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Prosecution seeks to protect informant in Gizmodo iPhone case

post #1 of 78
Thread Starter 
Prosecutors investigating the case of the iPhone prototype that was sold to Gizmodo last month have filed an argument that says details of the search must be kept sealed to protect the identity of an informant who confidentially participated in the investigation.

A report by Wired says the filing "is the first indication that police cultivated an inside source prior to raiding the home of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen."

Wired was among the news organizations, led by the Associated Press and the LA Times, who requested that the court release the sealed search warrant affidavit that was used to raid Chen's house.

San Mateo County deputy district attorney Chris Feasel wrote that the media's right to access court documents does not outweigh the Peoples right to protect the sanctity of an ongoing investigation, nor does it outweigh the rights of the people to protect the identity of persons who may have provided information to law enforcement in confidence during the initial stages of investigation.

Chief deputy district attorney Stephen Wagstaffe earlier said the affidavit is "not a public record and thus is not subject to requests under any public-records act."

Prior to the Wired report noting an informant, it was understood that the affidavit was sealed primarily to prevent disclosure of the names of "two individuals of interest, whom police do not want to alert."

The EFF and other media groups have criticized the search as being improper because Chen's home office could be considered a newsroom, and therefore protected under shield laws designed to prevent police from investigating journalists' sources.

However, prosecutors say the search was related to a felony theft investigation rather than simply being an effort to determine Chen's sources as a journalist.
post #2 of 78
Between the lines this blurb insinuates Apple is the confidential informant?
Or am I reading too much into it?
post #3 of 78
My wild speculation is that the guy who sold the phone, turned Chen in for an immunity deal. I hope Chen looks good in orange.
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post #4 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

My wild speculation is that the guy who sold the phone, turned Chen in for an immunity deal. I hope Chen looks good in orange.

I hope he doesn't look too good in orange. He really doesn't look like he is built for jail!

Although, roof over your head, 3 meals a day...all the sex you want! Could be a good deal, I guess!
post #5 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

I hope he doesn't look too good in orange. He really doesn't look like he is built for jail!

He probably should have thought about that before he knowingly, and publicly purchased stolen property, and boasted about the fact in print and on video. Yep, I think he'd better get used to orange.
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post #6 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

He probably should have thought about that before he knowingly, and publicly purchased stolen property, and boasted about the fact in print and on video. Yep, I think he'd better get used to orange.

You guys all frothing at the mouth. I'll put it out there: regardless of what happens, unlikely that Chen is going to jail/gaol.
post #7 of 78
This is going to get worse before it gets better, for Apple.

Rinse. Repeat.
post #8 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

You guys all frothing at the mouth. I'll put it out there: regardless of what happens, unlikely that Chen is going to jail/gaol.

Agreed. Zero chance. And, the computers get returned with an apology (but it gets worse before that happens).
post #9 of 78
Why would Apple be the 'confidential informant'? Much more likely it is someone within Gawker media or a friend of Hogan's. Keep in mind that the only tellings we have of this story are from people likely to be under investigation and therefore have reason to twist facts to make themselves seem less culpable.

By the end of this, we'll understand much better why the judge OK'd the warrant on Chen's house.
post #10 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

You guys all frothing at the mouth. I'll put it out there: regardless of what happens, unlikely that Chen is going to jail/gaol.

I'm definitely frothing at the mouth to see this guy, and the publication, go down, HARD! Sigh, I don't think it will happen, either. The discussion about this issue has nothing to do with the merits of the law, and everything to do with whether people like Apple or hate them. The same goes for all of the other hot button issues around here.

No one likes Flash, but look how many fans it has attracted since Apple came out publicly against it. No one thinks Nokia has a legitimate gripe against Apple, but look at the number of people who are happy for the law suit. Everyone knows that HTC is infringing on Apple's IP, yet look at how many people there are who think that Apple should not have the right to protect any of their innovations. Everyone knows that, according to the local law, this prototype was stolen and Giz knowingly purchased stolen goods. Even with Giz bragging about the fact that they are not journalists, look at the number of people who want Chen to be protected and for Apple to get in trouble even though they were victimized. None of these are honest discussion on the merits of the issues. They are all polemics on Apple: love em' or hate em".
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post #11 of 78
Better get used to Orange? you aware if this is first offense he would probably get 30 days (suspended) and 3 years probation.. So probably would not spend a single day in jail. He would probably get arrested go in front of judge get bailed set and then get bailed out..
post #12 of 78
The media/EFF bloodhounds can bite the big one for all I care. They want the media exposure and anyone-be-dam**d for the sake of getting the next tabloid story and making a name for themselves.

I really think that in the end, Chen will get a slap on the wrist but not before they make him curl up in the shower in the fetal position crying for his mommy.

To me, the phone was stolen. There are those anarchists out there that believe otherwise but I'm all for Chen / Gizmodo being made an example of when dealing with (possibly) stolen property.
post #13 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

Everyone knows that, according to the local law, this prototype was stolen and Giz knowingly purchased stolen goods. [...] None of these are honest discussion on the merits of the issues.

As somebody above has mentioned: All that is "known" is what has been stated by those directly involved - usually NOT the most reliable of sources.

History is full of instances of "Everyone knows", only for the facts to be be revealed afterwards and often the facts are very different from what "everyone knew".

I don't really care what actually happened in the iphone/gizmodo saga, but i do get uneasy when people read a couple of statements - uncorroborated by witnesses - and take this as "fact". it's how innocent people get lynched and senseless wars get started.

best, D.
post #14 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidT View Post

As somebody above has mentioned: All that is "known" is what has been stated by those directly involved - usually NOT the most reliable of sources.

History is full of instances of "Everyone knows", only for the facts to be be revealed afterwards and often the facts are very different from what "everyone knew".

I don't really care what actually happened in the iphone/gizmodo saga, but i do get uneasy when people read a couple of statements - uncorroborated by witnesses - and take this as "fact". it's how innocent people get lynched and senseless wars get started.

best, D.

In this case, the "facts" provided by Giz are enough to convict themselves.

As for jail time, I say Chen spends just enough time in jail to get photographed behind bars. Now imagine the page views as Chen is turned into a martyr, and a symbol for all who carry the anti-Apple banner.

On the other hand, they will just post bail and that will be the end of it. Let's see if they're really hungry for page views.
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post #15 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I'm definitely frothing at the mouth to see this guy, and the publication, go down, HARD! Sigh, I don't think it will happen, either. The discussion about this issue has nothing to do with the merits of the law, and everything to do with whether people like Apple or hate them. The same goes for all of the other hot button issues around here.

No one likes Flash, but look how many fans it has attracted since Apple came out publicly against it. No one thinks Nokia has a legitimate gripe against Apple, but look at the number of people who are happy for the law suit. Everyone knows that HTC is infringing on Apple's IP, yet look at how many people there are who think that Apple should not have the right to protect any of their innovations. Everyone knows that, according to the local law, this prototype was stolen and Giz knowingly purchased stolen goods. Even with Giz bragging about the fact that they are not journalists, look at the number of people who want Chen to be protected and for Apple to get in trouble even though they were victimized. None of these are honest discussion on the merits of the issues. They are all polemics on Apple: love em' or hate em".

Completely off topic - how about another polarizer. HTML5 just doesn't perform that well on iPad: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfmbZkqORX4

I wouldn't concern myself about the interaction paradigms at issue here. For complex animation and interaction, you're simply gonna need some horsepower, whether its flash or html5.

Back on topic - Chen is dumb. But Apple are losing the PR game on this one. Speaking about PR, has Steve Jobs reached some sort of epiphany? He's been email chatty of late. Is there something to read between the lines on that?
post #16 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

..... has Steve Jobs reached some sort of epiphany? He's been email chatty of late. Is there something to read between the lines on that?

I've been wondering about that too!

I hope it's not ............ \
post #17 of 78
Lol why would he go to Jail? Its only buying stolen property, plus he probably won't get charged because 1) the phone was left on the ground, it was found, not stolen and 2) whoever found it called Apple and they said they didn't want it, what was he supposed to do? Then this guy bought it for 5 grand, hes not exactly a threat to society that needs to be locked up...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I'm definitely frothing at the mouth to see this guy, and the publication, go down, HARD! Sigh, I don't think it will happen, either. The discussion about this issue has nothing to do with the merits of the law, and everything to do with whether people like Apple or hate them. The same goes for all of the other hot button issues around here.

No one likes Flash, but look how many fans it has attracted since Apple came out publicly against it. No one thinks Nokia has a legitimate gripe against Apple, but look at the number of people who are happy for the law suit. Everyone knows that HTC is infringing on Apple's IP, yet look at how many people there are who think that Apple should not have the right to protect any of their innovations. Everyone knows that, according to the local law, this prototype was stolen and Giz knowingly purchased stolen goods. Even with Giz bragging about the fact that they are not journalists, look at the number of people who want Chen to be protected and for Apple to get in trouble even though they were victimized. None of these are honest discussion on the merits of the issues. They are all polemics on Apple: love em' or hate em".

Apple was victimized? It was their own fault one of their employs lost it at a bar.
post #18 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I'm definitely frothing at the mouth to see this guy, and the publication, go down, HARD!

that's what she said.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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post #19 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogmudbone View Post

Apple was victimized? It was their own fault one of their employs lost it at a bar.

What a foolish response.

Just because an employee misplaced an item doesn't give someone to take it and sell it to the highest bidder. That's why the law specifically states what you are required to do with found items.
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post #20 of 78
Sounds like the prosecution is having some trouble keeping their stories straight as to why they 'need' the information kept sealed. No wonder the judge last week washed his hands if it.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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post #21 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

Sounds like the prosecution is having some trouble keeping their stories straight as to why they 'need' the information kept sealed. No wonder the judge last week washed his hands if it.

Sounds like a lot of people are making a lot of noise based on rumor, speculation, and leaks of uncertain origin.

Everyone just calm down and wait for this to actually go to court.
post #22 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoryHarbin View Post

Sounds like a lot of people are making a lot of noise based on rumor, speculation, and leaks of uncertain origin.

Everyone just calm down and wait for this to actually go to court.

Good thing we are discussing it on a rumours site then.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

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post #23 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveLV702 View Post

Better get used to Orange? you aware if this is first offense he would probably get 30 days (suspended) and 3 years probation.. So probably would not spend a single day in jail. He would probably get arrested go in front of judge get bailed set and then get bailed out..

That depends on how many charges he gets laid up on. There's receiving stolen goods, but there's also potential corporate espionage.

Thompson
post #24 of 78
Chen should hope that prosecutors are as lenient on him as they were him Jobs on his illegal back dating of stocks.
post #25 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonefree View Post

Chen should hope that prosecutors are as lenient on him as they were him Jobs on his illegal back dating of stocks.

Well, a cursory glance shows me that Apple had to pay $14 million in a civil settlement over the backdating issue, and the CFO in charge was fired.

So, fine Chen $14 million dollars, and have him fired from Gawker? That's probably rougher than I'd be if I were a prosecutor
post #26 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

What a foolish response.

Just because an employee misplaced an item doesn't give someone to take it and sell it to the highest bidder. That's why the law specifically states what you are required to do with found items.

The guy who found it called Apple support and they said it wasn't theirs or they didn't want it. Now the Support aren't trained for things like this but what is the finder supposed to do? Would you turn down 5k for somethings thats clearly not stolen but found, and the owners said they didn't want it? Its a $200 prototype phone, not some million-dollar secret WMD. The only bad press Apple got from this was that the guy is getting prosecuted. If he wasn't it may of even seemed like Apple set it up to hype up iPhone 4. Apple is not "victimized" it was their fault for loosing the phone in the first place, then not taking it back.
post #27 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregoryHarbin View Post

Well, a cursory glance shows me that Apple had to pay $14 million in a civil settlement over the backdating issue, and the CFO in charge was fired.

So, fine Chen $14 million dollars, and have him fired from Gawker? That's probably rougher than I'd be if I were a prosecutor

$14 M is about 0.05% of Apple's cash. It would be like if any of us were fined $100. The CFO was fired but Jobs, who was the sole beneficiary of the situation, escaped unscated. So I'd call that lenient.
post #28 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogmudbone View Post

The guy who found it called Apple support and they said it wasn't theirs or they didn't want it. Now the Support aren't trained for things like this but what is the finder supposed to do? Would you turn down 5k for somethings thats clearly not stolen but found, and the owners said they didn't want it? Its a $200 prototype phone, not some million-dollar secret WMD. The only bad press Apple got from this was that the guy is getting prosecuted. If he wasn't it may of even seemed like Apple set it up to hype up iPhone 4. Apple is not "victimized" it was their fault for loosing the phone in the first place, then not taking it back.

Please don't bother to comment if you don't know the facts.

1) What you are say about the person who found it trying to call Apple just isn't true at all. Look it up.

2) You also don't know anything about law and trot out that old (inaccurate) saw about there being a difference between "found" and "stolen." Again, not true at all. Look it up.

3) You have it exactly backwards when you say it's a "$200" phone and not a multi-million dollar secret. It *is* a multi-million dollar secret by definition. Again, look it up.

4) Apple has never, ever "leaked" things like this for the purposes of "hyping things up,"in fact they take great care to do the exact reverse of that and always have.

It's like you come from some bizarro world where the exact opposite of the truth is believed to be true. All these facts are readily available with a simple Google search and you got every one of them completely wrong and absolutely backwards.

From this I conclude you are either purposely lying, or simply a little kid who likes to spout off on stuff he doesn't know anything about and doesn't bother to find out anything about before he spouts off.
post #29 of 78
I witnessed video's and posts on a webpage of people who stated they paid money for an object considered stolen property under Californian law.

No rumor, no speculation just an easily verifiable fact.
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post #30 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Please don't bother to comment if you don't know the facts.

1) What you are say about the person who found it trying to call Apple just isn't true at all. Look it up.

2) You also don't know anything about law and trot out that old (inaccurate) saw about there being a difference between "found" and "stolen." Again, not true at all. Look it up.

3) You have it exactly backwards when you say it's a "$200" phone and not a multi-million dollar secret. It *is* a multi-million dollar secret by definition. Again, look it up.

4) Apple has never, ever "leaked" things like this for the purposes of "hyping things up,"in fact they take great care to do the exact reverse of that and always have.

It's like you come from some bizarro world where the exact opposite of the truth is believed to be true. All these facts are readily available with a simple Google search and you got every one of them completely wrong and absolutely backwards.

From this I conclude you are either purposely lying, or simply a little kid who likes to spout off on stuff he doesn't know anything about and doesn't bother to find out anything about before he spouts off.

Well there are so many rumors its hard to even tell whats true and whats not. But I think its Apple's responsibility to protect their million dollar secrets, not drop them in a bar for whoever to find. All the guy did was sell a couple hundred $ of stolen property, any other implications were a direct result of the Apple employ who left the million dollar secret in a bar. I don't think the guy is going to Jail hes probably just has to pay a fine. IMO the best thing Apple can do right now is apologize to the guy who got his house raided over a phone, to neutralize the slew of bad press they've been getting recently including their ridiculous incident with Ellen DeGeneres, and bad press from the Daily Show. And BTW simply correcting me is fine, resorting to insults on an internet forum is actually very childish of you.
post #31 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I'm definitely frothing at the mouth to see this guy, and the publication, go down, HARD! Sigh, I don't think it will happen, either. The discussion about this issue has nothing to do with the merits of the law, and everything to do with whether people like Apple or hate them. The same goes for all of the other hot button issues around here.

No one likes Flash, but look how many fans it has attracted since Apple came out publicly against it. No one thinks Nokia has a legitimate gripe against Apple, but look at the number of people who are happy for the law suit. Everyone knows that HTC is infringing on Apple's IP, yet look at how many people there are who think that Apple should not have the right to protect any of their innovations. Everyone knows that, according to the local law, this prototype was stolen and Giz knowingly purchased stolen goods. Even with Giz bragging about the fact that they are not journalists, look at the number of people who want Chen to be protected and for Apple to get in trouble even though they were victimized. None of these are honest discussion on the merits of the issues. They are all polemics on Apple: love em' or hate em".

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post #32 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

The media/EFF bloodhounds can bite the big one for all I care. They want the media exposure and anyone-be-dam**d for the sake of getting the next tabloid story and making a name for themselves.

I really think that in the end, Chen will get a slap on the wrist but not before they make him curl up in the shower in the fetal position crying for his mommy.

To me, the phone was stolen. There are those anarchists out there that believe otherwise but I'm all for Chen / Gizmodo being made an example of when dealing with (possibly) stolen property.

Is the EFF still involved? This is clearly a case of theft.
post #33 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

before he knowingly, and publicly purchased stolen property,

From what I remember, he didn't purchase "stolen" property. The property was "lost." I think there is a difference here...
post #34 of 78
Section 485 of the California Penal code:-

"One who finds lost property under circumstances which give him
knowledge of or means of inquiry as to the true owner, and who
appropriates such property to his own use, or to the use of another
person not entitled thereto, without first making reasonable and just
efforts to find the owner and to restore the property to him, is
guilty of theft"



Source

Section 496 of the California Penal code:-

"(a) Every person who buys or receives any property that has
been stolen or that has been obtained in any manner constituting
theft or extortion, knowing the property to be so stolen or obtained,
or who conceals, sells, withholds, or aids in concealing, selling,
or withholding any property from the owner, knowing the property to
be so stolen or obtained, shall be punished by imprisonment in a
state prison, or in a county jail for not more than one year.
However, if the district attorney or the grand jury determines that
this action would be in the interests of justice, the district
attorney or the grand jury, as the case may be, may, if the value of
the property does not exceed nine hundred fifty dollars ($950),
specify in the accusatory pleading that the offense shall be a
misdemeanor, punishable only by imprisonment in a county jail not
exceeding one year.
A principal in the actual theft of the property may be convicted
pursuant to this section. However, no person may be convicted both
pursuant to this section and of the theft of the same property.
(b) Every swap meet vendor, as defined in Section 21661 of the
Business and Professions Code, and every person whose principal
business is dealing in, or collecting, merchandise or personal
property, and every agent, employee, or representative of that
person, who buys or receives any property of a value in excess of
nine hundred fifty dollars ($950) that has been stolen or obtained in
any manner constituting theft or extortion, under circumstances that
should cause the person, agent, employee, or representative to make
reasonable inquiry to ascertain that the person from whom the
property was bought or received had the legal right to sell or
deliver it, without making a reasonable inquiry, shall be punished by
imprisonment in a state prison, or in a county jail for not more
than one year.
Every swap meet vendor, as defined in Section 21661 of the
Business and Professions Code, and every person whose principal
business is dealing in, or collecting, merchandise or personal
property, and every agent, employee, or representative of that
person, who buys or receives any property of a value of nine hundred
fifty dollars ($950) or less that has been stolen or obtained in any
manner constituting theft or extortion, under circumstances that
should cause the person, agent, employee, or representative to make
reasonable inquiry to ascertain that the person from whom the
property was bought or received had the legal right to sell or
deliver it, without making a reasonable inquiry, shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor.
(c) Any person who has been injured by a violation of subdivision
(a) or (b) may bring an action for three times the amount of actual
damages, if any, sustained by the plaintiff, costs of suit, and
reasonable attorney's fees.
(d) Notwithstanding Section 664, any attempt to commit any act
prohibited by this section, except an offense specified in the
accusatory pleading as a misdemeanor, is punishable by imprisonment
in the state prison, or in a county jail for not more than one year."


Source

OK, seems pretty clear to me, now grab the tar and pitchforks and follow me, whoohoo, weez gunna have us a good ol' fashioned lynchin'!

Quote:
Originally Posted by justbobf View Post

From what I remember, he didn't purchase "stolen" property. The property was "lost." I think there is a difference here...
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post #35 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogmudbone View Post

Well there are so many rumors its hard to even tell whats true and whats not. But I think its Apple's responsibility to protect their million dollar secrets, not drop them in a bar for whoever to find. All the guy did was sell a couple hundred $ of stolen property, any other implications were a direct result of the Apple employ who left the million dollar secret in a bar. I don't think the guy is going to Jail hes probably just has to pay a fine. IMO the best thing Apple can do right now is apologize to the guy who got his house raided over a phone, to neutralize the slew of bad press they've been getting recently including their ridiculous incident with Ellen DeGeneres, and bad press from the Daily Show. And BTW simply correcting me is fine, resorting to insults on an internet forum is actually very childish of you.

i have to disagree. if i find something that belongs to someone--like their phone--i'd try to return it to them, not attempt to sell it to a 'news' site for several grand.

the act of selling it alone tells you either this guy knew exactly what he had or he has a really screwed up sense of the difference between right and wrong.

if i couldn't get a hold of the owner, i would have left it at the bar. hell, even if apple support didn't want it, i would have packaged the thing up and returned it to apple.

regardless of the outcome, these guys made their choices and now have to deal with the consequences. life isn't like 'reality' t.v.
post #36 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogmudbone View Post

Well there are so many rumors its hard to even tell whats true and whats not. But I think its Apple's responsibility to protect their million dollar secrets, not drop them in a bar for whoever to find. All the guy did was sell a couple hundred $ of stolen property, any other implications were a direct result of the Apple employ who left the million dollar secret in a bar. I don't think the guy is going to Jail hes probably just has to pay a fine. IMO the best thing Apple can do right now is apologize to the guy who got his house raided over a phone, to neutralize the slew of bad press they've been getting recently including their ridiculous incident with Ellen DeGeneres, and bad press from the Daily Show. And BTW simply correcting me is fine, resorting to insults on an internet forum is actually very childish of you.

Your original comments were totally off-base according to majority of information available, but I do agree the comments below are very childish. You can point out someone is factual incorrect, but no need for kindergarden behavior, no need!

Everyone is allowed to comment, it is responsible of other people to provide their opinions/facts to correct that person in constructive, proactive manner, that allows all of us to debate in a civilized fashion. Unfortunately the world is not like that for many people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Please don't bother to comment if you don't know the facts.

1) What you are say about the person who found it trying to call Apple just isn't true at all. Look it up.

2) You also don't know anything about law and trot out that old (inaccurate) saw about there being a difference between "found" and "stolen." Again, not true at all. Look it up.

3) You have it exactly backwards when you say it's a "$200" phone and not a multi-million dollar secret. It *is* a multi-million dollar secret by definition. Again, look it up.

4) Apple has never, ever "leaked" things like this for the purposes of "hyping things up,"in fact they take great care to do the exact reverse of that and always have.

It's like you come from some bizarro world where the exact opposite of the truth is believed to be true. All these facts are readily available with a simple Google search and you got every one of them completely wrong and absolutely backwards.

From this I conclude you are either purposely lying, or simply a little kid who likes to spout off on stuff he doesn't know anything about and doesn't bother to find out anything about before he spouts off.
post #37 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

In this case, the "facts" provided by Giz are enough to convict themselves.

You are wrong, so situation normal.

This will never go to trial and there will be no charges brought against Chen.
post #38 of 78
Quote:
Prosecutors investigating the case of the iPhone prototype that was sold to Gizmodo last month have filed an argument that says details of the search must be kept sealed to protect the identity of an informant who confidentially participated in the investigation.

A report by Wired says the filing "is the first indication that police cultivated an inside source prior to raiding the home of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen."



Are they trying to cover up the identity of Steve Jobs who alerted police as soon as he read the report published by Gizmodo? In this case, Steve Jobs doesn't want us to know that he is an avid reader of rumor sites!


post #39 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogmudbone View Post

Well there are so many rumors its hard to even tell whats true and whats not. But I think its Apple's responsibility to protect their million dollar secrets, not drop them in a bar for whoever to find. All the guy did was sell a couple hundred $ of stolen property, any other implications were a direct result of the Apple employ who left the million dollar secret in a bar. I don't think the guy is going to Jail hes probably just has to pay a fine. IMO the best thing Apple can do right now is apologize to the guy who got his house raided over a phone, to neutralize the slew of bad press they've been getting recently.....

Prototype chips cases etc are not worth 'a couple hundred dollars', but obviously much more. Apple does not give a hoot what Ellen thinks. It does care about keeping it's plans from HTC, Nokia, etc as long as possible. As Apple is an American company, employing American enginners etc, I fully support that. Apple did not conduct the search.
Your statements are inaccurate, contradictory and make no sense.
Please stop.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
post #40 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogmudbone View Post

Well there are so many rumors its hard to even tell whats true and whats not. But I think its Apple's responsibility to protect their million dollar secrets, not drop them in a bar for whoever to find. All the guy did was sell a couple hundred $ of stolen property, any other implications were a direct result of the Apple employ who left the million dollar secret in a bar. I don't think the guy is going to Jail hes probably just has to pay a fine. IMO the best thing Apple can do right now is apologize to the guy who got his house raided over a phone, to neutralize the slew of bad press they've been getting recently including their ridiculous incident with Ellen DeGeneres, and bad press from the Daily Show. And BTW simply correcting me is fine, resorting to insults on an internet forum is actually very childish of you.

After taking a look at your other posts since joining this form on 05-02-2010 it is clear you are a typical Apple hater who joined an Apple centric forum just to spout FUD. You are even using the talking points being spread around by your colleagues, specifically the "Apple should apologize" and the "bad press" mantras. This is textbook FUD. In light of your posting trail it would be interesting to know why you chose AppleInsider but you are probably on other Apple sites using different sock puppets. Bottom line, you are way to obvious, a rookie perhaps. That's why your age was questioned.
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