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Cisco licenses iOS name to Apple, screenshot shows iWork on iPhone

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Before Apple announced its newly renamed iOS, the company came to an agreement with the owner of the trademark, Cisco. Also, a screenshot temporarily shown on Apple's website suggested Keynote, part of the iWork suite, could be coming to the iPhone.

Cisco, Apple agree on iOS trademark

On its website Monday, Cisco revealed that it has agreed to license the use of the iOS name to Apple for its mobile operating system on the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Cisco owns the trademark for IOS, its core operating system used for nearly two decades.

"The license is for use of the trademark only and not for any technology," Cisco noted.

The company said that Cisco IOS software is the most widely leveraged network infrastructure software in the world, and is currently found on millions of active systems.

The prior agreement is different from 2007, when Apple introduced the iPhone -- a trademark that was also owned by Cisco. Following Apple's iPhone announcement, Cisco sued, alleging infringement.

A month later, the two companies reached a settlement that allowed both companies to use the iPhone trademark on their products throughout the world.

Apple also did not own the name iPad earlier this year, when its new multitouch device was introduced. Fujitsu released the first product to carry that name in 2002. Days before Apple's iPad was announced, the Cupertino, Calif., company acquired the trademark from Fujitsu.

Keynote, iWork could come to iPhone

Apple on Monday had a screenshot on its website showing the option to open an e-mail attachment on the iPhone in Keynote. Currently, the only iOS version of Keynote available is on the iPad, along with Pages and Numbers, rounding out the iWork suite.



The screenshot was quickly grabbed by Pocket-lint before Apple pulled it down. The image was replaced with a screen that read "Open in 'iBooks'" instead of "Open in 'Keynote.'"

Since the trio of multitouch iWork applications were released for iPad, they have consistently been among the top selling software on the App Store. One projection suggested the iPad versions of the iWork suite will earn Apple $40 million a year.
post #2 of 19
well that answers that question
post #3 of 19
Being a network guy myself I really wondered about the iOS name as I already knew it belonged to Cisco. Glad to see this one won't be coming back to bite Apple in the behind in the future!
post #4 of 19
I doubt it. On iPhone's new tech specs page, it clearly says it can open files such as keynote, pages, numbers, jpg, gif, word, pdf, etc. It only means that it has viewers that can open these files; not that it will have keynote. The screenshot may have been produced on the iPad, since they have exactly the same OS, but the app is available there. I can't imagine a working productivity application on such a small screen.

Then again, who knows, it's Apple, after all. If anyone can build such an app, Apple can.
post #5 of 19
In case anyone is interested, here's a recent comparison of the new iPhone with like smartphones

http://fortunebrainstormtech.files.w...ng?w=600&h=804


I must say I'm impressed with the latest iPhone.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

On its website Monday, Cisco revealed that it has agreed to license the use of the iOS name to Apple for its mobile operating system on the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Cisco owns the trademark for IOS, its core operating system used for nearly two decades.

There's a little nugget gold there; Cisco call its IOS with big capital "I", while Apple call its iOS with teenie-weenie "i" letter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Before Apple announced its newly renamed iOS, the company came to an agreement with the owner of the trademark, Cisco.

That's a bit surprising, knowing how often Steve Jobs love to jump on trademarked names before his lawyers use all of their arsenals and tricks to get it for him.
Maybe both company already talked about this when Cisco sued Apple for the iPhone name trademark, and they have came up with the agreement not long after. If this true, that would mean Apple had been eyeing the name for quite some time..
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

... Keynote, iWork could come to iPhone.

Apple on Monday had a screenshot on its website showing the option to open an e-mail attachment on the iPhone in Keynote. Currently, the only iOS version of Keynote available is on the iPad, along with Pages and Numbers, rounding out the iWork suite. ...

While this *may* portend an iPhone version of iWork, it's pretty weak sauce considering the iPad runs on a fork of the same software. This doesn't really "prove" or even strongly imply anything.
post #8 of 19
The content of the email is talking about a presentation. Even though they could be referring to a PDF for the presentation that would open in iBooks, it's unlikely. This is just a bad coverup.
post #9 of 19
and I wonder if anyone there takes search engine results into consideration. Oh well.. I guess I'll just have to get used to typing -Apple
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thebiggestapple View Post

The content of the email is talking about a presentation. Even though they could be referring to a PDF for the presentation that would open in iBooks, it's unlikely. This is just a bad coverup.

So you open a keynote presentation in iBooks now? Bad coverup
post #11 of 19
Apple probably realizes that they have enough money to buy the trademarks they need. The owner of said trademarks probably feel the money provided is enough to compensate.
post #12 of 19
Why was the name even an issue in the first place. It seems extremely debatable that Apple using the name iOS would be in any way profitable. It's a relatively minor issue of consistency for developers; consumers don't care what it's called, they certainly won't make their buying decisions over it. What sort of damages could Cisco have sued over?
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Predrag View Post

I doubt it. On iPhone's new tech specs page, it clearly says it can open files such as keynote, pages, numbers, jpg, gif, word, pdf, etc. It only means that it has viewers that can open these files; not that it will have keynote. The screenshot may have been produced on the iPad, since they have exactly the same OS, but the app is available there. I can't imagine a working productivity application on such a small screen.

Then again, who knows, it's Apple, after all. If anyone can build such an app, Apple can.

Then you've never used Documents To Go. It's a fantastic app but I need iWork instead because that's what I use on my Mac.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod76 View Post

Being a network guy myself I really wondered about the iOS name as I already knew it belonged to Cisco. Glad to see this one won't be coming back to bite Apple in the behind in the future!

with mobile data shooting up to the sky, cisco would very much like to give this name, even free, to apple, who will mostly certainly buy tons of switches from cisco to build its data center. so it is a win-win.
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteRabbit View Post

Why was the name even an issue in the first place. It seems extremely debatable that Apple using the name iOS would be in any way profitable. It's a relatively minor issue of consistency for developers; consumers don't care what it's called, they certainly won't make their buying decisions over it. What sort of damages could Cisco have sued over?

With respect to damages, trademark dilution. Damage to the value of Cisco's own trademark.

Even with no damages, they can obtain a court order to stop Apple from using the trademark, and sometimes even to destroy all product with the trademark on it.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajmas View Post

Apple probably realizes that they have enough money to buy the trademarks they need. The owner of said trademarks probably feel the money provided is enough to compensate.

Or maybe even the entire company?
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amdahl View Post

With respect to damages, trademark dilution. Damage to the value of Cisco's own trademark.

Even with no damages, they can obtain a court order to stop Apple from using the trademark, and sometimes even to destroy all product with the trademark on it.

I do recall Steve Jobs taking back Mac Clone Licenses, so it's not without precedent, right? So here are some Qs:
  • What if Cisco wants their Trademarks back??? Can they take it back, or raise their Licensing Fees too high, so that Apple walks away and changes the Names, which seems unthinkable?!
  • Are the Trademark Holders, like Cisco in this case, required to renew such Trademark or any kind of Licenses?
  • Can Cisco sell iPhone and iOS Licenses to a higher bidder? I can't think of suchhigher bidder though..., cause that bidder would be obviously pulling a knife on Apple!

In short, there gotta be some iron clad rules for such deals that can't be based on handshakes alone, right?

Thanks in advance for any and all education on these Qs!

Go  Apple!!!

Reply

Go  Apple!!!

Reply
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by macologist View Post

I do recall Steve Jobs taking back Mac Clone Licenses, so it's not without precedent, right? So here are some Qs:
  • What if Cisco wants their Trademarks back??? Can they take it back, or raise their Licensing Fees too high, so that Apple walks away and changes the Names, which seems unthinkable?!
  • Are the Trademark Holders, like Cisco in this case, required to renew such Trademark or any kind of Licenses?
  • Can Cisco sell iPhone and iOS Licenses to a higher bidder? I can't think of suchhigher bidder though..., cause that bidder would be obviously pulling a knife on Apple!

In short, there gotta be some iron clad rules for such deals that can't be based on handshakes alone, right?

Thanks in advance for any and all education on these Qs!

I think you can assume that this is all considered in their licensing agreement. The agreement is likely secret, and part of the price Apple paid to Cisco is for favorable answers to your questions.

In other words, Apple is probably protected from Typical Apple Business Practices. \
post #19 of 19
iLike iOS better than iPhone OS.
http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

Never argue with idiots, they'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. - a bumper sticker

Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
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http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

Never argue with idiots, they'll bring you down to their level and beat you with experience. - a bumper sticker

Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
Reply
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