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Apple repeals no-cash policy, gives woman free iPad for her troubles

post #1 of 94
Thread Starter 
After a San Francisco, Calif., news report highlighted a woman who was denied the ability to purchase an iPad with cash, Apple has reversed its policy and rewarded the woman by giving her the hardware for free.

Diane Campbell lives on a fixed income, and saved up money to buy an iPad from an Apple store in San Francisco. But when she attempted to purchase the device with cash, she was denied, based on an Apple policy designed to ensure the product is fairly distributed as the hardware is in short supply.

"Mr. Jobs, give a sister a break, OK?" she told the KGO-TV San Francisco news station. "I'm not going to go sell my iPad."

After the station featured Campbell's story, Apple responded. Ron Johnson, Apple's senior vice president of retail, spoke with the newscast to reveal that Apple would no longer continue its credit-only policy.

"It came to our attention that Diane, through your story was very interested in buying an iPad with cash," Johnson said. "And we made a decision today to change that."

Apple's original intent was to make sure that its policy restricting iPad preorders to two per customer was properly enforced. Apple has faced strong demand and limited supply of the iPad since it first launched in the U.S. on April 3.



Now, anyone can pay for an iPad with cash, as long as they set up their Apple account at the store. The iPad must first be connected to a PC or Mac with iTunes to be activated regardless.

Apple also sent two employees to Campbell's home to personally deliver her an iPad, free of charge. She excitedly thanked Apple co-founder Steve Jobs.

"I am just so excited," she said to the ABC station holding her brand new iPad enclosed in Apple's official case. "Words cannot explain right now."
post #2 of 94
Another example of free advertising from Apple. Great story, great ending!
post #3 of 94
A great PR gesture! I am seeing news reports of this all over. What a "feel good" story.

You could not buy this kind of advertising!
post #4 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamw View Post

A great PR gesture! I am seeing news reports of this all over. What a "feel good" story.

You could not buy this kind of advertising!

Sure you can. For the price of an iPad. Obviously. :P
post #5 of 94
I went with my 12 year old nephew last week who cleaned out his savings account of good grade rewards, birthday money etc to buy an ipad. All cash. It was our second trip since the first time they were sold out and we had to sign up to wait for one.

I didn't know about the policy, but wasn't going to raise a fuss since I'm aware (from having done retail myself) that there's nothing illegal about the restriction. I was going to buy the ipad for him with my debit card and then go deposit his cash into my account on the way home.

But then I figured give it a shot and politely asked to speak to a manager. This by the way was an an LA store in an area that is rumored to get a lot of resellers trying to buy stuff.

I explained the situation to the manager who totally waived the rule and let Lucas buy his ipad himself, with cash. The manager even rang Lucas up himself, helped him activate the ipad and told him about a couple of games his son (who is about the same age) really likes.

Kind of makes me wonder if Ms Campbell actually spoke to a manager or just took her no and her indignation out the door and to ABC.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

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A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #6 of 94
She should have asked Steve Jobs to sign it, posted on eBay and made an even bigger profit IMO.
post #7 of 94
"designed to prevent ensure the product"

Should the word "prevent" be here?

"spoke with the newscast to reveal that Apple would no longer institute its cash-only policy."

Shouldn't this be "its no-cash policy" or "credit-only"

Honestly, please take a moment and read what you write before you post it. Or have someone else proof it. That's a pretty common editorial procedure.
post #8 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I went with my 12 year old nephew last week who cleaned out his savings account of good grade rewards, birthday money etc to buy an ipad. All cash. It was our second trip since the first time they were sold out and we had to sign up to wait for one.

I didn't know about the policy, but wasn't going to raise a fuss since I'm aware (from having done retail myself) that there's nothing illegal about the restriction. I was going to buy the ipad for him with my debit card and then go deposit his cash into my account on the way home.

But then I figured give it a shot and politely asked to speak to a manager. This by the way was an an LA store in an area that is rumored to get a lot of resellers trying to buy stuff.

I explained the situation to the manager who totally waived the rule and let Lucas buy his ipad himself, with cash. The manager even rang Lucas up himself, helped him activate the ipad and told him about a couple of games his son (who is about the same age) really likes.

Kind of makes me wonder if Ms Campbell actually spoke to a manager or just took her no and her indignation out the door and to ABC.

What a nice gesture by that manager!
post #9 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

...
I explained the situation to the manager who totally waived the rule and let Lucas buy his ipad himself, with cash. The manager even rang Lucas up himself, helped him activate the ipad and told him about a couple of games his son (who is about the same age) really likes.

Kind of makes me wonder if Ms Campbell actually spoke to a manager or just took her no and her indignation out the door and to ABC.

Although I do generally get annoyed when someone who complains loudly gets special treatment, Apple did right thing here. I'm sure there are people like me who never ask to see the manager and would just walk away disappointed. Now thanks to her story making the news, all the stores will have better processes for dealing with cash customers.

Also it's good to hear that your Apple store treated you well without having to go any higher than the store manager.
post #10 of 94
She can use the money she saved to buy a PC to activate, backup and update her iPad.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #11 of 94
It says so on our money.

I had an idiot in an art store in San Francisco try to refuse to sell me a poster for cash, insisting on a credit card. When I offered to come back with the police, I got my poster...for cash.
post #12 of 94
Hey Jobs!!! I don't have money to buy a new 13" MacBook Pro, and I want it SO, SO BADLY. Send me one please. I swear I will notify any major news sites about my history, I SWEAR!!!!
lvidal.-
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lvidal.-
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post #13 of 94
Quote:
Apple would no longer institute its cash-only policy.

Institute? Don't you mean "continue?" Institute means to begin, not continue!

Who preefrood this article anyway? Some person in some offshore detention camp?
post #14 of 94
I am a bit surprised that AI is getting to such stories so late. It was all over the web more than 24 hours ago....

In the meantime, it has been commented upon ad nauseam.
post #15 of 94
Darn.

I should have thought about complaining myself.

Still happy as clams with my purchase though.
post #16 of 94
@ Wildcatherder

Quote:
Valid for all debts public and private
It says so on our money.
I had an idiot in an art store in San Francisco try to refuse to sell me a poster for cash, insisting on a credit card. When I offered to come back with the police, I got my poster...for cash.

Umm... yeah. Actually there is no legal requirement for a business or person selling something to accept your cash. They are required to accept your cash as payment for any prior DEBT -- but before there is a sale of goods, there is no debt. In other words, you're not attempting to pay an existing debt with cash when you buy something at a retail store.

If you bother to do a little research, you'll discover that it's perfectly legal for businesses to refuse to accept cash for purchases or services.
post #17 of 94
edit: Pipped by slicedbread.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #18 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ecphorizer View Post

Institute? Don't you mean "continue?" Institute means to begin, not continue!

Who preefrood this article anyway? Some person in some offshore detention camp?

With all these errors, Im forced to believe, Apple iPad spellcheck sucks, it needs a grammar check as well. These days people are so lazy to just read before posting their stuff
post #19 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildcatherder View Post

It says so on our money.

I had an idiot in an art store in San Francisco try to refuse to sell me a poster for cash, insisting on a credit card. When I offered to come back with the police, I got my poster...for cash.

Just because it is a valid form of payment does not mean a seller is legally obligated to take it. If he had called your bluff and you had taken your stunt to the police, I'm pretty sure they would have laughed you out of the building. That's exactly like threatening to sue a place because they don't accept checks or don't have a credit card machine. It's all the same money, regardless if it's paper, plastic, or whatever. It's the seller's right to accept or deny whatever he/she wants. If you don't like the policy, shop elsewhere.
post #20 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildcatherder View Post

It says so on our money.

I had an idiot in an art store in San Francisco try to refuse to sell me a poster for cash, insisting on a credit card. When I offered to come back with the police, I got my poster...for cash.

A debt, simply, is when you owe something to someone for providing you with something that has value. Apple does not have to accept your cash, extensibly refusing to serve you, because you have no debt with them, yet. This is similar to kicking someone out of your store for wearing a hat. It's a refusal to serve, which is quite legal.
post #21 of 94
And I'm neither the only, nor the fastest, person who knows this and decided to respond.
post #22 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

She can use the money she saved to buy a PC to activate, backup and update her iPad.

*cough cough* you meant mac
post #23 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsmythe00 View Post

*cough cough* you meant mac

All marketing aside, Macs are personal computers.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #24 of 94
Steve Jobs > Disneys largest shareholder

Disney > owns ABC

ABC reports > Apple product as news

Apple CEO > Steve Jobs

IT'S A CONSPIRACY!!
post #25 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

Kind of makes me wonder if Ms Campbell actually spoke to a manager or just took her no and her indignation out the door and to ABC.

I'd almost guarantee that she didn't speak to anyone except ABC. And I wonder if she would have received a free one if she was white?\
post #26 of 94
I wouldn't have hesitated to sell her that iPad with cash, even if I had to use my credit card to buy it and then take her cash. I'm sure she would have received that response had she politely explained her situation to a manager. Although I've run into many power-trippin' managers over the years incapable of thinking outside the box.

I love a happy ending.
post #27 of 94
i'm thinking it has gotta be an employee-by-employee policy.

i was at the san francisco/union square store on 04/15. waiting for an employee to do something while he was helping me. i was standing at the counter. during my wait time i saw one guy get two ipads and pay for them with a stack of twenties. seemed to me he was a tourist and had just visited an atm. lots. and there was no activation. and then another guy bought two as well. paid for one with a card and paid for the other with cash. again, no activation.

and that's what i love about corporate america. silly, inconsistent policies.

as an aside, anyone else getting spam courtesy of a compromised appleinsider system? http://forums.appleinsider.com/showthread.php?t=109618
"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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"Personally, I would like nothing more than to thoroughly proof each and every word of my articles before posting. But I can't."

appleinsider's mike campbell, august 15, 2013
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post #28 of 94
Ugh this whole story has been pissing my off for the last couple of days. You know how many people have paid with cash and never made a big stink about it? I can't believe Apple wasted an iPad on this stupid lady. How hard would it have been to go buy a prepaid card with her cash on it? It's not like it was all that big of an ordeal... "she saved for her iPad for sooo long!" Two weeks!! That is not a long time! If it was more like 5 months since the initial announcement on her supposed fixed income, I would definitely feel badly about the situation.

This just shows people that if they get all huffy about the situation, they deserve stuff for free. That is dumb. She could have just talked to the management and used her own "hard-earned" dollars to buy it like she should have in the first place. It's obvious from comments that management will waive this "rule" when presented with reasoned explanations.

"I don't want to use a credit card! Can I have this for free??" Pffft.
post #29 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I explained the situation to the manager who totally waived the rule and let Lucas buy his ipad himself, with cash. The manager even rang Lucas up himself, helped him activate the ipad and told him about a couple of games his son (who is about the same age) really likes.

Kind of makes me wonder if Ms Campbell actually spoke to a manager or just took her no and her indignation out the door and to ABC.

To be honest, based on Apple's past actions I wouldn't be surprised if Apple would have fired the manager. They fired the guy who showed Woz an iPad, which is ridiculous.

I have no knowledge of the cash vs. credit card subject but is it not illegal to refuse legal tender as payment for goods and services? Regardless of that, it's also in Apple's best interests to not only allow payment of any kind but to also make sure they are maintaining equal access to all persons.
post #30 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamiltonrrwatch View Post

I'd almost guarantee that she didn't speak to anyone except ABC. And I wonder if she would have received a free one if she was white?\

I really don't think there is any call for the racist implications.
post #31 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenclaw View Post

I have no knowledge of the cash vs. credit card subject but is it not illegal to refuse legal tender as payment for goods and services?

That has already been discussed.

Quote:
Regardless of that, it's also in Apple's best interests to not only allow payment of any kind but to also make sure they are maintaining equal access to all persons.

No, it's not in Apple or the consumer's best interests to all people to buy up every single iPad and sell them at inflated rates elsewhere.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #32 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

I really don't think there is any call for the racist implications.

Nothing racist about my comment. As a man of color, I see this every day. Maybe you need to move the racist bus out of your line of sight
post #33 of 94
[QUOTE=Goldenclaw;1636180]To be honest, based on Apple's past actions I wouldn't be surprised if Apple would have fired the manager. They fired the guy who showed Woz an iPad, which is ridiculous./QUOTE]

What an absurd argument.

The store manager followed Apple's policy. Why should Apple fire him for following policy.

The person who showed Woz the iPad violated Apple's policy. Why shouldn't Apple be able to fire someone for blatantly violating policy?

You trolls have gone downhill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenclaw View Post

I have no knowledge of the cash vs. credit card subject but is it not illegal to refuse legal tender as payment for goods and services? Regardless of that, it's also in Apple's best interests to not only allow payment of any kind but to also make sure they are maintaining equal access to all persons.

Since you admit that you don't know what you're talking about, why are you posting? Others have already answered this.

The bottom line is that Apple has a reason for requiring credit cards. Maybe they don't want that much cash in the store. Maybe they want to track owners to make sure that no one is buying 100 units and selling them on the black market. Whatever their reason, it's a pretty good bet that Apple knows their business better than you do.


To AI, please change your headline. Apple didn't repeal the policy, they made an exception (actually, they didn't even do that since she didn't pay cash for her iPad, anyway. Apple chose to give away an iPad for PR. That has nothing to do with repealing their policy as you've alleged.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #34 of 94
WOW...there's an Apple store somewhere with iPads in stock???
post #35 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenclaw View Post


I have no knowledge of the cash vs. credit card subject but is it not illegal to refuse legal tender as payment for goods and services?

Actually, it's not. This from the Federal Reserve website:
The pertinent portion of law ... is the Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

This statute means that all United States money as identified above are a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.
post #36 of 94
[QUOTE=jragosta;1636195]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goldenclaw View Post

To AI, please change your headline. Apple didn't repeal the policy, they made an exception (actually, they didn't even do that since she didn't pay cash for her iPad, anyway. Apple chose to give away an iPad for PR. That has nothing to do with repealing their policy as you've alleged.

I think you're incorrect. Unless the news reports have it wrong (and that's certainly possible), Apple has indeed changed their policy and will now accept cash for iPads from anyone.

If Apple's intention was to limit people from buying more than X number of iPads, I don't see how paying with a credit card helps them anyway. Do they search the database for previous purchases to the same name before selling you an iPad? Does Apple really store every purchase from every store in a common database accessible by all stores? Somehow I think revealing past purchases to a store employee might be illegal in some states. And if they're not doing that, then how are they limiting sales?

Besides, the company I consult for does iPad development and we've probably purchased at least 30-40 iPads at retail and they were all charged to the same one or two credit cards and we weren't prevented from doing so. The Apple store had no idea we were a developer.

Also, just as with the iPhone, within a month or so there won't be any shortages and all this silliness will end anyway. We've never had any problems acquiring iPads anyway...we've just walked into the Fifth Avenue, NYC store and bought them.
post #37 of 94
"that there's nothing illegal about the restriction"

Actually it is illegal to refuse to accept cash as a form of payment in a retail store. The only limitation is on how much can be in the form of coinage.




Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

I went with my 12 year old nephew last week who cleaned out his savings account of good grade rewards, birthday money etc to buy an ipad. All cash. It was our second trip since the first time they were sold out and we had to sign up to wait for one.

I didn't know about the policy, but wasn't going to raise a fuss since I'm aware (from having done retail myself) that there's nothing illegal about the restriction. I was going to buy the ipad for him with my debit card and then go deposit his cash into my account on the way home.

But then I figured give it a shot and politely asked to speak to a manager. This by the way was an an LA store in an area that is rumored to get a lot of resellers trying to buy stuff.

I explained the situation to the manager who totally waived the rule and let Lucas buy his ipad himself, with cash. The manager even rang Lucas up himself, helped him activate the ipad and told him about a couple of games his son (who is about the same age) really likes.

Kind of makes me wonder if Ms Campbell actually spoke to a manager or just took her no and her indignation out the door and to ABC.
the rev
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the rev
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post #38 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

She can use the money she saved to buy a PC to activate, backup and update her iPad.

If I were her I would get a Mac mini. Since she was using it to further her guitar playing should would have Garage Band on the Mac mini to use.
post #39 of 94
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

Actually, it's not. This from the Federal Reserve website:
The pertinent portion of law ... is the Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

This statute means that all United States money as identified above are a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.

Thanks for doing us the favor in this research. Being a banker, I get this asked from time to time and too explain it to folks how it works is challenge. But I do tell them that the merchant had better take cash other wise I would not do business with them as it's Federal Law to take US currency (as noted above) and some take forms of foreign currency if they wish. Nice work!
Mr. Scott
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Mr. Scott
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post #40 of 94
Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

Umm... yeah. Actually there is no legal requirement for a business or person selling something to accept your cash. They are required to accept your cash as payment for any prior DEBT -- but before there is a sale of goods, there is no debt. In other words, you're not attempting to pay an existing debt with cash when you buy something at a retail store.

If you bother to do a little research, you'll discover that it's perfectly legal for businesses to refuse to accept cash for purchases or services.[/QUOTE]
the rev
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