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Apple announces iPad will launch in 9 more countries on May 28 - Page 2

post #41 of 136
Apple, don't forget about us!
post #42 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichyS View Post

So, my thinking is, buy a US 32 GB 3G for $729 before tax. Avoid the tax somehow (I believe you can do this buying online somehow -- happy to be educated by our US friends here); and ship to my company's NY offices. Get friendly colleague to pop iPad in the 'internal' mail and have it shipped over.

Worst case scenario, it'll be picked up by UK Customs and I'll have to pay VAT on it (at some notional base price they come up with). No import duty to pay, 'cos certain wireless devices are (for some reason) exempt.

So, I reckon it'd cost me somewhere between £500 and £550; as opposed to the £599 it would cost me in the UK. Not massively cheaper, but not to be sniffed at.

Why do we need to know this?

Best case scenario is that you get sacked for improper use of the company internal mail system.

Signed one of the idiot UK electorate you disparaged earlier.
post #43 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

so wtf good is the free trade agreement if we pay international tax anyway

What? These are your own government's national consumption taxes.
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post #44 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

You will pay sales taxes in New York at point of sale, so subtract 8-10% from your "savings."

Probably someone from NY knows their state's exact sales tax rate.

I seem to recall reading that if you buy from an 'out of state' online shop, you can avoid some or all taxes. Now, this maybe a loophole that is closed off, or I could be completely misunderstanding.

... Having just checked on Apple's eShop, estimated tax to 10174 is $64.70. Oh well.
post #45 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

What? These are your own government's national consumption taxes.

I'm not arguing that this is Apple's fault ... just that it's stupid.

I'm not 100% on VAT, but we sure as shit pay an extra 10 percent sales tax when we buy the product. I thought VAT was supposed to replace Sales Tax?

Edit: my only point is this: I also live in a bungalow in the suburbs in North America driving a car (that was likely produced in Canada though we paid more!) and get a product shipped from China, so I don't see why it should cost us 10% more!
Its like that for tons of stuff; c'est la vie. Rogers screws us too!
post #46 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

Our dollar is at 98 cents yet we still pay 10% more for the base model! Humbug!

But you are in a foreign country!
post #47 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

so wtf good is the free trade agreement if we pay international tax anyway

Softwood Lumber all over again!

(insert Hardwood Lumber joke here)

edit: they are made in China anyway, which is what rips me off.

There is no duty, i.e., international tax. However, companies shipping from the US to Canada and vice versa typically use freight forwarders to help ship cross border.

As for your last line, you really need do some homework.
post #48 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

Why do we need to know this?

Best case scenario is that you get sacked for improper use of the company internal mail system.

Signed one of the idiot UK electorate you disparaged earlier.

You don't need to know anything here. It's a discussion forum. I'm discussing options. Somebody else might even find the information useful.

Best case scenario? Thanks. You're charming.

And what makes you think that I consider the whole of the UK electorate idiots? Clearly I think some of them made the right decision. Maybe you're in that bracket.

Maybe you should drink less coffee at work. It's clearly making you tetchy.
post #49 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

I'm not arguing that this is Apple's fault ... just that it's stupid.

I'm not 100% on VAT, but we sure as shit pay an extra 10 percent sales tax when we buy the product. I thought VAT was supposed to replace Sales Tax?

Edit: my only point is this: I also live in a bungalow in the suburbs in North America driving a car (that was likely produced in Canada though we paid more!) and get a product shipped from China, so I don't see why it should cost us 10% more!
Its like that for tons of stuff; c'est la vie. Rogers screws us too!

To start, perhaps you should read this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sales_tax

As for your statement that "Rogers screw us too," there is nothing that screws you more that ignorance. And as far as I can see from you recent postings, you don't need Viagra. IMO.
post #50 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichyS View Post

I seem to recall reading that if you buy from an 'out of state' online shop, you can avoid some or all taxes. Now, this maybe a loophole that is closed off, or I could be completely misunderstanding.

... Having just checked on Apple's eShop, estimated tax to 10174 is $64.70. Oh well.

Sometimes. It's a bit of a roulette wheel. Technically online retailers are required to collect sales taxes from all customers residing in any state where the company has a presence, but this is not always done. Amazon for example collects no sales taxes for customers in California, but that doesn't mean residents don't owe them. California (and other states, I'm sure) is currently making a major effort to crack down on sales tax scofflaws.

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

I'm not arguing that this is Apple's fault ... just that it's stupid.

I'm not 100% on VAT, but we sure as shit pay an extra 10 percent sales tax when we buy the product. I thought VAT was supposed to replace Sales Tax?

I'm not sure I understand the question, but if you're in Canada you pay a VAT built into the price and we in the US pay a sales tax which is calculated and collected at point of sale. So what are you griping about?
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post #51 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Sometimes. It's a bit of a roulette wheel. Technically online retailers are required to collect sales taxes from all customers residing in any state where the company has a presence, but this is not always done. Amazon for example collects no sales taxes for customers in California, but that doesn't mean residents don't owe them. California (and other states, I'm sure) is currently making a major effort to crack down on sales tax scofflaws.



I'm not sure I understand the question, but if you're in Canada you pay a VAT built into the price and we in the US pay a sales tax which is calculated and collected at point of sale. So what are you griping about?

Canadian prices do *NOT* include tax, they never have.
post #52 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmason View Post

Canadian prices do *NOT* include tax, they never have.

But you do pay GST, correct? It's essentially the same thing, a tax on consumption. And they are included in the price, not added at point of sale, correct?
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post #53 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

But you do pay GST, correct? It's essentially the same thing, a tax on consumption. And they are included in the price, not added at point of sale, correct?

But not included in Apples pricing...

Edit: The $549 iPad will be $576.45 after 5% GST. More in provinces that also have a provincial tax.
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post #54 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

But you do pay GST, correct? It's essentially the same thing, a tax on consumption. And they are included in the price, not added at point of sale, correct?

No, it's not included in the price, anywhere in Canada. You pay at the register.
post #55 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by success View Post

Be interesting to see what the prices here in Japan will be.

Why didn't they announce the prices for all of the countries getting iPads this month at the same time?

Hopefully they will let us know tomorrow... Hope the base model comes in under ¥50,000.

 

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post #56 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

There is no duty, i.e., international tax. However, companies shipping from the US to Canada and vice versa typically use freight forwarders to help ship cross border.

As for your last line, you really need do some homework.

Why?

When i bought my computer from apple it shipped straight from China, and I paid 10% extra for it going to Toronto-Saskatoon instead of New York-Fargo?

Is Canada post more expensive? There is something missing here. Likely it has to do with exchange rates years ago or something. Thats an excuse we get often.
post #57 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichyS View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun, UK View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichyS View Post

So, my thinking is, buy a US 32 GB 3G for $729 before tax. Avoid the tax somehow (I believe you can do this buying online somehow -- happy to be educated by our US friends here); and ship to my company's NY offices. Get friendly colleague to pop iPad in the 'internal' mail and have it shipped over.

Worst case scenario, it'll be picked up by UK Customs and I'll have to pay VAT on it (at some notional base price they come up with). No import duty to pay, 'cos certain wireless devices are (for some reason) exempt.

So, I reckon it'd cost me somewhere between £500 and £550; as opposed to the £599 it would cost me in the UK. Not massively cheaper, but not to be sniffed at.

Why do we need to know this?

Best case scenario is that you get sacked for improper use of the company internal mail system.

Signed one of the idiot UK electorate you disparaged earlier.

You don't need to know anything here. It's a discussion forum. I'm discussing options. Somebody else might even find the information useful.

Best case scenario? Thanks. You're charming.

And what makes you think that I consider the whole of the UK electorate idiots? Clearly I think some of them made the right decision. Maybe you're in that bracket.

Maybe you should drink less coffee at work. It's clearly making you tetchy.

I found it useful - thanks Richy!

[emphasis mine]

And I can confirm there are indeed some very idiotic voters in the UK!
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post #58 of 136
APPLE stores have been out of stock on ALL IPADS for the last 5 days. Should be interesting to see how this launch goes when the U.S. supply is short sided. Perhaps that's the reason the U.S. supply is so short as factories are producing international models for now.
post #59 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichyS View Post

So, my thinking is, buy a US 32 GB 3G for $729 before tax. Avoid the tax somehow (I believe you can do this buying online somehow -- happy to be educated by our US friends here); and ship to my company's NY offices. Get friendly colleague to pop iPad in the 'internal' mail and have it shipped over.

Or you could buy one at the airport the next time you go on holiday, save 17.5% instantly and not have to worry about getting into trouble with customs/your company.
post #60 of 136
My iPad 3G isn't shipping 'til May 27, yet it'll be available internationally the next day? They should take care of their homegrowns first before taking care of the foreigners.
post #61 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

Or you could buy one at the airport the next time you go on holiday, save 17.5% instantly and not have to worry about getting into trouble with customs/your company.

Which airport?

If bought at a UK airport, you only get it VAT free if you are not going to bring it back to the UK.

If bought in USA then you need to declare it on arrival and pay VAT, as your personal limit for imports is £145.
post #62 of 136
I guess I should get used to paying over-the-odds for Apple gear in the UK but I kind-of hoped that, bearing in mind the reported margins that are being made on each iPad, they may be priced a little more competitively. Even taking into account today's very poor £/$ exchange rate and ignoring our 17.5% additional sales tax UK iPad prices are disappointingly 5-10% higher than their US counterparts. I'm sure pitching the entry level model at under £400 would serve Apple well.

Once Apple have squeezed the extra premium from techno-junkies and early-adopters I have no doubt the price points will drop (and I know you are going to say no-one's forcing anyone to buy it) but it still makes you feel like you're being taken for a ride. Perhaps I'll get just the one for now

For those thinking of buying, the 32Gb versions in both varieties are the least inflated over their US versions.
post #63 of 136
Canada and Australia both have free trade agreements with the US, so it's not import tariffs that are putting the price up. I don't know about the UK.
post #64 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post

But not included in Apples pricing...

Edit: The $549 iPad will be $576.45 after 5% GST. More in provinces that also have a provincial tax.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cmason View Post

No, it's not included in the price, anywhere in Canada. You pay at the register.

I stand corrected. I thought the national portion of Canada's consumption tax was included in the price, as it is virtually everywhere else.
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post #65 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by macinthe408 View Post

My iPad 3G isn't shipping 'til May 27, yet it'll be available internationally the next day? They should take care of their homegrowns first before taking care of the foreigners.

That's nice. They already delayed our shipping by a month beyond their initial announcement. If they don't ship overseas, they risk losing a large customer base (almost 50% of their sales) which makes them more profitable and thus better able to make great products.

The factories making the devices are in China and Taiwan... staffed by foreigners (from a US perspective). Should they ship to China first?

Usage stats of sales so far show that 10% of the devices are already overseas anyways.

 

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post #66 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Canada and Australia both have free trade agreements with the US, so it's not import tariffs that are putting the price up. I don't know about the UK.

It's always important to keep in mind that prices are not set by manufacturers based on exchange rates, they are based on the price of competitive goods in the country where the goods are sold. Also, given the constant flux of exchange rates, it's unrealistic to expect exported goods to immediately reflect these fluctuations. When the US dollar is weak, we're always hearing about how everyone else is being "ripped off" by Apple, but when the dollar is strong, we never seem to hear about how everybody else is getting a bargain.
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post #67 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

Our dollar is at 98 cents yet we still pay 10% more for the base model! Humbug!

You can't take the exchange rate and then say that is what a fair price should be for your country. Even if the exchange rate didn't fluctuate you aren't considering this is an actual product, not just just the value of legal tender. There are different costs associated with importing goods to foreign countries.
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post #68 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

It's always important to keep in mind that prices are not set by manufacturers based on exchange rates, they are based on the price of competitive goods in the country where the goods are sold. Also, given the constant flux of exchange rates, it's unrealistic to expect exported goods to immediately reflect these fluctuations. When the US dollar is weak, we're always hearing about how everyone else is being "ripped off" by Apple, but when the dollar is strong, we never seem to hear about how everybody else is getting a bargain.

that cause we never get a bargain
post #69 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

You can't take the exchange rate and then say that is what a fair price should be for your country. Even if the exchange rate didn't fluctuate you aren't considering this is an actual product, not just just the value of legal tender. There are different costs associated with importing goods to foreign countries.

True, obviously, but what are they? If the product is manufactured outside the US, how is the import cost any different?

If they come from China on a ship to Los Angelos, say, how is it more expensive to ship it to Vancouver than to New York?

I'm not trying to be facetious; I'm very interested in why we are paying a 10% premium north of the border. If import tax is not the source, what is?

I suppose wages might be higher for employees? edit: this seems far too regional though. If wages/lease prices were a reason, than stuff in Downtown Toronto would be more expensive than Rural Alberta. Nation-wide it seems almost impossible for these two means to be largely different between the States/Canada

edit: is also just seems askew when it would be cheaper for me to buy from Amazon.com and pay shipping than from .ca and get free shipping.
post #70 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I stand corrected. I thought the national portion of Canada's consumption tax was included in the price, as it is virtually everywhere else.

Nope, we're pretty much the same as the US. It's not just federal tax, both provincial and federal sales tax are added at the point of sale (sometimes this is combined into one harmonized rate, sometimes it's two separate items.)

That said, I think Apple's prices are fairly reasonable in Canada. A few years ago, they were often *much* higher than the exchange rate would suggest, but it's improved a lot since then. Most of the time it's just a few percent extra now.
post #71 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I stand corrected. I thought the national portion of Canada's consumption tax was included in the price, as it is virtually everywhere else.

VAT; Not sure that it is. Some are. Some aren't. Some are called differently.*
An Australian Guide on How to Get an iPad
Quote:
How much does an iPad actually cost?
Let me give you a formula for working out what the cost price of an iPad actually is. It will help you decide if the premium youre paying for having it before the local release date it worth it. Ill use the 16GB iPad for the example.

A 16GB iPad is US$499
There is sales tax in most retail stores/online stores that is not advertised. In California, it is 8.5% in New York it is 8.875% in some states like Oregon and Delaware, there is no sales tax at all. A full list of sales taxes in the USA is on Wikipedia.
Shipping one iPad from the USA to Australia, using USPS (the equivalent of Australia Post) and their 5 day service is going to be about US$60. The weight of an iPad and sufficient packaging is around 5lbs (2kg).
So if youre buying a 16GB iPad in California, the total Australian dollar price works out like so:

US$499 for the iPad itself + 8.5% sales tax (US$42.45) + shipping (US$60) = US$601.45. Convert that to AU$ and the total is AU$653.

You arent going to get an iPad for less than $653. Obviously, the price goes up for the more expensive iPads, but shipping remains the same.

Customs/Import Taxes?
Basically, if youre importing one iPad, you will not be charged any sort of tax or duty. If you are ordering two or more in the same parcel, that makes the value of the parcel more than $1,000 and hence, will attract tax. You can write gift, or declare the item to be less than the $1,000, but often Ive found that Customs somehow figures it out anyways and ends up charging you, so factor that in to your is it worth it? equation if you plan on buying a couple at once. It may work out to be cheaper to ship them individually.

If your parcel contains goods worth more than $1,000, you will be charged GST (10%) and duty (5%) as well as a brokerage fee by your mail carrier (random value depending on who youre shipping with USPS, FedEx, UPS, DHL etc.).

http://www.mactalk.com.au/2010/04/15...o-get-an-ipad/


*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_a...ax#VAT_systems
post #72 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

True, obviously, but what are they? If the product is manufactured outside the US, how is the import cost any different?

If they come from China on a ship to Los Angelos, say, how is it more expensive to ship it to Vancouver than to New York?

I'm not trying to be facetious; I'm very interested in why we are paying a 10% premium north of the border. If import tax is not the source, what is?

I suppose wages might be higher for employees? edit: this seems far too regional though. If wages/lease prices were a reason, than stuff in Downtown Toronto would be more expensive than Rural Alberta. Nation-wide it seems almost impossible for these two means to be largely different between the States/Canada

edit: is also just seems askew when it would be cheaper for me to buy from Amazon.com and pay shipping than from .ca and get free shipping.

I don't have time to get into the finer details of it (going in to see Iron Man 2) and frankly I'm not an expert, but by import tax I don't mean shipping costs. I mean the fees governments out on products that will be sold in their country that don't directly profit that country. Apple's products and built in China nut the bulk of the profit is going back to the US, not Brazil, not New Zealand.

Then there are other things that fall under "economy of scale" that allow the US to sell cheaper goods than other countries. For instance, Apple selling the exact same item to the US to many more people than any other country. Just because the HW is same across all countries that the total costs aren't higher for other countries. For instance, software for language specific countries, additional fees for regulatory testing (I doubt all countries abide by FCC regulations), new packaging and inserts for these countries, and a different power adapter. While small, these tiny increases are numerous.

Finally, there is what the market will bear. Companies don't price goods to get the exact same profit across the board. If they did then ending in 99¢ wouldn't often happen. It's all about maximizing profit. They don't love or hate us, they only want to profit as any sound company should.
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post #73 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmason View Post

Nope, we're pretty much the same as the US. It's not just federal tax, both provincial and federal sales tax are added at the point of sale (sometimes this is combined into one harmonized rate, sometimes it's two separate items.)

That said, I think Apple's prices are fairly reasonable in Canada. A few years ago, they were often *much* higher than the exchange rate would suggest, but it's improved a lot since then. Most of the time it's just a few percent extra now.

Appreciated currencies are going to provide that sort of benefit to consumers, if the currency remains appreciated over the longer term, which is the case with the Canadian dollar (at least against the US dollar). Exporters have to adjust prices lower over time to remain competitive. Manufacturers in the country with the stronger currency are going to be very unhappy, though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

VAT; Not sure that it is. Some are. Some aren't. Some are called differently.*

This article isn't entirely accurate. The base statewide sales tax in California at the moment is 8.25%, but most counties collect at least another 0.25% and some cities collect more on top of that.
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post #74 of 136
Not sure why Appleinsider didn't do the direct comparison to US prices, but :

Wi-Fi-only iPad:
16GB - $499 US, €479 Europe, £429 U.K., $549 Canadian, $629 Australian
32GB - $599 US, €579 Europe, £499 U.K., $649 Canadian, $759 Australian
64GB - $699 US, €679 Europe, £599 U.K., $749 Canadian, $879 Australian

Wi-Fi + 3G iPad
16GB - $629 US, €579 Europe, £529 U.K., $679 Canadian, $799 Australian
32GB - $729 US, €679 Europe, £599 U.K., $779 Canadian, $928 Australian
64GB - $829 US, €779 Europe, £699 U.K., $879 Canadian, $1,049 Australian

So for Canadians, it's a $50 premium accross the board. Personally, for warranty free hassle, that's worth it to me.

To clarify the Canadian Tax, the different provinces pay different prices ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sales_taxes_in_Canada ) , i.e. Alberta just pays 5% GST ( there is no provincial tax ) Ontario pays HST ( combined GST and PST ) of 13%. So really it's just like with the states. But with online prices you do pay tax, it just depends on where it is shipped as you'll pay tax based on the receiving address location.
post #75 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't have time to get into the finer details of it (going in to see Iron Man 2) and frankly I'm not an expert, but by import tax I don't mean shipping costs. I mean the fees governments out on products that will be sold in their country that don't directly profit that country. Apple's products and built in China nut the bulk of the profit is going back to the US, not Brazil, not New Zealand.

Then there are other things that fall under "economy of scale" that allow the US to sell cheaper goods than other countries. For instance, Apple selling the exact same item to the US to many more people than any other country. Just because the HW is same across all countries that the total costs aren't higher for other countries. For instance, software for language specific countries, additional fees for regulatory testing (I doubt all countries abide by FCC regulations), new packaging and inserts for these countries, and a different power adapter. While small, these tiny increases are numerous.

Finally, there is what the market will bear. Companies don't price goods to get the exact same profit across the board. If they did then ending in 99¢ wouldn't often happen. It's all about maximizing profit. They don't love or hate us, they only want to profit as any sound company should.

Can always count on Solip for an actual reply.

So, basically, the french screw us again! ... relax bonhommes I'm only joking.

I don't really buy (har har) economies of scale. That, to me, seems more of a worldwide thing (with shipping as a factor). I doubt many iPads are sold in Omaha as compared to NYS but that doesn't alter the price. The GTA has 3 million people.

I assume Canada abides by the FCC but I'm not certain, and we also use a 110V adapter etc.

I was under the impression Canada didn't have fees for American companies a la the FTA, but again, I'm fairly ignorant of that.

Anyway interesting insights. If it somehow has to do with the Canadian government than it seems like people in the penninsula, and in Vancouver especially can just start skipping over the border for things. I know thats why they have a tarrif, but if you throw away the packaging how will anyone know your iPad is new?
post #76 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by joelsalt View Post

Why?

When i bought my computer from apple it shipped straight from China, and I paid 10% extra for it going to Toronto-Saskatoon instead of New York-Fargo?

Is Canada post more expensive? There is something missing here. Likely it has to do with exchange rates years ago or something. Thats an excuse we get often.

Canada Post is more expensive. Shipping in Canada is also more expensive. There are hidden taxes floating around all over the place. Just look at the price of a trip. The taxes are often more than the price of the carrier. In addition, the nominal exchange rate is not what one actually pays. That's a reference point. Even at par you won't get a foreign currency without some kind of charge. Companies have to use some kind of projection regarding currency. They are fluctuating all over the place.

It would be very nice if the price of items for sales in the country included the taxes. It's a crazy marketing and political game. Then you have the "experts" running around telling us that consumption taxes are the best thing since sliced bread. If it were up to them they'd raise them to infinity in order to prevent all sales

The iPad pricing for Canada is actually quite reasonable. I thought it would be higher. The big unknown is the data pricing from the cell phone companies/y.

The iPad may be manufactured in the Far East, as most things are but there's a lot more to a product then the actual manufacturing. That is why we don't pay duty on covered products designed in the US.

philip
post #77 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2992 View Post

whoaa.... NO HK?!?!?!?! Cannot believe it!!!

July. Fuck. I think HK is a bigger market than a few of those other 9 countries who get it in May, plus there's no issue with pricing here, as we're pegged to the US dollar and already know the prices.

Upside: Hopefully it will come with iPhone OS 4, which means we'll get one more free upgrade than the others.
post #78 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmcd View Post

It would be very nice if the price of items for sales in the country included the taxes. It's a crazy marketing and political game. Then you have the "experts" running around telling us that consumption taxes are the best thing since sliced bread. If it were up to them they'd raise them to infinity in order to prevent all sales

In most countries with a national consumption tax, the advertised sale price includes the tax. (I was surprised to find that Canada doesn't do it this way.) This would be impossible in the US since sales taxes vary by state, county and even city.
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post #79 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Further launches in Austria, Belgium, Hong Kong, Ireland, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand and Singapore will occur in July. Apple said it will announce launch dates for nine additional countries at a later date.

Well, I was obviously wrong about the timescales when I told that Swedish chap (or chapette) that he'd probably wave to wait for 2011. I'm quite pleased to be wrong, the more the merrier after all! Not that Sweden is necessarily in the later nine, and those later nine may not get it in 2010, but if Apple are going for another big launch in a couple of months, that says a lot about their confidence in being able to ramp up the manufacture rate, and I think that means that the later nine (probably including more major european countries) stand a fair chance of getting a launch squeezed in between July and the start of the xmas rush, which would be around November.



Quote:
Update: Apple updated its press releases with international pricing for the iPad:

Wi-Fi-only iPad:
16GB - 479 Europe, £429 U.K., $549 Canadian, $629 Australian
32GB - 579 Europe, £499 U.K., $649 Canadian, $759 Australian
64GB - 679 Europe, £599 U.K., $749 Canadian, $879 Australian
Wi-Fi + 3G iPad
16GB - 579 Europe, £529 U.K., $679 Canadian, $799 Australian
32GB - 679 Europe, £599 U.K., $779 Canadian, $928 Australian
64GB - 779 Europe, £699 U.K., $879 Canadian, $1,049 Australian

I think that's pretty much as expected. Basically just currency-conversion + VAT (well, for the UK anyway) plus a small margin of error, which for Europe is to be expected at the moment - at least until Greece's finances are back under control.

Now I just want to know what (if anything) is happening with iBooks over here!
post #80 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

In most countries with a national consumption tax, the advertised sale price includes the tax. (I was surprised to find that Canada doesn't do it this way.) This would be impossible in the US since sales taxes vary by state, county and even city.

I seem to recall that Canada has national AND regional sales taxes, so the same thing applies. In Europe it's quite complicated, given freedom of movement and a generally common currency: prices are mostly quoted including tax, but for large purchases you should be paying tax at your own government's rate rather than that in the country you purchased it from, which I imagine you'd sort out with customs. I tentatively believe that the tendency is for companies selling products across Europe to fix the including-tax price instead of the excluding-tax price, despite the varying tax rates. That would have the benefit of increasing consumer confidence (since they are no longer unsure how much they'd pay) and make the company seem less discriminatory.

Frankly, I'm amazed that Americans put up with the idea of picking up an item with a price on it, and then being charged a different price - but I suppose the heavy social bias towards tipping (rather than increased wages) means that tends to happen in other scenarios anyway. It would be completely viable to quote prices including tax in the US, companies would just have to deal with a variable profit margin rather than consumers dealing with a variable cost, but I think the motivation not to move to such a scheme is the 9.99 effect: people will tend to buy things which seem to be better value without putting more than a trivial amount of thought into whether the thing actually is better value.
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