or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Apple releases redesigned Mac mini with HDMI port starting at $699
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Apple releases redesigned Mac mini with HDMI port starting at $699 - Page 2

post #41 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post

No IR port? What a way to convince someone to shell out the money for one. Maybe can't convince enough people to buy the Apple TV, so those that opted for a mini for the same task are given spite?

What got me to try Apple was the $499 model back then, I don't think $699 would have done the trick.

It is pricy but I have to assume Apple knows who's what people are willing to spend on the Mac Mini and that perhaps many were buying a more expensive model anyway.

This is pretty slick. I can't believe they got it that thin AND got the power supply into the device. Still, as impressive as it is to me it seems too extreme for the price. I don't see what the problem would be to allow more internal space. Than again, there are plenty of companies that offer that option and I ignore them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by s4mb4 View Post

i wish it had a better CPU. i would buy one today if i could get a quad core option. oh well....

I think this is a 25W CPU and the lowest Quad is 45W. With an 85W power supply I don't think that is possible.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorre View Post

You can order the Apple Remote with it, I don't think they'd do that if it didn't have an IR port... Besides, they market this as an HTPC... of course it'll have one

That being said, this is such poor value compared to the MacBook... or anything else from Apple's product line for that matter. And it's not like Apple's product line has an amazing specs/price ratio to begin with.

Excellent point. Either they have failed to mention it on their Tech Specs page or they goofed and didn't remove it from the accessories page.

Maybe it's hiding in the optical drive bay, out of sight. Hopefully iFixit can dismantle one before you I awake.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #42 of 379
Amazing upgrade, but as others have said, the price increase might be a deal breaker for the intended audience.
post #43 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mobius View Post

Way too expensive for what is supposed to be an entry level Mac. Think I'll pass.

If you want a cheap computer buy a Dell. You just don't get it do you.
post #44 of 379
What is it with Apple and blu-ray? This really is getting rather tragic now. I wish they'd just grow up and bury whatever hatchet is stopping them adopting BD.
post #45 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by replicant View Post

A bit too expensive IMHO. I think the target market for this would rather purchase a cheap PC for half the price even if it's less reliable and doesn't pack the software goodies of a mac.

And why did Apple put an aluminum unibody design on this thing? It makes sense on a laptop but I don't see the advantage on an entry level desktop. I would rather see a more affordable material like plastic and save $.

I personally would like to see more aluminum than plastic....I would like to see Apple make the TimeCapsule/Router in recyclable aluminum rather than the current plastic as well.

It's the environment baby!
post #46 of 379
I think it's a great upgrade. When was the last time a Mac got a major case redesign? And they managed to fit the power supply inside which was a total surprise to me. One less USB port - perhaps they needed the internal connector for the camera card?

I will certainly be getting one, since the Mini is my main machine and I have been hanging for this upgrade. The only question is whether to get the server version or not, and use the extra internal drive for Time Machine.

Unsurprisingly, Macrumors is full of people bitching about the price, but then that board is full of cash-poor teenagers. I would have expected people here to be more appreciative of the design aspects.
post #47 of 379
YES! A Mac I can connect to all the stuff I already own plus all the stuff everyone I know owns!

Monumental. For me, this is bigger than the iPad.

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply

Many of the most important software concepts were invented in the 70s and forgotten in the 80s.

Reply
post #48 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

If you want a cheap computer buy a Dell. You just don't get it do you.

The iPhone only exploded (in terms of sales) when it became affordable. If Apple ever wants to Mac to be anything other than niche, it will need to compete with Dell, HP etc.
post #49 of 379
It's interesting and good that Firewire is still included. I guess rumours of it's impending demise, that Apple was moving away from it, were greatly exaggerated.

And the HDMI explicitly supports audio output as mentioned in the spec page, but interestingly I don't believe it mentions the mini-DisplayPort supporting audio out even though that has been introduced in the MacBook Pros.
post #50 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

It's one Blu-ray drive away from replacing a lot of people's BD living room component and consolidating all that crap into a single box. Remember that it ships with a CD-R and DVD-R, which, while relatively inexpensive these days, can be credited towards the cost of a universal BD drive that leaves out all the burning capabilities for living room use.

Unfortunately the $700 starting price is already a steep climb for a dedicated media computer.

I don't really want to replace one BRD with another if that one is working fine. I certainly don't want two on the same TV. Then there is the issue with using a PC for an HDTV. It's wasn't cost effective then and it's even worse now with this Mini.

For Blu-ray, the first thing we should expect isn't for Apple to add it to the Mac Mini, but to add AACS to Mac OS X so even 3rd-party BRDs will play protected BR content. Then adding BRDs to Mac Pros and updating their Pro apps. I think the Mac Mini is pretty much last on the list, along with the other notebooks and consumer PCs.

And adding $600* to the price of that device just to get a BRD seems excessive.

* That was the upgrade price the other OEMs were charging for a 9.5mm BRD last time I checked.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #51 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Macrumors is full of people bitching about the price, but then that board is full of cash-poor teenagers..

Coming from the guy who has a mini as his "main" computer.



For a laugh, go over to MR and watch how Solipsism got run off for spouting off his usual, ill-informed BS.
post #52 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

Where did you get those specs?

- The IR port is integrated at the edge of the OD slot. Even the server model has a dot on the front for IR.
- There is no external power adapter.

Edit: many others pointed out the IR port earlier.
Edit2: The remote control itself is listed as an accessory: http://www.apple.com/macmini/specs.html

Yeah, but no info of the IR port on any of the pages.

Looking at this pic it seems clear that the IR port is that right side of the ODD.

Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #53 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I would have expected people here to be more appreciative of the design aspects.

The design is gorgeous but, in Spain, $950 for the base configuration is way too much.
post #54 of 379
Great new design, but it needs to have Blu-Ray for that HDMI port they brag about to be of any use. And for the price they're asking now, it ought to be included. Way, way too expensive.
post #55 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

If you want a cheap computer buy a Dell. You just don't get it do you.

You know, it is possible to be a long-time Apple customer and yet still not agree with the price.

At this point, the entry point for Mac OS has just risen another notch. Five years ago it was $500, and while today's Mini is obviously much more capable the pricing trend has not been favorable for those wanting an entry-level machine or a lesser-used second machine. There's no technical reason that Apple can't offer a stripped-down unit (no disc burning, smaller HD, slower processor) for $500 and reclaim at lot more hobbyists.

Well, there's always the refurb market...
post #56 of 379
Quote:
What is it with Apple and blu-ray? This really is getting rather tragic now. I wish they'd just grow up and bury whatever hatchet is stopping them adopting BD.

I really don't see blu-ray coming to Apple for a few of reasons:

1) Steve has expressly stated his disdain for the blu-ray format;

2) Apple has a vested interest in delivering content, including HD, via the iTunes store;

3) Optical drives consume significant power just to spin the disk, and battery life has been a key concern for all of Apple's recent products (excluding the iMac and Mini, of course);

4) Steve/Apple have a history of killing off "legacy" peripherals;


Considered together, blu-ray is a format that Steve dislikes, which consumes substantial power, competes with the iTunes store, and takes up space in mobile products that could be used for additional battery.

I suspect that we are within 12 months of seeing built-in optical drives become a thing of the past for Apple portables. Apple has shown a recent propensity to cater to the mass-market, even when it means delivering solutions that are not as tailored to the specialist as they once were.

I truly believe that the typical user hardly ever uses their optical drive. It definitely strikes me as a component that takes up much more space than it is worth in a portable device.
post #57 of 379
I really have to take my hat off to Apple's engineering team. I thought the original iMac was pretty compact, but this is really amazing. You really need to ask yourself how they managed to fit everything in there and improve in specs over of the old model at the same time. Certainly looking forward to the tear down.

For those complaining it is expensive, then maybe it is, but try to find something with an equivalent specification and form factor from the competition.
post #58 of 379
Looks like a nice upgrade to me.
While I did like the price before , I think its still a good deal at 699.

A quick comparison to another PC that could be in the Mini category and I see another Mini PC for $650US without an optical Drive , Max of 4GB memory, and 2.2 Duo.

If i needed to replace the PC I have this would be something I would consider.

2010 MacBook Pro 13, 2.66
Dell XPS 420 - Gaming PC
iPhone 3G 8GB
iPhone 4 on StraightTalk

Reply

2010 MacBook Pro 13, 2.66
Dell XPS 420 - Gaming PC
iPhone 3G 8GB
iPhone 4 on StraightTalk

Reply
post #59 of 379
Nice upgrade over the previous mini, But, the price increase is disappointing especially since it still comes with just 2 GB of ram.
post #60 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetlaw View Post

I truly believe that the typical user hardly ever uses their optical drive. It definitely strikes me as a component that takes up much more space than it is worth in a portable device.

It's not as if Apple has to produce an entirely different case just to offer it as an option. (Well, maybe now they would, having reduced the Mini to such a degree that OEM options are getting tougher to find.)

For the record, I have a (refurb) Mini in my living room and use it primarily for Netflix DVDs. I don't own a BluRay player yet but intend to when the stars align - I've lived this long without it and can wait. But Apple is clearly pushing me away as a customer for a replacement media machine for nothing other than ideological reasons. I agree with most of their decisions to move away from legacy hardware, but I think they're wrong on this one. I'd be willing to bet that there are millions of potential customers looking to buy an all-in-one living room Mac that handles all of their A/V needs. (The Apple TV, by Apple's own admission, is not that machine. It's still a 'hobby'.)
post #61 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

There's no technical reason that Apple can't offer a stripped-down unit (no disc burning, smaller HD, slower processor) for $500 and reclaim at lot more hobbyists.

Not technical, it's all business. I can't think of a single reason why they had to Mac Min had to be as small as it was or as small as it is now. It's impressive but it certainly doesn't seem like a practical expense for those looking for a low cost Mac, but maybe we're the ones looking at this wrong. Maybe Apple is focusing these on a different user.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #62 of 379
1.4" thick? Holy cow! Included power supply. It just keeps getting better. There is hope for a chinless iMac yet.

Just imagine how the next AppleTV will look. Nuts.

I understand that $699 is a bit high for an entry level computer and I think $599 would have been more appropriate.
Hard-Core.
Reply
Hard-Core.
Reply
post #63 of 379
Dear Mr Jobs (or, if any Apple employees are reading this, please forward),

Myself and many like me will immediately purchase a small computer than can:

- play DVDs
- play CDs
- play an iTunes library (either from it's own hard disk or, from a NAS)
- play ripped DVDs (either from it's own hard disk or, from a NAS) - and hey, I know the industry doesn't like it but it is a fact that a lot of people do this.
- surf the internet
- connect to a HDTV for video
- connect to a receiver for audio
- has a user friendly front end (Front Row will do but I'm sure Apple can improve on this solid foundation)
- play Blu-ray

I know the AppleTV is pitched at this but it doesn't quite hit the mark. Seriously, you really need to reconsider BD. For many reasons, people just prefer BD. For me, it's because the iTunes downloads do not match the quality of a disc.

The new Mini would be the perfect vehicle to carry Apple into the home theatre market as it would capitalise on the iTunes / iPod ecosystem.

Unfortunately, a lot of the people that are still holding out for a BD mini will eventually give up and buy a dedicated player and that potential link between the Mini and the living room will be forever lost.

[Of course, the alternative would be an AppleTV with a BD slot!]

Assuring you of my future business if you BD.

Kind regards,

MJW.
post #64 of 379
Here is an old site for making your Mac MIni work and act more like an TV.

http://www.wiseontech.com/release/appletv-for-mac
Quote:
Originally Posted by aplnub View Post

Just imagine how the next AppleTV will look. Nuts.

If based on the A4 and iOS it could be as small as this: http://www.ixbt.com/td/images/ipod-nano-2-dock-back.jpg (image)
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #65 of 379
holy crap. Nicely done apple.
What I got... 15" i7 w/8 gigs ram,iPad2 64gig wifi, 2.0 mac mini, 2.0 17" imac, appleTv, Still running my old G4 466 upgraded to 1.2GHz maxed ram as a pro tools machine, and 2 iphones.
Reply
What I got... 15" i7 w/8 gigs ram,iPad2 64gig wifi, 2.0 mac mini, 2.0 17" imac, appleTv, Still running my old G4 466 upgraded to 1.2GHz maxed ram as a pro tools machine, and 2 iphones.
Reply
post #66 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I can't imagine many would pay for the Blu-ray drive that would fit into that machine.

The funny part is that half of the whiners are saying it's too expensive while the other half are saying it needs to have BD added (which would it cost for a BD drive small enough for the Mini? An extra $500 or more?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mobius View Post

It is expensive for what is in the box. And no, I won't buy one - I don't have more money than sense. For your information, I'm waiting on the new Mac Pros. I wouldn't touch a Windows machine with a barge pole. I hate Microsoft and everything they stand for.

But I refuse to lay down money on a machine, whatever make, if the bang for you buck ratio is skewed too far towards the buck, and not the bang. I get that the superior software is part of the value. That's not the argument.

You look at the comments over at Macrumors and you'll see that many many posters agree that this price point is ridiculous.

Yes, but there are posters who whine about everything. At the same time as some people whine, Apple is obviously selling a lot of Minis, so there are people who think they're fairly priced. There is no RIGHT price. Apple sets the price that they think is appropriate and you decide to buy or not to buy. It's that simple.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hattig View Post

Or buy a non-cheap semi-decent Dell/HP/etc that's still cheaper, twice as fast with discrete graphics... Dell sell a small form factor quad-core Inspiron 560s with 4GB, 750GB for £500, or 6GB, 1TB, HD5450 for £560. Comes with a limited version of Excel and Word too (see my comment above about including iWork in the price to sweeten the deal).

Of course it doesn't come with Mac OS X, and it doesn't look as nice - but it's a far easier sell. Apart from the stupid Dell online ordering system that take forever to click through billions of options, some of which appear twice!

As I said, you're free to buy a cheapo system with immense failure rates and support lines that require you to speak Swahili if you wish. No one is stopping you.

BTW, That Inspiron is over twice the size of the Mini - miniaturization costs money.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

You know, it is possible to be a long-time Apple customer and yet still not agree with the price.

At this point, the entry point for Mac OS has just risen another notch. Five years ago it was $500, and while today's Mini is obviously much more capable the pricing trend has not been favorable for those wanting an entry-level machine or a lesser-used second machine. There's no technical reason that Apple can't offer a stripped-down unit (no disc burning, smaller HD, slower processor) for $500 and reclaim at lot more hobbyists.

Of course there's no technical reason. Apple could sell a motherboard and power supply in a cardboard box for $100 if they wish. But that's not the business they're in. They've chose to offer the current Mini as their entry point based on 30 years of industry experience and the best marketing team (at least for technology products) in the world. All these complaints are just plain foolish - until you can demonstrate that you can do it better.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #67 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

If you want a cheap computer buy a Dell. You just don't get it do you.

I think most everyone here "gets it" just fine. I think the argument is that while the Mini obviously received a good redesign, this is really just an incremental bump. Yeah, the SD card slot is new and the integrated power supply is nice, but the $100 price increase is pretty painful for most. I talked my parents into a Mini last fall, and if it were $100 more it may very well have been a deal breaker for them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

What is it with Apple and blu-ray? This really is getting rather tragic now. I wish they'd just grow up and bury whatever hatchet is stopping them adopting BD.

You really think that if Apple was going to introduce Blu-Ray to the Mac lineup it would happen in the Mini refresh? I suppose that's not totally unrealistic since the Mini is a good home theater/media player option, but I would really think that the iMac would be where they would introduce the Blu-Ray if they were going to.
post #68 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

...maybe we're the ones looking at this wrong. Maybe Apple is focusing these on a different user.

That much is clear.

I don't think most people here are clamoring for a return to the 90's when Apple cranked out a full catalog of desktop machines to compete at every PC price point, but damn, $500 is psychologically significant for a lot of people. I know a lot of people who would love to invest in Apple's ecosystem but simply cannot justify a $700 starting point without even including the monitor or keyboard!

I guess Apple wants to accelerate their revenue base away from Mac OS and towards iOS faster than many of us expected. For $500 people now shop for an iPad, not a Mac.
post #69 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjw View Post

Dear Mr Jobs (or, if any Apple employees are reading this, please forward),

Myself and many like me will immediately purchase a small computer than can:

- play DVDs
- play CDs
- play an iTunes library (either from it's own hard disk or, from a NAS)
- play ripped DVDs (either from it's own hard disk or, from a NAS) - and hey, I know the industry doesn't like it but it is a fact that a lot of people do this.
- surf the internet
- connect to a HDTV for video
- connect to a receiver for audio
- has a user friendly front end (Front Row will do but I'm sure Apple can improve on this solid foundation)
- play Blu-ray

I know the AppleTV is pitched at this but it doesn't quite hit the mark. Seriously, you really need to reconsider BD. For many reasons, people just prefer BD. For me, it's because the iTunes downloads do not match the quality of a disc.

The new Mini would be the perfect vehicle to carry Apple into the home theatre market as it would capitalise on the iTunes / iPod ecosystem.

Unfortunately, a lot of the people that are still holding out for a BD mini will eventually give up and buy a dedicated player and that potential link between the Mini and the living room will be forever lost.

[Of course, the alternative would be an AppleTV with a BD slot!]

Assuring you of my future business if you BD.

Kind regards,

MJW.

http://www.lyricsdomain.com/18/rolli..._you_want.html
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #70 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetlaw View Post

I really don't see blu-ray coming to Apple for a few of reasons:

1) Steve has expressly stated his disdain for the blu-ray format;

2) Apple has a vested interest in delivering content, including HD, via the iTunes store;

3) Optical drives consume significant power just to spin the disk, and battery life has been a key concern for all of Apple's recent products (excluding the iMac and Mini, of course);

4) Steve/Apple have a history of killing off "legacy" peripherals;


Considered together, blu-ray is a format that Steve dislikes, which consumes substantial power, competes with the iTunes store, and takes up space in mobile products that could be used for additional battery.

I suspect that we are within 12 months of seeing built-in optical drives become a thing of the past for Apple portables. Apple has shown a recent propensity to cater to the mass-market, even when it means delivering solutions that are not as tailored to the specialist as they once were.

I truly believe that the typical user hardly ever uses their optical drive. It definitely strikes me as a component that takes up much more space than it is worth in a portable device.

A few points:

1) Steve has not expressed his disdain for BD. He dislikes the patent costs involved with it.
2) The mini still has optical media. I don't really see how this is relevant as it hasn't been removed yet
3) Optical drives take power to spin up. After that, they require very little power to sustain

Even if they dropped a Blu-Ray drive in this one, the OS doesn't support it. What would be the point unless they wanted to force you to use BootCamp. Unless Apple included the support to decrypt store bought video discs, it would be useful only as a burner, and a reader for non-encrypted discs

On your final point, the mini is a desktop computer. It is not portable in the sense of a laptop, or an iPad/iPhone. I did find the addition of the SD Card Reader interesting. An embedded reader could eventually replace optical if the costs become competitive enough.
3.4GHz Quad-Core Intel Core i7 / iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 6 Plus 64GB /iPad with Retina Display 64 GB
Reply
3.4GHz Quad-Core Intel Core i7 / iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 6 Plus 64GB /iPad with Retina Display 64 GB
Reply
post #71 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by kotatsu View Post

What is it with Apple and blu-ray? This really is getting rather tragic now. I wish they'd just grow up and bury whatever hatchet is stopping them adopting BD.

Blu-ray is history, that's why you'll never see a BRD in an Apple product. Apple called the death of the floppy drive correctly, and they've called this one too. Blu-ray was only ever going to be a temporary stepping stone to getting HD content delivered over the net (something that Apple are heavily invested in btw). The format war with HD-DVD made sure it got off the ground just as that stepping stone was no longer really required.
post #72 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

That much is clear.

I don't think most people here are clamoring for a return to the 90's when Apple cranked out a full catalog of desktop machines to compete at every PC price point, but damn, $500 is psychologically significant for a lot of people. I know a lot of people who would love to invest in Apple's ecosystem but simply cannot justify a $700 starting point without even including the monitor or keyboard!

I guess Apple wants to accelerate their revenue base away from Mac OS and towards iOS faster than many of us expected. For $500 people now shop for an iPad, not a Mac.

It seems like Apple no long wants this to be an entry level product. The design, attention to detail and (likely) the engineering we'll see from the teardown will show this is now svelt premium product.

There is very little reason for them to use a milled block of aluminium for this machine type and to make it so small. It's more like a proof-of-concept than a machine you'd expect to see on the market.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #73 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

BTW, That Inspiron is over twice the size of the Mini - miniaturization costs money.

I think that's what people have a problem with. Apple prioritized miniaturization, but for a stationary machine that seems to be an unsavory (and unnecessary) compromise. By shrinking the form factor Apple has both boxed themselves in a corner in terms of user-expandability AND added to the production costs. And for what?
post #74 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

I personally would like to see more aluminum than plastic....I would like to see Apple make the TimeCapsule/Router in recyclable aluminum rather than the current plastic as well.

It's the environment baby!

Plastic can be recycled or they could have used recycled plastic actually. When you market an entry product like the Mac Mini, it comes down to pricing.
post #75 of 379
I wonder if it would send 24/96 audio signals to my receiver via HDMI, when playing 24/96 music I already have in iTunes...

Given that I already have all my music and other media on my main system - and need to keep it there - I don't think it will do what I need. I can't choose to sync my current library with it, like I can and love with AppleTV. If Apple started supporting a "home cloud", it would be a lot more attractive...
post #76 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yeah, but no info of the IR port on any of the pages.

Looking at this pic it seems clear that the IR port is that right side of the ODD.


I believe that would be the green "power on" light. It is far too small to be an IR port, or even a paper clip hole--as some have suggested.
GIGO. The truth in all of life.
Reply
GIGO. The truth in all of life.
Reply
post #77 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

If you think it's expensive, don't buy one. That simple. Go ahead and buy your POS cheap box which has a 40% failure rate out of the box and which requires you to talk to someone in Swahili to get support.

Meanwhile, here in the real world, the Mini server is a super value. Please look up the cost of Windows server with unlimited client licenses. Heck, the software alone is considerably more expensive than the Mac Mini server.

Berating people is uncalled for. The point is that Apple has increased the price. Which is a step backwards.
post #78 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dlux View Post

I think that's what people have a problem with. Apple prioritized miniaturization, but for a stationary machine that seems to be an unsavory (and unnecessary) compromise. By shrinking the form factor Apple has both boxed themselves in a corner in terms of user-expandability AND added to the production costs. And for what?

The smaller Apple makes their products, the smaller they can make the boxes. The smaller the boxes, the cheaper it is to ship them. I'm pretty sure this new Mac Mini doesn't cost Apple any more to get to the store than the last one (production cost included). Smaller form factor + no external PSU. The box for this thing is barely gonna be bigger than the Mac Mini itself.
post #79 of 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post

I believe that would be the green "power on" light. It is far too small to be an IR port, or even a paper clip hole--as some have suggested.

The IR receiver is the gap at the edge of the slot. The server model, which leaves out the optical drive, has a 'dot' on the front instead.

http://www.apple.com/macmini/server/

(Why a server would need or even benefit from an IR controller is a mystery, however.)
post #80 of 379
edit: Pipped by Dlux.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Future Apple Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Future Apple Hardware › Apple releases redesigned Mac mini with HDMI port starting at $699