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Apple's success forces Microsoft to 'shake up' phone, media teams - Page 2

post #41 of 80
"Microsoft's woes in mobile phones are particularly troubling for the company."
Here's to hoping Microsoft's woes continue in every aspect, not just mobile phones.
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http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

Never argue with idiots, they'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. - a bumper sticker

Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
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post #42 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Microsoft has an advantage that Apple and Google do not, in that business is smitten with them.

I'm sure if they released a half decent smartphone that integrated well with all their enterprise servers, business would prefer their employees to use these.

The trouble they have through, it that phones are very personal to people, and people would rather choose their own. Of course, faced with a choice of free Microsoft phone from the boss, or your own phone that you pay for, a lot of people might choose the former.

Which is why I have a Blackberry Bold, and not the iPhone.
post #43 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

My kid's friend has a Zune. It is pretty slick.

Well, there's one .... now where in hell is the other one? .... Oh, almost missed it ... Gulf Coast.
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
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See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
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post #44 of 80
"Helmsman, crank the engines to full throttle. And send somebody out there to move all the deck chairs from the port side onto the starboard side! We're unsinkable, you know!"

It seems like a really bad idea to re-org just as you are about to launch your new phone series, unless they have been operating under the new organization structure for a while and this is just a formal announcement. But I'm not sure how this is supposed to engender confidence in customers, carriers, or the developer community.
post #45 of 80
Great companies produce; mediocre companies reorganize.
Please don't be insane.
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post #46 of 80
Lol Allard was the Only guy at Microsoft to introduce a (initially botched but overall) widely successful consumer device - the xbox. Everything else at MS is about the enterprise. I suggest MS exit the consumer market and focus on making enterprise products that it has been so successful at doing so far. Maybe compete with BlackBerry and focus on collaboration software. I think MS has lost the consumer market to Andoid and Apple in the phone department and netbooks will soon run Android/Chrome OS or iOS.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
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--SHEFFmachine out
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post #47 of 80
This article is complete garbage!
First and foremost Google just makes the Android OS. What hasn't been said is that LG, MOTO, HTC etc are competitors. But it has become the NORM to group all the Android phone carriers as ONE COMPANY. It ain't so.
Moreover, even when MS does release their new mobile OS later this year it won't be MS' hardware but that of, again, competing cell phone makers. MS' Ballmer already said he doesn't want to do hardware only software. I reckon hardware is just too darn expensive and complicated so let some other dooosh handle that.
Now, I'm so pissed that people have gotten so worked up over that courier device. What we all saw was a fantasy product where the folks that produced it just made a cartoon. And a cartoon ain't programming. however if you want a courier like device take the time to make a piece of software. hell, look at Halo and Bayonetta.
The point? They are interactive. So the technology is within reach to anybody with the time and talent at hand.
post #48 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by senseimike2 View Post

I would have loved to see what the Courier could do. Could be that they couldn't deliver on the concept...but it did look like a cool device and seems a poor decision by Microsoft to cancel it.

Looking carefully at the form factor numbers, we're talking about a folding device that opened up was almost an inch thick - so folded it was nearly two inches thick, and roughly 5x7 inches (closed) and a bit over a pound. Talk about a brick! And Nelly phone home! It was slated to run WinCE6 on Tegra 2.

The concepts were cool (like the Surface for example) but the execution and form factor were fails IMHO.
post #49 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Microsoft has an advantage that Apple and Google do not, in that business is smitten with them.

I'm sure if they released a half decent smartphone that integrated well with all their enterprise servers, business would prefer their employees to use these.

The trouble they have through, it that phones are very personal to people, and people would rather choose their own. Of course, faced with a choice of free Microsoft phone from the boss, or your own phone that you pay for, a lot of people might choose the former.

the bean counters. Our Engineering Board has a frantic love/hate attitude about Redmond - love the fact that M/soft staffs a couple of fill-time high-level engineers to help manage the AD/.Net environments here, but hate the fact that the only thing keeping things going is having those senior engineers on-board at all times.

Ohhhh, but we saved billions in upfront costs - to spend later in support costs.
post #50 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

My kid's friend has a Zune. It is pretty slick.

see, if you wipe it off once in a while it isn't so slick - or put it in one of those rubberized cases - makes it easier to hold in your hand...
post #51 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

You are preaching the sort of "accepted wisdom" here, but I'm not so sure it will be true this time.

While not being aimed at business per se, the iPhone has already made significant inroads into enterprise. I think it likely that the new iPhone 4 will be hugely more successful in that market than the original was, given it's design and the new OS. If rumours are true of Apple going multi-carrier in the USA, then we can also assume they will take a huge bite out of the subscribers of all the other networks. That kind of momentum (on top of the momentum they already have) will be hard to beat.

Overall, I think that what we are looking at with iPhone and the iPad is an entirely new platform taking shape. To me, that makes a lot of your analysis wrong-headed to the degree that it's based on past trends. Platforms are usually defined by the early market and iPhone OS dominates the early market. It's the standard that all others are striving towards and will be judged by. IMO iPhone OS won't ever be the entire market like Windows was in the desktop years, but there is no reason it can't dominate. People are just used to Apple having the minority share, there is no good reason why it has to be true anymore, especially in this new market.

The comparisons being made by analysts today to market share arguments from the desktop years may be quite misleading. At least for the time being, the traditionally Apple-owned "premium" segment of this market is actually the main segment. No one is going to make much money right now pushing "good enough" technology in the mobile market IMO. They are just filling up customers pockets until those customers eventually and inevitably buy their iPhones at some point down the road.

I agree that the trend will be for Apple to increase its iPhone inroads into the enterprise. Most of the pieces necessary for IT acceptance and support are already present in the iPhone platform (or soon will be).

The thing I find interesting is that hardly anyone is talking about the iPad inroads into the enterprise. I mean everything from small enterprises (restaurants, shops) to large enterprises (business, medical, education, government).

With the iPad, not only can you consume content, but you can present content, be it a menu in a coffee shop or an image in a doctor's office.

The guy who says: "Let me show you..." will, likely, be wielding an iPad!

And, the "show-ee" will be just as comfortable manipulating the content as the "show-er".

When the first computer labs went into the classroom, it was amazing to see the difference in the kids. They were used to leaning back and watching a presenter display content (film, video, overhead, flipcharts, chalkboard, etc.). With the computer, they were leaning forward and participating!

When the presenter gets the participation of the audience, it's magic! And, he has, likely, closed the deal!

The salesman in an auto dealership, sees that you are interested in a car... He pulls up a [rotatable] 3D image and hands you the iPad so you design the car with your colors, fabrics, accessories... Gotcha!


Just think of the iPad's collaboration potential-- while sitting around the table in the board room, sitting in the classroom or around the world.

It ain't there yet, but it's comin'

.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
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post #52 of 80
OMG!!!
Microsoft even copied Jonathan Ive!

J Allard.
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post #53 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Did you mean exciting prune, or exiting prune?

.

Thats a meaning of life question, isn't it?
if you fall and forget to hit the ground are you flying?
If there was no poo would there be a zune?
Is not an exiting prune more then likely an exciting prune?
Especially when standing in line and no rest room in sight? ;-)
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post #54 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

Microsoft is not dying any kind of death. Not slow and painful. Indeed, it is growing.

And the company that is best competing with Apple in the mobile space does NOT engineer hardware. Microsoft beat the pants off of Apple on the desktop, and they don't make computers. Android is starting to outsell the iPhone OS, and Google doesn't make phones.

In terms of ecosystem, Android has all the major apps, and many, many exclusive apps. Cases and accessories - The iPhone has everybody beat, but the Nexus One has better docks.

I don't think that anybody can predict which strategy will be best this time around, or whether any particular strategy is clearly a winner or a loser.

..I'll write according your paragraphs above..

Yes agree, Microsoft is not dying. Hell, it is a giant company with loads of cash piling in some corner of its office. Growing? Yes of course, but slowly perhaps. Because every business companies and enterprise out there are still, and perhaps will still in the future, use Windows OS and Office. But remember, people aren't exactly fully satisfied yet with Windows 7, many are still linger to the good old Windows XP.

Yes, Microsoft beats Apple in the desktop market, but not in term of user experience and GUI and ease of use, and other things that fall into that kind of criteria. Mac is better than Windows, but Mac's market share is not better than Windows. Why? It's a no brainer, just like you said it yourself.. Because Microsoft doesn't make computers, Microsoft only make softwares and then sell them all to every PC out there.
Android is starting to outsell iPhone OS, most probably true. Of course, because Android is an open mobile platform and many mobile manufacturers around the globe is adopting it, so yeah of course it'll outsell iPhone for sure.
Oh and by the way, are you sure Google doesn't make phone? Is Nexus not Google's? Yeah Nexus is made by HTC, not directly made by Google. But how does it not different from Apple who outsourced the making of iPhone to Foxconn??

Once again, yes I agree. Nobody can predict which strategy is the best to beat the iPhone, so what best to do is to shake up the tree so the ripen bad fruits fall and replaced with new fresh fruits, and that's what Microsoft is trying to do right now. Will it work? Who knows, maybe yes maybe not. But I guess that's what giant companies do when things don't go the way they wanted it to be.. \

Thanks for the post Stevie, that's a lot to talk about..
post #55 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Great companies produce; mediocre companies reorganize.

... you're right and then there's Google, producing mediocrity through organized.... ahh i got nothing.. .

Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post

OMG!!!
Microsoft even copied Jonathan Ive!

J Allard.

OMG!
post #56 of 80
I'm just surprised the Courier was something that could have potentially come to market. I figured it was pure vapor from the get go, to distract from the iPad. Or maybe nobody told Allard that.
post #57 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kilimanjaro View Post

Oh and by the way, are you sure Google doesn't make phone? Is Nexus not Google's? Yeah Nexus is made by HTC, not directly made by Google. But how does it not different from Apple who outsourced the making of iPhone to Foxconn??

That depends on who designed the hardware. Apple outsources manufacturing but the design of the product is 100% Apple, so who assembles the product is irrelevant. Did Google do the same with the Nexus? (Just asking, I really don't know.)

As for Microsoft "dying" I think it's obvious that this not happening and that using extreme terms to describe where they are or are going is problematical. Microsoft is still a cash machine. They could do nothing else but supply Windows to OEMs and sell productivity apps and make money into the foreseeable future. But as Bill Joy said in the interview posted here today, Microsoft is lacking in passion and commitment to do anything else -- and this is one of the principal ways they differ from Apple. If this trend continues, it will lead to a gradual but steady erosion of Microsoft's relevance, not to mention, their profitability.

It was not just a joke to say that great companies deliver and mediocre companies reorganize. Deciding that a company's problems are organizational and not a function of what they deliver to customers is classic boneheaded management thinking.
Please don't be insane.
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post #58 of 80
Microsoft may not be dying, but they'll soon occupy the position being held by the likes of Yahoo and the sort. Apple will one day leap frog them in every aspect, possibly the enterprise, even though that may not happen for another 20+ years.
post #59 of 80
Balmer heading the entertainment division? This is delightful news, now Balmer can make his tasteless harebrained schemes a reality!

GAMES DIVISION TO-DO LIST
  • Game mash-up Nascar vs. Professional Wrestling.
  • A wii-mote like device embedded in your bellybutton called project navel.
  • A Halo gun controller that doubles as a super-soaker so you can really squirt your friends.
  • A CEO simulator in which you control a multi-billion dollar company through incompetence.
MOBILE DIVISION TO-DO LIST
  • A premium phone that costs $600.
  • A whole new functional category called bathroom mode.
  • A tablet that touches you! This pairs well with the bathroom mode.
  • A hands-free phone that pierces your ear and makes you look like a pirate.
post #60 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobborries View Post

Balmer heading the entertainment division? This is delightful news, now Balmer can make his tasteless harebrained schemes a reality!

GAMES DIVISION TO-DO LIST
  • Game mash-up Nascar vs. Professional Wrestling.
  • A wii-mote like device embedded in your bellybutton called project navel.
  • A Halo gun controller that doubles as a super-soaker so you can really squirt your friends.
  • A CEO simulator in which you control a multi-billion dollar company through incompetence.
MOBILE DIVISION TO-DO LIST
  • A premium phone that costs $600.
  • A whole new functional category called bathroom mode.
  • A tablet that touches you! This pairs well with the bathroom mode.
  • A hands-free phone that pierces your ear and makes you look like a pirate.

LOL

Don't forget a music player that ejaculates songs... oh, wait!

.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #61 of 80
I agree with you. Comparing todays mobile device market to the desktop market from the past is complete fallacy. What happened in the past are because of the conditions and circumstances of the time. What is happening today are under entirely different conditions and circumstances.

Apple and Microsoft are very different companies today than they were 15 years ago. The technological landscape is completely different today than it was 15 years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Overall, I think that what we are looking at with iPhone and the iPad is an entirely new platform taking shape. To me, that makes a lot of your analysis wrong-headed to the degree that it's based on past trends.

The comparisons being made by analysts today to market share arguments from the desktop years may be quite misleading. At least for the time being, the traditionally Apple-owned "premium" segment of this market is actually the main segment. No one is going to make much money right now pushing "good enough" technology in the mobile market IMO. They are just filling up customers pockets until those customers eventually and inevitably buy their iPhones at some point down the road.
post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

... Cases and accessories - The iPhone has everybody beat, but the Nexus One has better docks.

Dock shmock. The iPhone has better sales numbers.

Oh, and have you tried buying a Nexus One online lately? IIRC they gave up and are now selling through their carrier.

The Android market is fragmented. There are many 1.x and 2.x versions out there on shipping products, and it's a difficult or impossible for users to upgrade the OS. (Of course, this is what the manufacturers want: better for them if you just buy a new phone.) Even worse, developers are facing a nightmare matrix of hardware and software versions.

Potential Android customers are also seeing a new, improved Android phone every month, from a different manufacturer. So they're afraid to pull the trigger for fear of buying a model that will be obsolete in a month. And all this talk of Android 2.2 can only suppress sales of the 1.x and 2.x models. "Wait and see."

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

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post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post

OMG!!!
Microsoft even copied Jonathan Ive!

J Allard.

OMG - this guy looks absolutely catatonic, vacant eyes, even his head is lolling to one side. It looks like he commutes to/from Humboldt County CA. Must be that Acapulco Gold is frying his brain.
post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

As for Microsoft "dying" I think it's obvious that this not happening and that using extreme terms to describe where they are or are going is problematical. Microsoft is still a cash machine. They could do nothing else but supply Windows to OEMs and sell productivity apps and make money into the foreseeable future.

That's Microsoft's ultimate fate. Microsoft will never die. They'll just keep on milking their corporate customers. The same way companies like Burroughs and NCR and Sperry-Univac also milked their dwindling customer base for as long as they could.

Microsoft isn't really in the software business. They're in the Windows business. They sell Windows licenses to PC makers and Office licenses to corporate IT departments. For their employees, who have no alternative, to run on Windows PCs.

But that focus on Windows means Microsoft has no future in consumer electronics. Their approach to consumer electronics has been to wedge Windows into smaller devices. Didn't work. The public wasn't fooled and Ballmer is finally realizing that. More importantly, investors weren't fooled either. That's why Microsoft stock has stayed flat for many years.

So, Windows (there's that word again) Phone 7 will be released in late 2010. That's 3.5 years after iPhone was actually released. Years after the (drastically fragmented yet popular) Android clones were released. Didn't Microsoft learn anything from the Danger acquisition? Or was that just to get rid of a competitor?

All this reorganization (and probably much Ballmer chair-throwing) is just to make investors think that Microsoft is actually doing something new. To keep investors from bailing en masse. Do you really think Ballmer has a better long-term plan for MS than Steve Jobs has for Apple? I don't.

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post #65 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

That's Microsoft's ultimate fate. Microsoft will never die. They'll just keep on milking their corporate customers. The same way companies like Burroughs and NCR and Sperry-Univac also milked their dwindling customer base for as long as they could.

Microsoft isn't really in the software business. They're in the Windows business. They sell Windows licenses to PC makers and Office licenses to corporate IT departments. For their employees, who have no alternative, to run on Windows PCs.

But that focus on Windows means Microsoft has no future in consumer electronics. Their approach to consumer electronics has been to wedge Windows into smaller devices. Didn't work. The public wasn't fooled and Ballmer is finally realizing that. More importantly, investors weren't fooled either. That's why Microsoft stock has stayed flat for many years.

So, Windows (there's that word again) Phone 7 will be released in late 2010. That's 3.5 years after iPhone was actually released. Years after the (drastically fragmented yet popular) Android clones were released. Didn't Microsoft learn anything from the Danger acquisition? Or was that just to get rid of a competitor?

All this reorganization (and probably much Ballmer chair-throwing) is just to make investors think that Microsoft is actually doing something new. To keep investors from bailing en masse. Do you really think Ballmer has a better long-term plan for MS than Steve Jobs has for Apple? I don't.

Good response, Let it be noted that Apple is actually churning out successful products one right after the other, their market cap and revenue stream is physical evidence to that. What is Ballmer doing? still running that photocopier.
post #66 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by zindako View Post

Good response, Let it be noted that Apple is actually churning out successful products one right after the other, their market cap and revenue stream is physical evidence to that. What is Ballmer doing? still running that photocopier.

I wouldn't mind it so much about the photocopier thing if the actually kicked out a good product now and then. Possible exception of x-box elite.

Windows Phone 7. Even if, and I do stress if, it is a decent product it sill has one of the lamest names ever. I have heard that some of today's kids are getting a little blasé about the Apple brand. Well can you guess what they think about this? Windows phone 7? No way thats like the phone my grandpa would buy.
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post #67 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

..... J Allard, chief experience officer and chief .....

Where do these guys come up with these titles!?

(Have you noticed that Apple, fwiw, doesn't have Chief Evangelists, Chief Bloggers, Chief Experience Officers, Chief Yahoos, etc).
post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

All this reorganization (and probably much Ballmer chair-throwing) is just to make investors think that Microsoft is actually doing something new. To keep investors from bailing en masse. Do you really think Ballmer has a better long-term plan for MS than Steve Jobs has for Apple? I don't.

Does anyone think so at this point? I sure don't. The plan seems to be, move some boxes around on the org chart and hope magic results. Some MBA got paid big bucks to come up with that idea, and they probably put themselves in a higher box too.

I hadn't thought about Sperry Univac (later Sperry Rand) for years, so I looked it up. Turns out the company lives on (if only barely) as part of Unisys. Not that I think Microsoft is anywhere close to being merged out of existence. I suppose a better analogy would be GM in the 1970s. Similarly, Microsoft could go on for another 30-40 years on inertia alone, before it becomes apparent to everybody that they're but a shell of their former selves.
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post #69 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

My kid's friend has a Zune. It is pretty slick.

So is an oil spill......
post #70 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

So is an oil spill......

And a shyster lawyer.
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post #71 of 80
I'm a big fan of the Xbox 360. Despite its initial teething problems, it's a great system and has plenty of features that its competitors (including Apple) have copied. J Allard was at the centre of its creation so firing him seems from the outside to be a very, very dumb move.

When are the MSFT shareholders going to realize that the problem is at the very top? Microsoft needs to get rid of Ballmer if it wants to improve its image.
post #72 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

That's Microsoft's ultimate fate. Microsoft will never die. They'll just keep on milking their corporate customers. The same way companies like Burroughs and NCR and Sperry-Univac also milked their dwindling customer base for as long as they could.

Microsoft isn't really in the software business. They're in the Windows business. They sell Windows licenses to PC makers and Office licenses to corporate IT departments. For their employees, who have no alternative, to run on Windows PCs.

But that focus on Windows means Microsoft has no future in consumer electronics. Their approach to consumer electronics has been to wedge Windows into smaller devices. Didn't work. The public wasn't fooled and Ballmer is finally realizing that. More importantly, investors weren't fooled either. That's why Microsoft stock has stayed flat for many years.

So, Windows (there's that word again) Phone 7 will be released in late 2010. That's 3.5 years after iPhone was actually released. Years after the (drastically fragmented yet popular) Android clones were released. Didn't Microsoft learn anything from the Danger acquisition? Or was that just to get rid of a competitor?

All this reorganization (and probably much Ballmer chair-throwing) is just to make investors think that Microsoft is actually doing something new. To keep investors from bailing en masse. Do you really think Ballmer has a better long-term plan for MS than Steve Jobs has for Apple? I don't.

Yeah-- Ballmer is set to announce Mobile WOffice 0.92 Public beta... It'll be Wawful

.
"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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"...The calm is on the water and part of us would linger by the shore, For ships are safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for."
- Michael Lille -
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post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by doyourownthing View Post

i think google may have bought all of them

Haha, good one.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #74 of 80
Apple's success in __________ forces Microsoft to shake up its _________ team.

Nothing new there.
post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

I see the iPhone having a small, but profitable market share - maybe 15 or 20 percent.

I think you are off by at least half.

Quote:
I think that WinPhone7 will immediately sell zillions of copies to enterprise users

Not my enterprise. All of our C level execs are clamoring for the iPhone and we have multiple groups that were writing applications for the iPhone that are just falling over themselves with the iPad. Once OS 4 with the remote provisioning hits, it's game over. Its not just about the phone anymore. It's the platform, and no one has a better story to tell than Apple. Management of android is a joke, an OS 4 will leave it in the dust.

Quote:
I think that Android will continue to grow FAST, and will take a huge market share. Probably the biggest. Probably dominating.

Probably. But market share does not denote success. If you look at the stats, android still doesn't generate the web traffic the iPhone does. Android will be popular with handset makers and carriers because of it's cost, but serious work and serious profit will be in the iPhone ecosystem.

Apple neither needs nor desires total market domination, they just want the cream. And just like with the Mac and the iPod, they are getting it in the mobile space as well.

Quote:
Nokia is stepping up to the plate - I would expect that they will gain market share here in the US. Even their old OS is outselling everyone else worldwide by a huge margin, and this installed base is prime selling territory.

But they aren't nearly as profitable.

Have fun focusing on sales volume. Next you'll be trying to convince us that net books are really successful for the vendors that sell millions of them...
post #76 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilogic View Post

I would like to take a guess at the number one factor that caused this:

The iPad. The latest sales figures is spooking the he77 out of them, and they know that they can't waste another moment trying to figure out how they're going to compete for the long haul. The tossing out of Windows 7 out of the HP Slate, the Courier scrapped no doubt because it lacked a serious component inside Apple's devices. We're not even talking about iPhone 4 and so MS now has to go back to the drawing board. For real this time.

That is a bit illogical.

Courier was supposed to run on Windows Phone 7 OS, which is not scrapped.

Additionally, I believe MS did not say Courier is terminated, just postponed. iPad might be reason for that, but not in a way you think; after realising that iPad is just oversized iPod Touch, MS decided Courier concept is too radical and decided first to go out with simple single screen tablet based on WP7.

HP Slate was supposed to run on Windows 7 for desktops, not Windows 7 for phones. Completely different platform. It is no surprise HP wants to use their own (freshly purchased) IP rather than MS product, not to mention that desktop Windows 7 is too heavy code for lightweight tablet.

Scrapping of W7 slate and Courier have nothing in common. I'm sure we will see tablet(s) based on Windows Phone 7 soon after OS introduction.
post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

That depends on who designed the hardware. Apple outsources manufacturing but the design of the product is 100% Apple, so who assembles the product is irrelevant. Did Google do the same with the Nexus? (Just asking, I really don't know.)

Yes, Nexus One is Google's.

Nexus One is made by HTC, and Google was working tightly with the Taiwan-based manufacturer to design and create it. Nexus One was at first offered through Google's very own web page, not HTC's web page. The branding name you can find on the Nexus One is Google only, not HTC. And the warranty is stating Google, not HTC.

So it obvious that Nexus One is Google's, hence come the conclusion: Google does make phone.. Umm, do I put it right?
post #78 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kilimanjaro View Post

Yes, Nexus One is Google's.

Nexus One is made by HTC, and Google was working tightly with the Taiwan-based manufacturer to design and create it. Nexus One was at first offered through Google's very own web page, not HTC's web page. The branding name you can find on the Nexus One is Google only, not HTC. And the warranty is stating Google, not HTC.

So it obvious that Nexus One is Google's, hence come the conclusion: Google does make phone.. Umm, do I put it right?

Not sure. The brand name on the phone, or how it is sold, doesn't mean anything to me. I am wondering who actually designed it. If it was a collaboration between Google and HTC then this is very unlike Apple, which designs the entire product and then finds one or more manufacturers to assemble it.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #79 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

Not sure. The brand name on the phone, or how it is sold, doesn't mean anything to me. I am wondering who actually designed it. If it was a collaboration between Google and HTC then this is very unlike Apple, which designs the entire product and then finds one or more manufacturers to assemble it.

Duuh..

I was talking about Google makes phone, and it's obvious Google is all over the phone.
Whether or not Google entirely design the whole phone, Google own the phone and claim it as its phone. That's it..
We'll never know how much influence Google put into the Nexus One, or perhaps HTC designed the whole phone by itself, but one thing for sure is people will see it as Google's phone.

It is very unlike Apple, because Google was not trying to cover it up, but still no more details can be found about the collaboration.
Perhaps someday in the future, Google will spill all the beans behind the making of Nexus One and even post a YouTube video about it, or maybe someone unhappy at HTC finally leak the process, then we'll know.
post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by kilimanjaro View Post

Duuh..

I was talking about Google makes phone, and it's obvious Google is all over the phone.
Whether or not Google entirely design the whole phone, Google own the phone and claim it as its phone. That's it..
We'll never know how much influence Google put into the Nexus One, or perhaps HTC designed the whole phone by itself, but one thing for sure is people will see it as Google's phone.

It is very unlike Apple, because Google was not trying to cover it up, but still no more details can be found about the collaboration.
Perhaps someday in the future, Google will spill all the beans behind the making of Nexus One and even post a YouTube video about it, or maybe someone unhappy at HTC finally leak the process, then we'll know.

Maybe we don't know, but that doesn't make it a ridiculous question, not by any means. It's of great interest to some of us whether Google really has the expertise in-house to design consumer products, or whether they have to rely on their suppliers for it for most, some, or part of it. Maybe you don't see the difference, but I do.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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