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Apple releases redesigned Mac mini with HDMI port starting at $699 - Page 5

post #161 of 379
I think they are moving the Mini slightly upmarket. I think at the $500-$600 pricepoint they had limited options w/r/t video/cpu cost. At the new pricepoint, with a more attractive design, they will try to leave behind the "entry level" or "basic" impressions and market as their proper desktop sans monitor.

I still can't buy it without a current processor (i5). Maybe we will see that for Christmas.
post #162 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDBLACK View Post

Yeah, I can see why they keep the mini as an entry spec computer, in contrast to the iMac which I think is a good deal as a complete computer system. Having a lower spec mini allows people to get into using macs with their existing hardware without the expense of an iMac. Making the mini more expensive defeats the purpose.

Apple has actually made the mini more expensive than the iMac, for what you get.

Yes, but they made it more expensive without adding much actual value. Yes it looks pretty and yes they got rid of the power brick. Bravo. How about getting off c2d already?
post #163 of 379
"Apple releases redesigned Mac mini with HDMI port starting at $699"... Which still happens to be some US 300.00 more than it's actually worth.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
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post #164 of 379
The thing that stuck out to me was that Aperture 3 was a BTO option. I have the latest 15" MBP Core i7 2.66Ghz and A3 runs DOG SLOW on it even with all other apps closed and 4GB of RAM.

I like that it includes HDMI and firewire 800, but price is too high to think about buying as a DVD player/photo viewer on an HDTV. I continue to use the slightly inconvenient method of unplugging my MBP from its Dell 24" monitor to the 46" Sony Bravia when I want to watch streaming Netflix, etc. Now if the Mac Mini had a BR player in it for that price, it might be tempting. I'm still waiting to make the jump to BR.
15" Core i7 2.66GHZ MacBook Pro (non-glare), 500GB 7200rpm, 16GB iPhone 4, 80gb 5.5G iPod, Airport Express, 24" Dell 2407WFP-HC
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15" Core i7 2.66GHZ MacBook Pro (non-glare), 500GB 7200rpm, 16GB iPhone 4, 80gb 5.5G iPod, Airport Express, 24" Dell 2407WFP-HC
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post #165 of 379
Scanning other forums, I think the consensus is that the Mini is now overpriced. This is not just from the usual PC fans looking for an opportunity to shout 'Apple Tax!', but also from true Apple fans who are disappointed with the increase. I predict this will be the number one item under discussion for this product for the next week or so, and then sales for the Mini (to the extent that anyone can track them reliably) will drop from the last model.

Apple makes some amazing products and runs a good business, but they are not above making mistakes. I think setting the entry point for Mac ownership at $700, without even including the monitor, keyboard, and mouse, is one such mistake.

Edit: It's already a separate article:

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...pointment.html
post #166 of 379
Originally Posted by nvidia2008
Nope, apparently nothing changed. (besides Mac mini and iPhone preorder(?))

Quote:
Originally Posted by Programmer View Post

LOL... what counts as "something" besides a new phone and a new Mac?

Heh... I meant nothing changed after the Mac mini release. And I wasn't sure when the iPhone preorders became available.

I think the sequence of events was this:

Apple Store remains up
Stealth update to Mac mini
Apple Store goes down
Apple Store goes up
iPhone preorders available

Someone clarify if needed.
post #167 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonder View Post

Does anyone proof read these things before they are posted?

"4.4 inches thin" try "1.4 inches thin"

Try 1.4" thick. It's not a press release, it's a report.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #168 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

If you think it's expensive, don't buy one. That simple.

That's a sad argument. The man said it's expensive 'cause it's the truth. Don't be so defensive when people criticize your darling.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #169 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ1970 View Post

I think that's exactly where they're going.

if that's what up next, I'll be really pissed. Also, they have better find a way to transfer exisitng movies into SD card format then. Because i'm not adopting yet another technology unless it's direct to digital. I adopted BD a year ago becuase i just can't see owning everything in some mystical "Cloud" or to depend on a hard-drive and then go through the trouble of fishing cords from the office to the living room. Right now digital (for my lifestyle) is still in physical media. And if SD card hit the market in 5 years, or even 10 years, i'm going to be pissed. They need to find a way to allow consumers to either transfer or download movies (we already own) to our computers or another format. I'm not holding my breath, but since about 1998, i have:
1. replaced my VHS with DVD
2. replaced my DVD's with BD (just a year ago)
so in 12 years i've purchased 3 sets of my movie collection, granted each time i've added/subtracted a few. But it's damn frustrating! Granted taht's exactly what the Movie/TV industry wants, but it's pissing me off!
I think we all (as consumers) need to find a way to lobby against this kind of theiving of from the industry. And they constantly wine and complain they are loosing more money every year to pirating. Well maybe if they didn't gouge thier consumer base so much, we wouldn't have to download stuff!

WOW, this was alittle trolly, sorry!
post #170 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

HDMI, but still no Blu-ray drive?

C'mon, Apple - now you're just being needlessly stubborn. Add it as a goddam option and get it over with.

Indeed, it does seem stubborn.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #171 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

That's a sad argument. The man said it's expensive 'cause it's the truth.

Nonsense. It's an opinion - or value judgment, if you will.

It may be expensive to you, but someone else may think it's a bargain. At what point is a computer 'expensive? $407.83? Or maybe it's $409.21?

Now, if he had said it was more expensive than the competition, he could provide competitive systems in the same size with the same hardware and the same quality and service for comparison - but he didn't do that, presumably because it's not possible.
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post #172 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Sales of putty knives will fall around the country to the great confusion of hardware store owners

post #173 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by antkm1 View Post

she bought it at the Apple store. i don't exactly remember the conversation, other than the outcome made her just buy the "fully-Loaded" model because they were VERY hesitant about upgrading anything. I think the actual conversation was that upgrade cost alone would not be worth the money spent, so they encouraged just to have the RAM included in the computer she purchased. Since Apple Stores only sell the Base-Model and the Fully-Loaded-Model as your only options, upgrading can be costly and time consuming for THEM.

Personally, i've always purchased computers online or over the phone, customizing each option to my needs. I like purchasing low on RAM and upgrading in a couple years because it saves money (since tech. components usually go down in price over time) and i'm a pretty average user that doesn't need the top-line model right now. I've done this with the last 3 computers i've owned (since 1993) and it's always worked well.

The fact that Apple doesn't like to do this in the past, or charges you an arm and leg for is what's frustrating; until i saw that the new Mini will allow the user to change out the RAM now. That's a welcomed new direction. And, the fact they hid the access panel in a way that doesn't affect the "Apple Look" of the device is an added bonus.

Really though, for what the mini has for specs you wouldn't really need more than 2 gigs unless your running a lot of stuff. My buddy bought a macbook just recently. Same CPU and RAM I think and he thinks its quicker than his faster spec'ed quad core windows desktop with 2x the ram.

For what you get though, I really think that mini is about $100 too much. I would not bother with any upgrades. Ram will go down in price when you need it. Thats what I did with my iMac and it really paid off.
post #174 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

If you want a cheap computer buy a Dell. You just don't get it do you.

With customers like you Apple certainly gets it anyway. The thing is a rip off, there isn't two ways about it. It's a nice looking rip off though.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #175 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

With customers like you Apple certainly gets it anyway.

Ireland! Where have ya been?
post #176 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

Scanning other forums, I think the consensus is that the Mini is now overpriced. This is not just from the usual PC fans looking for an opportunity to shout 'Apple Tax!', but also from true Apple fans who are disappointed with the increase. I predict this will be the number one item under discussion for this product for the next week or so, and then sales for the Mini (to the extent that anyone can track them reliably) will drop from the last model.

Apple makes some amazing products and runs a good business, but they are not above making mistakes. I think setting the entry point for Mac ownership at $700, without even including the monitor, keyboard, and mouse, is one such mistake.

Edit: It's already a separate article:

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...pointment.html

I've been pretty pissed about the price increase as well. But if you go to dell's website and price out a 50/50 comparable machine (the Dell Studio Hybrid) it prices out at $689.
2.2 Ghtz w/ 3MB cache, 2 gigs ram, SD slot, HDMI, etc. So even though i'm pissed abotu the price of this, it's competitive. I guess it all boils down to components.

It still is a little amazing that you couldn't get the price down to at least $499 at the entry level.
post #177 of 379
Many people have questioned this CNC-machined approach since it first appeared a couple years or so ago.

Many people have defended it on the grounds that it is consistent with the proper business strategy of maximizing margins, i.e., percentage return on operating costs, as opposed to absolute profit without regards to operating costs or margins.

The defense is ostensibly valid, i.e., it would be correct, logically speaking, if in fact the CNC-machined approach were directly tied to that proper business strategy in the way that people who offer this defense assert that it is.

But the defense is a false defense. The correct business strategy is without question to maximize percentage return on operating costs. But the part that no one has ever demonstrated to any degree whatsoever, is how this correct understanding of business strategy demonstrates that the CNC-machined approach to building computers is a sound business decision, and not simply an obsession with a certain sort of quality.

Quality is always a subjective thing, but even if that were not the case, i.e., even if there were universal agreement that the CNC-machined approach adds genuine value to the machines, the defensive argument that has been offered is still logically disjointed. The reason is simply that there is not one scintilla of proof that computers have to be built this way lest margins suffer. I reiterate: there is not a scintilla of proof of this.

The point that many people seem to lack the ability to understand, is that when the number of units of a given product goes up, the enormous overhead associated with getting the product to production is prorated over a greater quantity of units, which manifestly lowers the total per-unit cost for the manufacturer. Thus, it is manifest that any strategy that successfully increases the number of units of a particular product can be a successful strategy for lowing the per-unit cost to the manufacturer and thereby improve the margins associated with that product. This is business 101, as it were, and yet there are many, many people on this forum and elsewhere who repeatedly say stuff that contradicts this simple, well-established truth. It is a logical fallacy to simplistically equate an improvement in margins, as a percentage of operating costs, to products that cost more to produce and that consequently cost more to the consumer and that consequently sell in lower volume. The defense that various people have offered, to the use of CNC-machining for making computers, is dead simply a bogus defense.

I have long maintained, and still maintain because I am convinced that it is true, that if Apple were to sell computers priced more competitively with the PC market, that their margins would actually increase, not by some small amount that would hardly make it worth the trouble, but by an enormous amount.

I believe this for two reasons:

(1.) Most people who choose to buy a PC do so because (rightly or not) they believe that the PC is more affordable.

(2.) There is no obvious reason why Apple would not be able to make computers just as cheaply as all the other PC makers.

When I say "cheaply", I am of course talking about the cost of manufacturing. Many people will of course jump in and claim that if you do that, quality will suffer. Well, quality will suffer, but the question is whether the reduction in quality, as assessed by the minions who go to Best Buy to purchase a generic PC, obviates the reason for purchasing an Apple computer. I can not think of a single reason why this should be so. If the CNC machining is spared, and the manufacturing is more in line with the way that most other manufacturers make computers, this should not significantly detract from the perception of quality, by the minions who buy a PC. In fact, the perception of quality should not go down very much at all, but the production cost would go down by a substantial amount. The computer could be sold at a much lower price, which would have the effect of an enormous increase in sales, bringing about an immediate and appreciable boost in margins, as a percentage of operating cost.

Apple's present business strategy does not make sound business sense. They are doing damed well to be sure. But you can be doing damed well and still not be doing nearly as well as you could be doing, and this is the case with Apple. I am 100% convinced of this.

There is only one rational argument that throws a wrench into this. If it should happen that people who presently are willing to pay the premium price for the Apple product would opt for the lower-priced Apple product if it were available at a lower price, then Apple would lose sales on those higher-priced products. If this were to happen, it is manifest that this could potentially have a negative impact on overall margins. But it is far from obvious that this would happen, and I am inclined to think that it would not happen. I am inclined to think that as long as the higher-priced products are adequately distinguished from the lower-priced products in terms of material and in terms of performance, then I see no reason to think that the present market for Apple computers would migrate to the lower-priced Apple product.

Why can't there be a Mini made the old-fashioned, cheaper way, selling alongside the newer, sexier, CNC-machined aluminum Mini? Evidently, Apple believes that if they were to do that, that it would steal sales from the sexy, aluminum Mini, and that the sales would be split between the two such that the product development overhead would prorate to a higher per-unit cost for each version. I cannot rule this out, but if the concern is valid, then the other way to manage this concern is simply not to commence development of the CNC-machined version in the first place, and to stick with the cheaper production method for this, the low-end, affordable version of the Apple computer. It will be very interesting to observe the change in the sales numbers for the new Mini as compared to the old, over the next year or so. Of course, even if the public has access to those numbers, it won't be worth much unless you also know the per-unit margins for both the old model and the new model.

The bottom line is that even after having puzzled over this for a couple of years now, I remain fully convinced that this CNC-machining business does not actually have much at all to do with maximizing margins as a percentage of operating costs. Rather, I am convinced that all it is really about is an obsession with making products that strive to a certain subjective sort of quality, with absolute indifference to any business reality. This is my opinion, and like everyone else, I am entitled to have and to share my opinion.
post #178 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

I believe that would be the green "power on" light. It is far too small to be an IR port, or even a paper clip hole--as some have suggested.

The "square" is the IR sensor, the "circle" is the power-light.

Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #179 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemonmeringue View Post

I think they are moving the Mini slightly upmarket. I think at the $500-$600 pricepoint they had limited options w/r/t video/cpu cost. At the new pricepoint, with a more attractive design, they will try to leave behind the "entry level" or "basic" impressions and market as their proper desktop sans monitor.

I still can't buy it without a current processor (i5). Maybe we will see that for Christmas.

Apple can't do an i5 with integrated nvidia graphics due to intels licensing restrictions. Apple using an i5 in the mini would require a discreet graphics card or settling for intels crappy integrated graphics.

For those of you complaining about the price, have you ever built a computer? You can spend <$50 on a case and power supply or you can spend a couple hundred (or more). Neither setup will change the specs of the machine, but your choice will greatly influence the cost. Apple shrunk the mini, switched to a unibody enclosure, and integrated the power supply. That is impressive, it's not surprising that they want to be paid extra for it.
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post #180 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

The "square" is the IR sensor, the "circle" is the power-light.


Is that thing sticking its tongue out at me?
post #181 of 379
I'll admit that the updated Mac Mini looks nice, but for a MINIMUM of six benjamins, I feel it is quite underwhelming. I think the arguements in the end boil down to (again) being able to use OS X, which is a defense used for all Apple products. Also, lets not forget that $600 gets you only the computer. I just did a trial buy on Apple's site... $1,934 for the base configuration + 27" Apple monitor, Apple wireless keyboard & magic mouse, iWork, and AppleCare. Yikes.


As a side note, now that the PSU is located within the housing, I wonder just how hot that sucker will get what with the CPU, GPU, PSU, HDD, and up to 8GBs of RAM confined into a 1.4" x 7.7" space. Forget frying eggs, I'll be able to grill me a sirloin on that baby.
post #182 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Evil View Post

Is that thing sticking its tongue out at me?

Yes, when you said you're too expensive it did that. Then is said: "What you gonna do about it?"
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #183 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

but for a MINIMUM of six benjamins

7 actually. $699+tax
post #184 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaisersoze View Post

The bottom line is that even after having puzzled over this for a couple of years now, I remain fully convinced that this CNC-machining business does not actually have much at all to do with maximizing margins as a percentage of operating costs. Rather, I am convinced that all it is really about is an obsession with making products that strive to a certain subjective sort of quality, with absolute indifference to any business reality. This is my opinion, and like everyone else, I am entitled to have and to share my opinion.

It has got to do with marketing, product design, and Apple's vision. Steve openly says that the design and vision drives most of what Apple does. It so happens that Steve can run a business pretty well alongside the right people covering the different areas. And he never says it openly, which is further proof of, him being an absolute marketing genius.

That said though, the unibody for the laptop line is definitely form and function coming together. There is no comparable build quality (but note - not necessarily component and replacement part quality) in the laptop arena. If you've used the plastic MacBooks, the non-unibody MacBook Pro, when it comes to the unibody, it really is stunning. It's far from perfect when it comes to components failing, replacing certain components and servicing, because sometimes you have to replace the entire unibody which is one whole piece of aluminium, recyclable or whatever, to replace. Also, the area where the CD/DVD slot is somewhat softer, mine is squeezed somewhat from I don't know how, there are no other real indications of damage due to drops.

Apple's brilliance is both amazing and infuriating, compelling and confusing, inspiring and frustrating all at the same time.

To sum up, I agree, CNC-machining unibody etc was NEVER about reducing costs. NEVER.

[Is it about the environment? Maybe, maybe not...]
post #185 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

...
Let's go through the process:

Apple evaluates all the options out there. They could build a computer in a cardboard box. They could build the legendary midi-Mac. They could build a Mini with BD. They could build a Mac Pro with 8 six-core processors. And so on.

Now, based on their 30 years of experience and best marketing skills in the industry, they have chosen a product range. This range was selected as being their evaluation of what would yield them the greatest profits by satisfying the largest number of customers. They've demonstrated an uncanny ability to do this - at least based on results over the last 5 years or so.

You were making a great point up until you typed the part in bold. Apple only cares about the greatest profits (as it should be, that isn't a dig). You are foolish to assume the greatest profits come with the largest amount of customers.

The design was chosen it to make it look cool. Its price was raised to increase profits. Steve knows his users and his users are form over function idiots as a rule. They rather pay a lot of money for a cool looking under powered computer, than have a basic looking mid-tower with a 3 year in home warranty, more RAM, bigger faster HD, and better CPU/GPU performance.

If you think about it, the same logic lead a bunch of people into buying SUVs when they would have been better served with something more practical.

Mac Mini buyer = SUV buyer (in terms of intelligence at least)

-kpluck

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post #186 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't really want to replace one BRD with another if that one is working fine. I certainly don't want two on the same TV.

True, but then there are many of us who have not yet made the jump to a BRD player. Sure they have come down in price, but for me it's not a matter of price. It's a matter of limited space and limited connections. My DVD player was removed to make room for a mini. And there is no room for a standalone BRD player. So either TiVo makes a unit with blu-ray (like they licensed others to do with DVD players) or Apple adds blu-ray to either AppleTV or the mini.

I still think it would be a great long-term strategy for Apple to use a blu-ray player in the AppleTV as a Trogan horse to get units into living rooms. Then let the convenience of online movies build it's own momentum.
post #187 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

... I just did a trial buy on Apple's site... $1,934 for the base configuration + 27" Apple monitor, Apple wireless keyboard & magic mouse, iWork, and AppleCare. Yikes. ...

Which 27" display is that?

And, if that's what you need to buy, the iMac is definitely a better deal. The Mini has always been targeted at users who already have a monitor+keyboard+mouse.
post #188 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaisersoze View Post

The bottom line is that even after having puzzled over this for a couple of years now, I remain fully convinced that this CNC-machining business does not actually have much at all to do with maximizing margins as a percentage of operating costs. Rather, I am convinced that all it is really about is an obsession with making products that strive to a certain subjective sort of quality, with absolute indifference to any business reality. This is my opinion, and like everyone else, I am entitled to have and to share my opinion.

I think Apple care about profits, but they also care about the quality of their products and the reputation of their brand. They try to make as much profit as possible from the kind of products they want to build, rather than build the products that will make the most money. It comes down to whether $$$ are something that enables you to do what you want to do, or something that controls what you do.
post #189 of 379
I love the new Mac Mini design, but as is often the case with newly-redesigned products the first generation has poor bang for the buck. I expect the next revision will correct that, with either improved specs or a lowered price or both. With the iPad, my need for a laptop has diminished to almost zero, but my 24" LED Display has ruled out an iMac as a possibility. With this revision to the Mac Mini, it's finally a serious option as a home computer that can handle pro work (dedicated graphics and user-accessible memory). This first version though has roughly the same specs as my 1.5 year-old MacBook Pro, so it's going to need a revision or two before it would actually be an upgrade from my current computer. My only hesitation is the 5400RPM drive, and how difficult it may or may not be to replace that with a 7200rpm drive.
post #190 of 379
1 - It is the same size, area wise, as the Apple TV. Did Apple do this so they could be stacked nice and neat? If so, why?

2 - Reason for HDMI. Is it so games can be played on HDTVs (sound and video using one cable)

Future updates to other Apple products and services

3 - Will the Apple TV get an A4 processor and be able to play 1080p video?

4 - Will the iTunes Store offer 1080p video? Gotta give the the Apple TV gigabit ethernet.

5 - (See #1) An Apple TV on top of a Mac mini server would look sweet. Everything would be stored on the Mac mini and the Apple TV would be the hardware equivalent of the iTunes application. The Apple TV gets FireWire 800 so the two can be connected. Turn the current HDMI connector 90 degrees and put a FireWire connector between it and the component video and the FireWire ports will be aligned vertically.
post #191 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cory Bauer View Post

dedicated graphics

It's the shared memory/integrated version of the 320M. But still twice as fast as the current 9400M supposedly.
post #192 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I think Apple care about profits, but they also care about the quality of their products and the reputation of their brand. They try to make as much profit as possible from the kind of products they want to build, rather than build the products that will make the most money. It comes down to whether $$$ are something that enables you to do what you want to do, or something that controls what you do.

It's actually simpler than that. Apple maximizes profits by maximizing user experience. They have found that it is often more profitable for them to use a more expensive component - if it improves the user experience in some way. Basically, Apple is doing what most businesses should be doing - focusing on the long term relationship with the customer rather than next week's profits.
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post #193 of 379
So if you are buying this for a desktop system, rather than a HTPC, why not just save up an extra $200 and buy a white MacBook instead? That way you can output to your desktop monitor, hookup your keyboard and mouse and still have portability too.

Looking thru the Apple Store, you have to spend $1800 with Apple (15" MBP) to be able to purchase an i5 chip. Anything cheaper runs on c2d. That is just ridiculous
post #194 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Which 27" display is that?

And, if that's what you need to buy, the iMac is definitely a better deal. The Mini has always been targeted at users who already have a monitor+keyboard+mouse.

Whoops, my bad. Meant the 24". Was thinking of the 27" iMac. Even still though.

Then why buy a Mini in the first place then? I see coflicting arguments. Also, at least according to some here, every product other than Apple is sheer crap. If that's the sentiment, then yes, a buyer (lets say first time) would have to buy the whole Apple arrangement to get the full "asthetic."
post #195 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by iReality85 View Post

Then why buy a Mini in the first place then?

If you've already got the monitor+keyboard+mouse, it's not a bad deal. $300 less than a MacBook, $500 less than entry iMac. Or, if you want to run it headless as a server.
post #196 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

If you've already got the monitor+keyboard+mouse, it's not a bad deal. $300 less than a MacBook, $500 less than entry iMac. Or, if you want to run it headless as a server.

Maybe some of the Mac mini redesign is to roll off the iPad success. Those who have an iPad may carry that around if they don't really need a laptop. Then at home, pop in a new ultra-sexy Mac mini into their desktop setup. Boom!

iPad's the bait, Mac mini the hook, iMac the upsell.

For me though, I definitely need a MacBook/Pro. I just connect my 13" MacBook Aluminium 2ghz to an external monitor a few times a week at home or at work.

Though I've been playing with a friends 15" non-unibody MacBook Pro. Them 15" screen really helps, may not need an external monitor. But, back to the cost of the 15" ... Hmm
post #197 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux
I think that's what people have a problem with. Apple prioritized miniaturization, but for a stationary machine that seems to be an unsavory (and unnecessary) compromise. By shrinking the form factor Apple has both boxed themselves in a corner in terms of user-expandability AND added to the production costs. And for what?


You are talking like a computer geek. Computer geeks aren't the audience that this product is aimed at. Try this experiment: Take your wife or girlfriend to Best Buy and parade her by the biggest, baddest, PC in the store, then have her walk by the new Mac Mini and ask her which one she would rather have in her house. I assure you, a dissertation on bus speed and expansion slots is not going be very persuasive on her.

Oh, and if you do try this experiment, I hope you enjoy your new Mac Mini!
post #198 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetlaw View Post

You are talking like a computer geek. Computer geeks aren't the audience that this product is aimed at. Try this experiment: Take your wife or girlfriend to Best Buy and parade her by the biggest, baddest, PC in the store, then have her walk by the new Mac Mini and ask her which one she would rather have in her house. I assure you, a dissertation on bus speed and expansion slots is not going be very persuasive on her.

Oh, and if you do try this experiment, I hope you enjoy your new Mac Mini!

The problem is once you show her the iMac, you're done for. Mac mini is nice but the cables! Argh that would kill the beautiful design... And pairing up the Mac mini with poor-looking monitors, keyboard and cheap mice, that makes Jonny Ive cry at night.
post #199 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Try 1.4" thick. It's not a press release, it's a report.

I hate it when marketing does that. I don't need someone to tell me that it's thin. The dimension tells me that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaisersoze View Post

Quality is always a subjective thing, but even if that were not the case, i.e., even if there were universal agreement that the CNC-machined approach adds genuine value to the machines, the defensive argument that has been offered is still logically disjointed. The reason is simply that there is not one scintilla of proof that computers have to be built this way lest margins suffer. I reiterate: there is not a scintilla of proof of this.

Really? Have you compared the rigidity of Apple notebooks with competing notebooks? You don't think that they make money by using build quality as a selling point? How about the weight savings from using the shell as part of the structure? Computers don't have to be built that way, but it seems to be a winning strategy for Apple. Unibody is probably hard to copycat.

The machining costs money, but then, it also simplifies assembly too and reduces other production costs, the shell eliminates a lot of the internal brackets and braces that would be necessary, each of those brackets and braces required a series of dies and fixtures to produce.

I don't know if the increase in the mini price is worth it, but with respect to the rest of the line, maybe Apple can make more money by selling less expensive computers, but they're making plenty of money now, and Apple's computer sales are growing about as fast as they can. Increasing sales too quickly can have problems, such as customer service and warranty problems.

Pointing to competitors probably isn't going to help, because they're in a race to the bottom with diminishing margins. I don't think it makes sense to say that Apple can win at that game when everyone else is skating by doing just that.
post #200 of 379
Why this is a good deal is that this is NOT JUST a home theater box. It's a small computer that I can easily hook to my flat screen TV. With a wireless kbd and the new touch mouse this makes a great cowputer for the living room. My itunes collection can play via the stereo. The videos I have in my collection can play. I can play games. I can surf the web. I'm just not sure if I want the server version or the regular one. My wife has been asking for an apple computer and this is just perfect for her.
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