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Apple iPhone Web marketshare outgrows Google Android in May

post #1 of 61
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Despite a larger variety of devices running the Google Android operating system available on the market, Apple's iPhone operating system still outgained its rival in terms of Web presence in the month of May.

New statistics released this week by Net Applications show that Apple increased its mobile browser share from 30.3 percent a month prior to 32.8 percent in May. During the same time, Android also grew, but by a smaller amount -- from 5.3 percent to 6.2 percent.

"Google's operating system, Android is rapidly gaining usage share. However, the iPhone still maintains a large lead," the report said.

The top platform remains Java Micro Edition, which is found in use on a variety of older smartphones. However, it is rapidly losing share to both the iPhone and Android.

Apple's next closest competitor is Symbian, which had a 13.98 percent share in May. During the same period, BlackBerry accounted for 3.59 percent of mobile Web browsing, while Windows Mobile took 2.97 percent. While many competitors have remained static or shrunk, monthly tracking data from Net Applications has shown steady growth for the iPhone over some time.



The firm also tracked a spike in iPad usage over the weekend, after the device launched internationally in nine new countries. Last Friday, Apple's new multitouch device went on sale in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

Net Applications found that iPad usage jumped from an 0.08 percent total Web presence on May 27 to 0.12 percent on Friday, May 28. The numbers crept higher over the weekend, with the iPad representing 0.17 percent on Saturday, May 29, and dipping slightly to 0.16 percent on Sunday.



Saturday's total of 0.17 percent represented the highest single day of Web use of the iPad yet, according to Net Applications. The company began tracking the online presence of its device soon after it launched, and found that it quickly began to rival the Android and BlackBerry mobile platforms.
post #2 of 61
I didn't know Java Micro edition was a browser. I learned something new today.
post #3 of 61
good news
post #4 of 61
This even with new iPhone about to come out is pretty impressive.
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post #5 of 61
Quote:
New statistics released this week by Net Applications show that Apple increased its mobile browser share from 30.3 percent a month prior to 32.8 percent in May. During the same time, Android also grew, but by a smaller amount -- from 5.3 percent to 6.2 percent.

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

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post #6 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

Depends on how you look at them. The article showed absolute figures, so in absolute, Android grew less than iPhone, relative to themselves, as you pointed out, Android was faster.

It's funny to see that you can put nearly anything into a statistic, you just have to chose your angle from which you see them.
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post #7 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

As stated ad nasueum every fraking time there is a mention of percentages it's relative to the subject. In this case they are comparing growth of the entire mobile web browser market (which makes sense), not measuring the isolated and irrelevant percentages of Android x to Android y, and iPhone x to iPhone y.

Read what you quoted. It's 2.5% increase v. 0.8% increase, so the iPhone is growing faster.
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post #8 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

I didn't know Java Micro edition was a browser. I learned something new today.

The story is about platform share. Not browser share.
post #9 of 61
Anyway you look at it Apple is riding a wave!
post #10 of 61
But the iPhone doesn't have Flash and everyone want Flash!!

Sorry.. couldn't resist.
post #11 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Despite a larger variety of devices running the Google Android operating system available on the market, Apple's iPhone operating system still outgained its rival in terms of Web presence in the month of May. ...

Reading this on an iPad right now in a coffee shop ...

I'm sure the iPad has just added to these statistics.
post #12 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

I've always thought the measures relative to themselves are rather pointless from a competitor's point of view when it is the piece of the pie that is important. If my goal was to grow the fastest, it would be relatively easy to keep a 200% growth rate going for about ten months if I started with one sold the first month. In total, I'd only have to sell about 30,000 units, but no other company is going to be worried about that device.

Now, from an investor's point of view, how fast the market is growing for a specific device relative to itself is vitally important as that is directly related to how much money the company is making. In my above example, I would love to invest in a company that had 200% growth, even if they only sold 30K units in a year.

Statistics don't lie, but a lot of the details often get left out that allows the writers a lot of latitude in how they explain them.
post #13 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

Yes, some understanding is needed. You must look at what percentage of the POTENTIAL market each OS was able to capture. For example something with 98% market share can at best only increase its share by 2 more points. If it increased its share by just 1 absolute point to 99%, it would have taken 50% of its potential market, which would be exceptional!

Likewise, with initially 30.3% of the market, iPhone's potential market is the other 69.7%. It decreased this by 2.5 absolute points, which is a 3.6% decrease is its potential market (2.5 / 69.7 x 100).

On the other hand, Android's initial share at 5.3% leaves 94.7% of the market available (long way to go, but large potential). This decreased by 0.9 absolute points, which represents just under a 1% decrease in its potential market.

I would say that iPhone is doing over 3.5 times better than Android at attacting new customers. How you like them apples?
post #14 of 61
This is not surprising because the people i know who have an iPhone and want to get on the web just do it right then and their. The people i know who have blackberry's and android's put their phones in their pockets and fire up their laptops, or walk into the other room where the desktop is located. It's all about user interface design and apple get's this. Android may get it with the next iteration. That is a wait and see thing.
post #15 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by willychu View Post

Yes, some understanding is needed. You must look at what percentage of the POTENTIAL market each OS was able to capture. For example something with 98% market share can at best only increase its share by 2 more points. If it increased its share by just 1 absolute point to 99%, it would have taken 50% of its potential market, which would be exceptional!

Likewise, with initially 30.3% of the market, iPhone's potential market is the other 69.7%. It decreased this by 2.5 absolute points, which is a 3.6% decrease is its potential market (2.5 / 69.7 x 100).

On the other hand, Android's initial share at 5.3% leaves 94.7% of the market available (long way to go, but large potential). This decreased by 0.9 absolute points, which represents just under a 1% decrease in its potential market.

I would say that iPhone is doing over 3.5 times better than Android at attacting new customers. How you like them apples?

Well said. Identifying the correct metrics for an analysis is extremely important.
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post #16 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by shubidua View Post

It's funny to see that you can put nearly anything into a statistic, you just have to chose your angle from which you see them.

Mark Twain once credited Benjamin Disraeli with saying,

"There are three kinds of lies: Lies, damned lies, and statistics."



Edit: I think willychu is likely using the most sensible approach to understanding market growth.
post #17 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

As stated ad nasueum every fraking time there is a mention of percentages it's relative to the subject. In this case they are comparing growth of the entire mobile web browser market (which makes sense), not measuring the isolated and irrelevant percentages of Android x to Android y, and iPhone x to iPhone y.

Read what you quoted. It's 2.5% increase v. 0.8% increase, so the iPhone is growing faster.

I'm sorry, but that is simply not how you measure or discuss percentages. You do not say a 1.5% increase to represent an increase from 5% to 6.5%... that is nonsense, not to mention meaningless.

In this article it's especially pertinent because the article implies Android is growing at a slower rate (although it's very careful to use the ambiguous words 'smaller amount').

I understand the whole point of this site is to put Apple in the best possible light, rather than report anything objectively, and that's fine. However, trying to convince me that this is how percentages work is a little insulting.

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post #18 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

Agreed. Also, if you look at how long the iPhone has been on the market starting from the 1st generation iPhone in comparison with Android then there is reason to worry. Android is gaining momentum fast and it's just a matter of time before they outnumber the iPhone.
I hope Apple starts thinking seriously about
1) having Verizon as a carrier (or multiple carriers)
2) offering more models

As much as I like my iPhone, there is a lot to like in the new version of Android, Froyo.
Google took so many ideas from Apple, there is nothing wrong in Apple doing the same. There are some nice features on Android that I wanna see on my iPhone. Open up the SDK even more plz
post #19 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Reading this on an iPad right now in a coffee shop ...

Hopefully, we will now achieve world peace, now that the Canadians and Euros and Japanese are able to prance about with their iPads, like the Americans before them.
post #20 of 61
edit: Replying to trolls does no one any good.
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post #21 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Hopefully, we will now achieve world peace, now that the Canadians and Euros and Japanese are able to prance about with their iPads, like the Americans before them.

I'm pretty sure World Peace isn't scheduled until the 3.0 iPad.

This one is a bit too heavy, and the bezels are a still bit too wide.
post #22 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

I'm sorry, but that is simply not how you measure or discuss percentages. You do not say a 1.5% increase to represent an increase from 5% to 6.5%... that is nonsense, not to mention meaningless.

In this article it's esepcailly pertinent because the article implies Android is growing at a slower rate (although it's very careful to use the ambiguous words 'smaller amount').

I understand the whole point of this site is to put Apple int he best possible light, rather than report anythign objectively, and that's fine. However, trying to convince me that this is how percentages work is a little insulting. I do this for a living.


following that comment as well. In athletic prowess, besting your last best time is an accomplishment much to be desired and a way to measure how well you are doing relative to your starting point. This is not in dispute. But when you are racing against other individuals, your personal best is only relevant (in terms of the present race) to the personal best of the others in the race. So even though you bested your personal best time - you can still come in dead last in the race, if your personal best was well below the other competitors. Likewise, you can have the world's best sprinter in a race, but if it is a marathon, the sprinter is not likely to win against seasoned marathoners, no matter how fast he posts his 100 yards. It is the remaining 10,836.132 yards that are truly relevant to winning the race. As has been posted following the post to which you responded - it is only absolute numbers, not growth percentage that tell the correct story.

Quote:
I do this for a living.

Errrr, what?(insert "...for a living" after each example) You write articles about Apple and Android products? You do marketing? You use statistics badly? You don't understand how percentages work? You try to convince yourself this is how percentages work? You insult yourself?

A very badly ambiguous trailing statement there zooey.

post #23 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I'm pretty sure World Peace isn't scheduled until the 3.0 iPad.

Along with the next AppleTV HW update

Quote:
This one is a bit too heavy, and the bezels are a still bit too wide.

I disagree regarding the iPad weight. I think iPad is not as heavy as many people have been saying. Many books weight as much as the iPad, if not more (150 Letter size pages weight that much too). Personally, each of the engineering books I have weight more than that.

You need the wide bezels. How else would you hold it without touching the screen?!
post #24 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

edit: Replying to trolls does no one any good.

it does give me a bit of a giggle.

post #25 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

Would you rather that they base stories upon lies? Damn lies, maybe?

But to be serious, they aren't misrepresenting anything so much as picking upon statistical anomalies and presenting them in their best light.

It's a matter of what statistics you look at, and how much importance you attach to them.

There's also the "ten times nutthin is still nuthin" rule to be considered.

And none of this establishes any trends, which are more important than the static snapshots under consideration.
post #26 of 61
iPhone + iPod touch + iPad Grew faster than Android....
post #27 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by willychu View Post

Yes, some understanding is needed. You must look at what percentage of the POTENTIAL market each OS was able to capture. For example something with 98% market share can at best only increase its share by 2 more points. If it increased its share by just 1 absolute point to 99%, it would have taken 50% of its potential market, which would be exceptional!

Likewise, with initially 30.3% of the market, iPhone's potential market is the other 69.7%. It decreased this by 2.5 absolute points, which is a 3.6% decrease is its potential market (2.5 / 69.7 x 100).

On the other hand, Android's initial share at 5.3% leaves 94.7% of the market available (long way to go, but large potential). This decreased by 0.9 absolute points, which represents just under a 1% decrease in its potential market.

I would say that iPhone is doing over 3.5 times better than Android at attacting new customers. How you like them apples?



That is extremely interesting. Is that a standard way to look at these things?
post #28 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by ekeefe41 View Post

iPhone + iPod touch + iPad Grew faster than Android....

if you read the article it clearly states that there are more devices running android available than the iPhone OS
post #29 of 61
Android users must spend most of their time micro-managing their task managers and customizing their phones.
post #30 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

I'm sorry, but that is simply not how you measure or discuss percentages. You do not say a 1.5% increase to represent an increase from 5% to 6.5%... that is nonsense, not to mention meaningless.

In this article it's especially pertinent because the article implies Android is growing at a slower rate (although it's very careful to use the ambiguous words 'smaller amount').

I understand the whole point of this site is to put Apple in the best possible light, rather than report anything objectively, and that's fine. However, trying to convince me that this is how percentages work is a little insulting.

I'm sorry but objectively it is far more relevant to know that Apple is increasing it's share faster than Android.

Android could increase 10 fold from 0.1 to 1 point for example but if Apple, regardless of where it started from, moved up by 2 points, would still have taken double the points of Android.

You would be shouting on the rooftops that Android increased ten times but it would not really mean anything in relation to Apple's increase. I would find that far more insulting.
post #31 of 61
I'm not surprised by this, and I'm also not surprised by the news that Android phones are outselling iPhones. Here's why. People who buy Android phones fall into one of two categories: people who know what they're getting and people who just want a "fancy phone".

I have a coworker who can't even send a text message, yet she and her husband both bought very cool Android phones (a Droid and an Incredible, I think). Their reason was that they wanted cooler phones than their throwaway flip phones, not that they had any specific desire for those particular phones.

Compared with the people I know who have iPhones, I get the sense that iPhone buyers tend to know what they're getting and use their phones more than Android buyers. I think iPhone usage is higher than Android usage, even though people may buy more Android phones.
post #32 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by masternav View Post


Errrr, what?(insert "...for a living" after each example) You write articles about Apple and Android products? You do marketing? You use statistics badly? You don't understand how percentages work? You try to convince yourself this is how percentages work? You insult yourself?

A very badly ambiguous trailing statement there zooey.


Fair enough, I edited the comment pretty quickly to remoe that but you caught the quote anyway. I work for an investment bank developing and defining strategic reporting on KPIs, KRIs etc - basically key operational metrics. If I made a statement in a report summary that capital leverage was up 10% (meaning from 10% to 20% of tier one capital) I'd be fired on the spot, and I'm quite senior.

While people can have a nice philosophical debate about statistics and lies, when someone says X increased by 10%, it's understood to mean by 10% of the original value, not by 10 percentage points. Anyone who attended at least high school knows this, and the argument is more of outcome than principle.

Note that the headline of this article is that "iPhone Web Market Share Outgrows Android in May"

The key word there is "outgrows", which means to grow faster or a greater rate. That is not backed by the figures, and the body of the story also adapts to reflect the figures, rather than support the headline.

I know AI is not exactly the NY Times, but that's not the point.

Quote:
Originally Posted by macnyc View Post

I'm sorry but objectively it is far more relevant to know that Apple is increasing it's share faster than Android.

Saying something is objectively more relevant than something else, without a qualifier, is pointless. Relevant to who, for what purpose? To you maybe, to AI readers possibly. You may be right.

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post #33 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post

if you read the article it clearly states that there are more devices running android available than the iPhone OS

In terms of # of models, of course. But they're all smartphones (right now).

iPhone OS is on iPod Touches, iPhones, and iPads. It is on a wider variety of devices with a wider variety of users and a wider variety of price points.
post #34 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

I'm sorry, but that is simply not how you measure or discuss percentages. You do not say a 1.5% increase to represent an increase from 5% to 6.5%... that is nonsense, not to mention meaningless.

In this article it's especially pertinent because the article implies Android is growing at a slower rate (although it's very careful to use the ambiguous words 'smaller amount').

I understand the whole point of this site is to put Apple in the best possible light, rather than report anything objectively, and that's fine. However, trying to convince me that this is how percentages work is a little insulting.

If you do this for a living, I'd suggest that you find a new career.

Percentages don't mean anything by themselves. Any time you see a percentage, you have to ask, "percent of WHAT?". Simply saying that something grew by 10% means nothing. If you say that it grew by 10% of its previous sales, that is meaningful. If you say that it's share of the market grew by 10%, that is also meaningful.

There's nothing wrong with your way of doing it (measuring percent sales growth), but there's also nothing wrong with saying that Apple's market share increased by 2.5%, either (that is, 2.5% OF THE TOTAL MARKET).

It is 100% accurate to say that Apple gained more of the available market than Android (assuming, of course, that the figures provided are accurate). Whether Apple's gain was BETTER or WORSE than Android's gain is a matter of judgment.

Still, I'd be inclined to say that with a much smaller available market, Apple's ability to gain 3 times as many new users as Android is good news for Apple. Android's ability to increase their share significantly is good news for them, as well. I don't see any way of saying which one is 'better' news.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

I'm pretty sure World Peace isn't scheduled until the 3.0 iPad.

This one is a bit too heavy, and the bezels are a still bit too wide.

And it doesn't have Flash.
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post #35 of 61
Love the iPad graph: no y-axis scale or label!
post #36 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Fair enough, I edited the comment pretty quickly to remoe that but you caught the quote anyway. I work for an investment bank developing and defining strategic reporting on KPIs, KRIs etc - basically key operational metrics. If I made a statement in a report summary that capital leverage was up 10% (meaning from 10% to 20% of tier one capital) I'd be fired on the spot, and I'm quite senior. ...

This may explain a lot...
post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by replicant View Post

Agreed. Also, if you look at how long the iPhone has been on the market starting from the 1st generation iPhone in comparison with Android then there is reason to worry. Android is gaining momentum fast and it's just a matter of time before they outnumber the iPhone.
I hope Apple starts thinking seriously about
1) having Verizon as a carrier (or multiple carriers)
2) offering more models

As much as I like my iPhone, there is a lot to like in the new version of Android, Froyo.
Google took so many ideas from Apple, there is nothing wrong in Apple doing the same. There are some nice features on Android that I wanna see on my iPhone. Open up the SDK even more plz

Aw Jeez, another Steve Jobs wannabe.
post #38 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoolook View Post

Android grew by 16.9% and iPhone by 8.25%, so Android is growing faster. If you're going to base stories on statistics, you need to understand them in the first place.

The entertaining part of this story is how starkly it contrasts with the triumphalism of many Android partisans (ie people who prefer the approach and goals of Android). You would think the iPhone platform was already eclipsed by Android and declining. It may some day but Apple stockholders have to be happy with the way things look currently.
post #39 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by replicant View Post

Agreed. Also, if you look at how long the iPhone has been on the market starting from the 1st generation iPhone in comparison with Android then there is reason to worry. Android is gaining momentum fast and it's just a matter of time before they outnumber the iPhone.

Bzzt. Wrong. You're either assuming iPhone is standing still or that Android can continue growing at the same rate. Let's use the NetApplications statistics to gain a dose of reality - starting each platform from its launch date:

Android device launch - Oct 22, 2008; we'll say Nov 2008. 19 months later in May 2010, NetApps reports 0.11% web share for Android platform.

iPhone launch - June 29, 2007; we'll say July 2007. 19 months later in Jan 2009, NetApps reports 0.20% web share for iPhone platform.

For every month from launch to 19 months later (for Android that was May 2010, for iPhone that was Jan 2009), iPhone outperformed Android in the NetApps metrics; pretty much close to doubling the Android results every time.

As I've said before, Android is growing well. But it hasn't done anything in terms of market share growth, web share growth, units sold, or apps count, that iPhone hasn't already done before. Android is like the younger sibling who can't even duplicate the marks of its record-setting older sibling, iPhone.

Most Android-fans think they're seeing something incredible in the Android growth rate, and it is pretty incredible. What they don't realize is how much greater and more incredible was the iPhone growth rate that came before it.

Added: There is a device that is blowing the iPhone growth rate out of the water. That would be ... iPad.
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post #40 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quevar View Post


Statistics don't lie, but a lot of the details often get left out that allows the writers a lot of latitude in how they explain them.

How true. That explains one of my favorite sayings (author unknown) : Figures lie and liars figure.
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