be to your advantage.

There are other good reasons to not do it though. I would suggest that people not do it, so they can keep their personal and work resources clearly divided, particularly with your data files.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrtotes View Post

Does AppleCare cover damage? It does cover technical support though.

There is no damage protection. It would cover defective parts, and sometimes slightly defective parts expose themselves with heavier use that might not have arisen otherwise.

I'm personally fine with whatever, I've used my own XP computer for my daily work, the Mac stays at home. I don't like some of the Mac's keyboard & mouse controls which require more clicks for tasks that I regularly do, but at least I don't have to worry so much about the core system.
post #59 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

The company outlines minimum system requirements for the program that effectively limit it to PCs running Windows Vista/7 Ultimate (employees can't use the Home, Business, or Professional editions) or any Intel Mac running Snow Leopard with at least a 2GHz processor and 2GB of RAM.

so buy your own but we will tell you what you can buy. go F off. i am not fooled. another ploy to get you to pay for the privilege to work for you. and what IT genius decided win Ultimate but not Pro or business. Someone need media center for work? chess game?

Your comments indicate to the contrary.

A Case in Point: Bring your Own PC Reinvents The Corporate PC: A Citrix Systems Case Study http://simplicityispower.citrix.com/...rporate-pc.pdf

And even a future possibility for the iPad: The iPad As The Door Opener for Bring Your Own Computer " BYOC " http://web2.sys-con.com/node/1274432
post #60 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by majortom1981 View Post

I also think its a horrible idea to let people bring in their own. This will be an IT nightmare.

It is not geared for people sitting in the office at work. It is geared towards those that travel and work from home.
And it won't be an IT nightmare because about the only thing the IT department will have to worry about is getting onto the company network and even then, only from the network side. They will provide the settings you use but it's up to you to configure your own computer to work.
post #61 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

Your comments indicate to the contrary.

A Case in Point: Bring your Own PC Reinvents The Corporate PC: A Citrix Systems Case Study http://simplicityispower.citrix.com/...rporate-pc.pdf

And even a future possibility for the iPad: The iPad As The Door Opener for Bring Your Own Computer " BYOC " http://web2.sys-con.com/node/1274432

Those are great links Onhka. The citrix case study adds more detail to a potential workable implementation. Computers running a thin client firewalled off from the company network makes sense. Company data would reside on the companies servers not on the thin client machines themselves so in theory if there were an issue with the computer another could be issued with minimal data loss. I'm starting to warm up to this. Thanks for the links.
post #62 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by majortom1981 View Post

I also think its a horrible idea to let people bring in their own. This will be an IT nightmare.

Again, I'm already doing this. Those who aren't comfortable configuring their own computers are not likely those who would consider replacing their company-issued machine in the first place.

I bought a Mac Mini for the office. It sits on my desk. It accesses the Exchange server. I run Parallels for those few Windows-only applications I need. I use NeoOffice for 99% of the files I receive from co-workers (for those 1% that aren't properly opened in NeoOffice, I have both Office 2007 and Office 2008; I rarely need either of them). For my own self-created documents, I use iWork.

When I work from home, I use my own MacBook Pro. My company does not provide a VPN client for the Mac, but that's just fine - I prefer to run my VPN inside of a VM, so when I'm remote I am 90% working with Windows XP. I still use iWork for editing a lot of documents, but Parallels supports that fairly seamlessly. One huge advantage of running the VPN inside my VM is that I still have access to the entire Internet outside of the VM, since the Mac isn't pushing bits through the corporate proxy server. It's a fantastic setup, and I love it.

The only time I've ever had to call IT is to reset my password on the proxy server when my password manager got out of sync.

I don't think this is going to be a nightmare for IT. If it does become one, this is probably a pilot program that will ultimately be pulled.
post #63 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by veblen View Post

Those are great links Onhka. The citrix case study adds more detail to a potential workable implementation. Computers running a thin client firewalled off from the company network makes sense. Company data would reside on the companies servers not on the thin client machines themselves so in theory if there were an issue with the computer another could be issued with minimal data loss. I'm starting to warm up to this. Thanks for the links.

Oh, using Citrix adds a whole new (primarily wonderful) dimension. We've been doing this in my office for years as well - not (specifically) for isolating mission critical applications from the outside, but for speed and ease of (centralised) administration.

When the thick client needs to be upgraded, it's done so on the Citrix servers--users don't have to worry about a thing. Our mission critical applications also reside on a production network that is heavily firewalled from the end-user network. For many of our applications, there's a lot of data pushed between client and server. If the thick client resides on the end-user network, that's a lot of traffic going through the firewall (often gigabytes) which degrades the user experience. When the thick client is on the same network as the servers, the data moves very quickly. It's much faster to update the 'display' over the firewall than it is to push gigabytes of data.
post #64 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_CA View Post

It is not geared for people sitting in the office at work. It is geared towards those that travel and work from home.
And it won't be an IT nightmare because about the only thing the IT department will have to worry about is getting onto the company network and even then, only from the network side. They will provide the settings you use but it's up to you to configure your own computer to work.

I think there may be a disconnect here between what companies are doing and what it is perceived that they are doing. I'm guilty of this myself, my initial reaction was, "are they crazy". I've changed my mind. I think you are correct. I would just include one additional item. I don't think it will be necessary for people to perform much configuration on their own computer to do work, if they are using a product like Citrix. The configuration of the applications would be done on the server and the application would be delivered for use on the remote computer. Configuration by the end user would be minimal.

If Kraft is implementing this like Citrix is, people aren't just bringing in their home computers and hooking them up into the companies trusted corporate network. They aren't downloading random software to execute on the trusted corporate network (viruses/spyware/etc).

If they are doing this like Citrix, they are authenticating to vpn software and gaining network access into a firewalled DMZ where the damage they can do if they become compromised is reduced. They aren't installing corporate applications on their computers. The applications are being delivered from a server and are actually executed there. The data for the applications wouldn't reside on the computer they brought from home where it could be lost/stolen/rendered inaccessible. The data would reside on the server where it could be secured/backed up/replicated for access in the event of a disaster. Doing this the citrix way makes sense to me, the non-citrix way sounds like a nightmare from an IT support perspective to me (*it has been debated that if such a deployment were only limited to a group of trusted individuals it could reduce costs and foster innovation* though I agree in principal, I've seen issues with this kind of implementation and I wouldn't recommend it. I like the citrix solution though. I should buy their stock.)
post #65 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames42 View Post

Oh, using Citrix adds a whole new (primarily wonderful) dimension. We've been doing this in my office for years as well - not (specifically) for isolating mission critical applications from the outside, but for speed and ease of (centralised) administration.

When the thick client needs to be upgraded, it's done so on the Citrix servers--users don't have to worry about a thing. Our mission critical applications also reside on a production network that is heavily firewalled from the end-user network. For many of our applications, there's a lot of data pushed between client and server. If the thick client resides on the end-user network, that's a lot of traffic going through the firewall (often gigabytes) which degrades the user experience. When the thick client is on the same network as the servers, the data moves very quickly. It's much faster to update the 'display' over the firewall than it is to push gigabytes of data.

great follow up. love the explanation.
post #66 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

'course if you work for the federal govt., you watch porn on company computers during work hours... and make twice as much as the non-govt. Workers paying your salary!

.

That happens in all offices, not just the Federal government. My wife works in a hospital and porn is all over the place, despite management forbidding it.

If you think government employees makes so much, and have it so good, apply for a job with the government. Do you have the qualifications to apply?
post #67 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames42 View Post


When I work from home, I use my own MacBook Pro. My company does not provide a VPN client for the Mac, but that's just fine - I prefer to run my VPN inside of a VM, so when I'm remote I am 90% working with Windows XP. I still use iWork for editing a lot of documents, but Parallels supports that fairly seamlessly. One huge advantage of running the VPN inside my VM is that I still have access to the entire Internet outside of the VM, since the Mac isn't pushing bits through the corporate proxy server. It's a fantastic setup, and I love it.

https://secure.logmein.com/welcome/a...ess/freedom/3/

Have you looked at the logmein application? My company doesn't provide VPN access from my Mac either. However, I could access my work computer from my home MacBook/iPad and iPhone using logmein. It looks like it creates a tcpip socket connection from my work computer running a vnc server app to logmein's servers. It keeps this connection active. Logmein then allows me to authenticate to their servers through a web browser, or one of their vnc clients (one of which is an iPad app) and run their vnc client to remotely control my work desktop. The vnc client app is the best I have used on the iPad, very intuitive. I also use it to remotely control my MacBook at home from work. I did end up uninstalling it on my work computer until I can get clearance from our security team, because it goes right around the protections they've setup (firewall). Figured I'd mention it though because it would take running windows out of the equation for you.
post #68 of 86
That's fantastic. I would always choose to use my own Mac.
post #69 of 86
Sounds like a pretty amazing place to work! Thats just too cool

Louey
Ultimate Privacy
post #70 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

I see it as an option. Do you not already have your own Mac notebook computer? If you do, the extra marginal expense is likely almost nothing if you choose to use it. And the flier says they will pay for expenses, so it could be to your advantage.

There are other good reasons to not do it though. I would suggest that people not do it, so they can keep their personal and work resources clearly divided, particularly with your data files.

Look at it this way: As long as you're willing to use your own, why would the company be willing to fork over money to buy the employees one? You see where this goes? Just a couple of employees willing to use their own Macs start a trend, where the employer now expects everyone to use their own home computers and not have to buy any. This effectively gives you a pay cut, just like as if you had a company car that gets taken away and you're now required to use your own. Sure, you already owned a car, but now have to pay more for your own maintenance, etc. for the extra use, not to mention buy a newer one sooner from the additional mileage. Many people who own company cars would rather drive their own cars, because the company cars tend to be very basic. But in doing so, they would throw away a perk.

If the company was willing to shell out similar money that they would spend for a laptop and the IT services to support it, much in the same way that some people get their company cars by having an allowance they get to spend, that would be different. But, they're not. It sounds like a good idea, but in the end, you lose.
post #71 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackzig View Post

That happens in all offices, not just the Federal government. My wife works in a hospital and porn is all over the place, despite management forbidding it.

That's a pretty broad statement... I can show you lots of banks, realtors, etc. where they don't sit around accessing porn on company computers on company time.

But, some local idiot was just arrested for accessing kiddy-porn on a public library computer.

Quote:

If you think government employees makes so much, and have it so good, apply for a job with the government. Do you have the qualifications to apply?

It's not what I think!. Here's an article that Fed. Govt. employees average 2 x the pay and 4 x the benefits than those paying their salaries.

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/op...-92316619.html

As for qualifications... here's just 1: I held a Top Secret "Q" Clearance (though never worked for the govt). It has expired, tho, as I am 70 years old.

.
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"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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post #72 of 86
.

One Post above writes ...

" ... to say that PCs do nothing useful is immature idiocy."

Is not that PC's (Windoze) do not do anything, useful or otherwise

Is that what they do is not done well

And that's only when they're working properly, which can be rarely

Simple and Elegant - Microsoft Ain't

.

Another Post above ...

Uses the words "computers" and "decades" in the same sentence

Careful

When you write about "computers" and "decades"

Be sure to bring your Punch Cards

And those 2" Magnetic Tape Reels the size of Wheels

Simple and Elegant - Them Days Ain't

.


post #73 of 86
Good to see this. IT departments are usually so clueless.

I had an IT manager tell me Macs were not supported because "they were too hard to administer and didn't network properly".

I think that means Microsoft's TCP/IP implementation was non-standard since OS/X is a recognized flavour of Unix.
post #74 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post

Look at it this way: As long as you're willing to use your own, why would the company be willing to fork over money to buy the employees one? You see where this goes? Just a couple of employees willing to use their own Macs start a trend, where the employer now expects everyone to use their own home computers and not have to buy any. This effectively gives you a pay cut, just like as if you had a company car that gets taken away and you're now required to use your own. Sure, you already owned a car, but now have to pay more for your own maintenance, etc. for the extra use, not to mention buy a newer one sooner from the additional mileage. Many people who own company cars would rather drive their own cars, because the company cars tend to be very basic. But in doing so, they would throw away a perk.

If the company was willing to shell out similar money that they would spend for a laptop and the IT services to support it, much in the same way that some people get their company cars by having an allowance they get to spend, that would be different. But, they're not. It sounds like a good idea, but in the end, you lose.

Great, a vehicular comparison?

I see what you're getting at, but there's too little real information here, such as the amount of the stipend, which could turn into a perk instead of a cost to you, because it subsidizes your personal computer.

Citrix offered a $2100 stipend:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26889537/

This site suggests a 1500 euro stipend:
http://myceolife.com/2009/01/bring-y...puter-to-work/

We'll just have to see details on the program before describing it as a slippery slope.
post #75 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZorrowQc View Post

That would certainly keep the IT department busy...
Big challenges ahead!

No kidding. From a security perspective this is assinine.
post #76 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by StLBluesFan View Post

No kidding. From a security perspective this is assinine.

Actually, if you follow some of the posts (above) on Citrix, it appears that it can be a very secure system.

The BYOC can operate as a thin-client where everything is stored and executed on servers behind secure firewalls. All communications between the servers and thin clients are encrypted, and no data or apps are stored on the client.

.
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"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #77 of 86
WinXP not allowed? But that's still the fastest OS compared to Vista and 7.
post #78 of 86
This is interesting news for the 0.00163% of the world that works for Kraft Foods.
post #79 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by akhomerun View Post

This is interesting news for the 0.00163% of the world that works for Kraft Foods.

...and for those of us who understand that when one major corporation starts, others often follow...
post #80 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by djames42 View Post

...and for those of us who understand that when one major corporation starts, others often follow...

2 years ago a German newspaper started to migrate to Mac. Not Mac only, as they also have a vacancy for a Flash Developer. Tss.

http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2008/07/...tching-to-mac/

Cheers,
Phil
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
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