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56% of developers support Apple's iOS, 90% are single-platform

post #1 of 97
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The iOS mobile operating system for the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad remains the dominant platform for developers, most of which write exclusively for Apple's devices.

Advertising agency Millennial Media's Mobile Mix survey for May 2010 found that 56 percent of U.S. developers write software for Apple's iOS. That's nearly double the next-largest platform, Google's Android. 5 percent write for Nokia's Symbian, while 4 percent create software for Research in Motion's BlackBerry devices.

And while Apple has the lion's share of developers, the study also suggests that those developers are exclusive to Apple. Among all U.S. developers in May, 90 percent were single platform, while just 10 percent wrote mobile applications for multiple platforms.

Millennial Media says that its advertisements reach 82 percent of the mobile Web, according to Nelson, with 59.6 million users. The company is the largest independent mobile advertising network, following Google's acquisition of AdMob.

Other details revealed in the latest Mobile Mix report:

Requests for the Apple iPad on Millennial Media's network grew 160 percent month-over-month.

Apple remains the top mobile device maker, with a 25.4 percent share among all manufacturers. However, that was a decrease of nearly 10 percent form the April figures. iOS still has 46 percent share among smartphones alone on the company's network.

Google's Android has grown 338 percent since January. Ad requests for Android increased 15 percent month-over-month in May.

Research in Motion is the second-largest mobile operating system on the company's network. RIM had five devices in the top 20 mobile phones, lead by the BlackBerry Curve which represented 7.92 percent of traffic in May.

Despite what have been reported as lackluster sales, Google's Nexus One was the third most popular smartphone on Millennial Media's network. In May it accounted for 3.94 percent of all mobile phones.


In April, Millennial Media revealed that 70 percent of its smartphone traffic for ad impressions was consumed by the iPhone in the month of March.
post #2 of 97
More good news for iOS developers.

Analyst: iPhone 4 Launch a 2 Million-3 Million iPhone Event

http://digitaldaily.allthingsd.com/2...-iphone-event/
post #3 of 97
...are pondering if Google, with it's ad driving can leverage the Android install base to generate higher than normal hits. That is to say, could they "game the system" with Android - giving them a perceived higher share of ad requests? I ask because they are ad-revenue driven, and these stats are critical to their success, reflecting their influence in the marketplace. I'm not saying they do, or would. Just could they?

post #4 of 97
If I were a developer (I'm not), I would spend my time developing applications where I can make $$$$.
I would spend my time developing applications where the customers I target have $$$$
I would spend my time developing applications where I don't need to worry or invest in distribution or how to get paid.

Even IF Android takes off, their customer-base/marketplace have a different mentality.
It's more of a "home grown, do it yourself" mentality, and where can I get it for free. Also, the Google marketplace seems obscure and riddled with issues (today, anyway)

Don't get me wrong, Free will always be king, BUT well written, well designed, useful applications, should command $ca-ching$, and today, that $ca-ching$ is with the iPhone/iPad/iPod-Touch customer base.

AND
with the mature Apple App Store.
post #5 of 97
Does not surprise me at all and even with Microsoft's so-called inducements to develop for Win 7 Mobile I don't expect much to change. iOS is a lucrative albeit competitive platform.
post #6 of 97
the numbers are hardly surprising, given apple's dominance currently with mobile apps, and usually if you put the kind f resources into a mobile app for iphone, you aren't as likely to do it again for the smaller markets.
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post #7 of 97
The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.
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post #8 of 97
So 56% of developers (article title), or 56% of U.S. developers (article content)? That's quite a difference, don't you think?
post #9 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuffyzDead View Post

...today, that $ca-ching$ is with the iPhone/iPad/iPod-Touch...

I agree that the place to be is with the iOS today (and the future) but you should also realize that it can take many attempts for a developer to even make enough to pay for it as a hobby much less a full time vocation.

I think that the iPad has helped since there tend to be more apps that support pricing that makes sense. As a developer it is hard to do much in the way of improvements, support, new releases with the current price structure. I hope the 'everything for a dollar' era will soon come to a close and we will see more software priced at a point that will support a couple guys that don;t have millions to put into development and marketing. I would like to see more apps in the $3 to $5 range and let the simple $1 stuff fade to a small percentage.



Just my 2 cents (even cheaper than the app store).
post #10 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

This is just absolute nonsense. You clearly have no understanding at all of what is "anticompetitive" behaviour in this case.

"Lock-in" of developers, implies that they are not allowed to develop for other platforms when this is simply not true.

There are not only no laws against what Apple is doing, they are doing the exact same thing that many other players have done in the past. The whole idea that this is somehow "anticompetitive" is just faulty. You've been reading too much press or watching to much Fox news or something.

Also, the FTC investigates when a competitor complains. The fact that they are investigating means nothing except that one of Apple's competitors complained to the FTC.
post #11 of 97
Classic web advertising hit statistics will skew increasingly away from iOS. Recall that Steve Jobs said iOS users don't use search, they use apps. Those apps extract information from the web while bypassing ads. So iOS users become increasingly invisible to AdMob/Google. Don't for a moment confuse that with not being there.

This is Google's nightmare, targeted iOS apps that get people the information that they want without generating a penny of ad revenue for them. They are not a search company, they are an ad company.

It'll be hard to track these statistics until we can get a measure of where the advertising dollars are going. If Apple makes iAd revenues visible in the balance sheet, we may get a handle on this.
post #12 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

If Google was able to use Apple's future ad service (iAd) as proof of competition and Microsoft many years ago sited the Mac as competition for Windows (when Apple was gasping for life) then there should be no concern.
post #13 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

It's always say exactly the opposite what I'm thinking. Funny that.
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post #14 of 97
And the crazy part is that most of these studies underestimate the lead the iOS has, for 2 reasons:

1) Almost no one pays for apps on Android. Almost every app is ad-supported, unlike the iOS, where a much larger percentage are ad-free paid for apps.

2) This does not account for international, where iOS devices compete directly with Android (i.e., aren't locked to a carrier with about 1/3rd marketshare). iOS is killing Android internationally. I don't think anyone even really cares/knows what Android is outside the us.
post #15 of 97
Quote:
The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

This is not close to being true. The problem is people keep comparing the App Store to some mythical business model they would like to see. In reality the App Store is best compared to Video Game console online markets, which are completely curated, and the only way to get onto the console (i.e., outside selling discs, which is even more curated, and costs a TON more money).

If Apple is accused of anti-competitive behavior, expect Nintendo's stock price to plummet, since they have a much bigger marketshare with the Wii, and their policies are far more draconian and closed. They also don't have an HTML5 open alternative.

All this investigation behavior is nothing more than Google's rapidly increasing lobbying dollars speaking. All bluster and no action.
post #16 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobrik View Post

So 56% of developers (article title), or 56% of U.S. developers (article content)? That's quite a difference, don't you think?

It's even stupider than that.

56% of U.S. SMARTPHONE developers support Apple's iOS.

Of THAT number, 90% are single-platform.

But another way of looking at those numbers is just that freelance developers prefer to develop for a marketplace where it's easy for them to sell their apps?
In other words, it's not the phone, it's the store. Apple has created an easy way for developers to get their apps to lots of people.
post #17 of 97
I'm confused. I thought developers were leaving Apple's locked down, closed, walled garden prison for the "anything goes" greener pastures of Android. What gives?
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post #18 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

That's a completely ignorant statement to make. Developers are not "locked in " to the iPhone. They can develop for any platform they choose. They CHOOSE to develop for the iPhone, a majority of them exclusively it seems, because they make good money doing it.

What your statement shows, however, is that very few people understand the concept of anti-competitive behavior. Anti-competitive behavior would be along the lines of Apple requiring developers to sign an agreement not to develop for any other platform in order for them to get their apps in the store. They don't and a developer can produce apps for iPhone, Android, Palm, whoever. Most CHOOSE to develop for the iPhone. This is not anti-competitive or a lock-in by any logic what-so-ever.

Man the FUD some people spew!
post #19 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I'm confused. I thought developers were leaving Apple's locked down, closed, walled garden prison for the "anything goes" greener pastures of Android. What gives?

That is an Apple hating troll wet dream. And Apple hating trolls don't live in the real world anyway.
post #20 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

Anti-competitive behavior? What, specifically?

We are not seeing Apple use their market position to prevent developers from working on or porting to other platforms. They're merely saying, "If you want to develop for this device, here are the tools and the rules." If you want to develop for any console device, you encounter the same situation.
post #21 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.

The FTC's case for anticompetitive behavior is becoming stronger every day, sadly.

WTF are you going on about again?

Your insane jealousy and frustration is showing.

Developers are CHOOSING Apple.
post #22 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

WTF are you going on about again?

Your insane jealousy and frustration is showing.

Developers are CHOOSING Apple.

Let me ask you this: If a developer was told his code could easily run on other platforms besides iOS, with MILD work associated, do you think they would all say no? Of course not. That's what he's talking about. I think it's a good idea for Apple to force their developers to use code that works the best for iOS, but if it turns out it's illegal in some way, what can you do?

For instance, with Java, you can theoretically create an application that runs on any platform supporting Java, but doing this adds a lot to the project's size, and since it's gotta be the most straight forward way to do things in Java, the software can be sluggish for it.

It really comes down to there not being a language that runs great on every platform, and that's why Apple doesn't want code that can just as easily run on Android as iOS. Again, whether this is illegal I don't know, but that other dude seems pretty confident it is.
post #23 of 97
I'm confused, did the members who are berating me on this forum forget that Apple has a clause in its developer agreement that you're not allowed to develop using third-party tools and that you must only use Apple-approved languages? That pretty much excludes all developers who want to develop broadly for multiple platforms, locking developers into Apple's platform because of cost considerations.

Stop putting your fingers in your ears and shouting "la-la-la-la-la" hoping that the anticompetitive actions by Apple are magically going to go away.
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post #24 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The bad news is that this is more fuel for the fire for the FTC. More reasons why Apple's lock-in of developers will be hurting the mobile app market.(

Where's the lock-in? If you'd read the article, the developers are free to develop for other platforms, they just CHOOSE not to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

And the crazy part is that most of these studies underestimate the lead the iOS has, for 2 reasons:

1) Almost no one pays for apps on Android. Almost every app is ad-supported, unlike the iOS, where a much larger percentage are ad-free paid for apps.

2) This does not account for international, where iOS devices compete directly with Android (i.e., aren't locked to a carrier with about 1/3rd marketshare). iOS is killing Android internationally. I don't think anyone even really cares/knows what Android is outside the us.

3. The quality of developers is different. A lot of Android developers were first rejected from the Apple Store because their apps were not good enough. That drags down the average quality on Android. Furthermore, developers for iPhone are far likelier to make money, so they can afford to put in the time to polish their apps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm confused, did the members who are berating me on this forum forget that Apple has a clause in its developer agreement that you're not allowed to develop using third-party tools and that you must only use Apple-approved languages? That pretty much excludes all developers who want to develop broadly for multiple platforms, locking developers into Apple's platform because of cost considerations.

It doesn't do any such thing. It simply says that if the developer wants to develop for different platforms, they should use tools appropriate for those platforms. Basically, it's making life difficult for lazy developers, but there's no law saying Apple has to make life easy for lazy developers.
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post #25 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm confused, did the members who are berating me on this forum forget that Apple has a clause in its developer agreement that you're not allowed to develop using third-party tools and that you must only use Apple-approved languages? That pretty much excludes all developers who want to develop broadly for multiple platforms, locking developers into Apple's platform because of cost considerations.

Stop putting your fingers in your ears and shouting "la-la-la-la-la" hoping that the anticompetitive actions by Apple are magically going to go away.

I doubt it's that serious. Android came out a year later than iPhone, and it pretty much proves that the mobile phone market is strong and thriving given how strong it's become. Unless they can point to some actual anti-competitive behavior other than 'I hate Apple', it's unlikely to go anywhere given the healthy market.
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post #26 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It doesn't do any such thing. It simply says that if the developer wants to develop for different platforms, they should use tools appropriate for those platforms. Basically, it's making life difficult for lazy developers, but there's no law saying Apple has to make life easy for lazy developers.

Wow! I can't believe g3pro could twist that part about the developer's agreement around. He deserves a raise from whatever troll factory is employing him to work here.
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post #27 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm confused, did the members who are berating me on this forum forget that Apple has a clause in its developer agreement that you're not allowed to develop using third-party tools and that you must only use Apple-approved languages? That pretty much excludes all developers who want to develop broadly for multiple platforms, locking developers into Apple's platform because of cost considerations.

Stop putting your fingers in your ears and shouting "la-la-la-la-la" hoping that the anticompetitive actions by Apple are magically going to go away.

Yes you are confused. If you're developing for iOS then Apple requires that you use Apple approved languages ObjC, C, etc. No where does their policy say you cannot develop for other platforms. If you want to develop for other platforms, you can go ahead and do so. I agree that you can't do much with ObjC on other mobile platforms, but if you want a piece of the Apple pie then that's the price of entry. But there is no "lock-in". When I develop for the iPhone, I use ObjC. When I develop for Android I use Java. Stop the whinning and Just do it!
post #28 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm confused, did the members who are berating me on this forum forget that Apple has a clause in its developer agreement that you're not allowed to develop using third-party tools and that you must only use Apple-approved languages? That pretty much excludes all developers who want to develop broadly for multiple platforms, locking developers into Apple's platform because of cost considerations.

Stop putting your fingers in your ears and shouting "la-la-la-la-la" hoping that the anticompetitive actions by Apple are magically going to go away.

You should take off your blinders. Apple is only trying to insure that apps written for their products will run on today's iOS as well as future versions of their iOS as well without breaking or major re-writes being necessary. No developer is being forced to write for iOS they are choosing to do so.
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post #29 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm confused, did the members who are berating me on this forum forget that Apple has a clause in its developer agreement that you're not allowed to develop using third-party tools and that you must only use Apple-approved languages? That pretty much excludes all developers who want to develop broadly for multiple platforms, locking developers into Apple's platform because of cost considerations.

Stop putting your fingers in your ears and shouting "la-la-la-la-la" hoping that the anticompetitive actions by Apple are magically going to go away.


Damn it. When will Google and Symbian remove the restrictions on how to develop for their platforms so I can use my proven Obj-C code???? What Android doesn't honor is my desire not to be madatorily subject to a managed memory model and lots of easily reverse engineer-able Java+XML. 15 minutes with a package snooper, a reflection mirror, and an Android app in the simulator and I could have my app duplicated by someone else if they really wanted to (at least the important functionality mapped and documented). A curse of having to write in Java on an open JVM.

Why isn't it as important for my developing rights to be protected by ALL platforms having to play by the rules the Android/Flash crowd wants Apple to play by.

So who gets to preemptively choose the winner, via legal regulation, in a cross platform coding standard? Why should anyone get to anoint a single company as the beneficiary of a totally one sided rule, which it what it turns into when you stop to think about what I wrote above. It's not financially possible to do all languages on all platforms, the capability does not exist at a price any human is willing to pay today. Unless the regulation is completely platform neutral, making all development platforms mandatory on all platforms, all you have is the government arbitrarily choosing a technology winner who gets to rake in all the dough. That's not effective from either a tech or legal standpoint.

The device manufacturer makes the risky call when they make the device then the market, both devs and the consumers that buy the devs apps, get to choose what technology tree made the right choices. It's really that simple.
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post #30 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllNamesAreTaken View Post

Anti-competitive behavior? What, specifically?

We are not seeing Apple use their market position to prevent developers from working on or porting to other platforms. They're merely saying, "If you want to develop for this device, here are the tools and the rules." If you want to develop for any console device, you encounter the same situation.

Well, last week they weren't allowing porn. This week they're not allowing apps with desktop functionality. Then they ban a cartoonist, but accept him only after he wins a Pulitzer prize. Then they ban Ulysses (Joyce) and Oscar Wilde, but after a rukus on the web, accept them.

It's a totally capricious acceptance system with random undisclosed rules that change weekly and have dozens of special exceptions (Playboy is OK?!).

What sane developer would want to develop under those rules?
post #31 of 97
Ok, so the main point of the original article is that 90% of iFart developers are iOS only?

Well, no kidding. They couldn't program themselves out of a paper bag, and supporting Objective C and Java/Android is over their head.

They "program" by asking questions on StackOverflow.com and copying and pasting the answers.

I used to be iOS only, but after Apple sat on one of my apps because it links to sites that are too risqué for Apple's reviewers, I'm now an Apple/Android shop.
post #32 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bikertwin View Post

Well, last week they weren't allowing porn. This week they're not allowing apps with desktop functionality. Then they ban a cartoonist, but accept him only after he wins a Pulitzer prize. Then they ban Ulysses (Joyce) and Oscar Wilde, but after a rukus on the web, accept them.

It's a totally capricious acceptance system with random undisclosed rules that change weekly and have dozens of special exceptions (Playboy is OK?!).

What sane developer would want to develop under those rules?

The vast majority, apparently.

BTW, the rules are not as arbitrary as you are claiming.

The first rule is that the app must work. IIRC, Apple stated that about 20-30% of submissions failed this rule so the app was rejected - and is probably now available at the Android store.

The second rule is that it must be a native app - because it is well established that native apps are going to work better than emulated garbage, particularly in a low-resource environment like the iPhone. Again, the emulated crap is now available at the Android store.

The third rule is 'no porn or offensive stuff'. Granted, there IS a small amount of subjectivity to this around the edges. The obvious porn was rejected. If you really must have it and can't figure out how to use a web browser, it's at the Android store. There are a few items on the fringes of "what is art and what is pornography". Not surprisingly, there is disagreement on where some items fall (such as the Ulysses comic book -which is an inane idea in the first place, btw). But there is an appeals process and most of the widely publicized ones have been approved (Ulysses, the political caricatures, etc). Seems that the process is working.

Apple has made the decision to at least try to limit the App Store to good apps. They're not perfect and there will be mistakes any time you're evaluating hundreds of thousands of apps, but the review process catches most of those. Frankly, this is one of the ways that Apple customers differ from non-Apple customers. We expect things to work and work well, while you are apparently content with having 50% of what you buy be junk. Apple is catering to their target audience - and building a great user experience. The fact that a few marginal developers might get their feelings hurt or have to do a little more work is and acceptable cost.

Oh, and as I've pointed out, many of the apps that aren't good enough for the Apple store are now in the Android store - which greatly inflates the Android numbers, but at the expense of quality.
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post #33 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

The vast majority, apparently.

BTW, the rules are not as arbitrary as you are claiming.

The first rule is that the app must work. IIRC, Apple stated that about 20-30% of submissions failed this rule so the app was rejected - and is probably now available at the Android store.

The second rule is that it must be a native app - because it is well established that native apps are going to work better than emulated garbage, particularly in a low-resource environment like the iPhone. Again, the emulated crap is now available at the Android store.

The third rule is 'no porn or offensive stuff'. Granted, there IS a small amount of subjectivity to this around the edges. The obvious porn was rejected. If you really must have it and can't figure out how to use a web browser, it's at the Android store. There are a few items on the fringes of "what is art and what is pornography". Not surprisingly, there is disagreement on where some items fall (such as the Ulysses comic book -which is an inane idea in the first place, btw). But there is an appeals process and most of the widely publicized ones have been approved (Ulysses, the political caricatures, etc). Seems that the process is working.

Apple has made the decision to at least try to limit the App Store to good apps. They're not perfect and there will be mistakes any time you're evaluating hundreds of thousands of apps, but the review process catches most of those. Frankly, this is one of the ways that Apple customers differ from non-Apple customers. We expect things to work and work well, while you are apparently content with having 50% of what you buy be junk. Apple is catering to their target audience - and building a great user experience. The fact that a few marginal developers might get their feelings hurt or have to do a little more work is and acceptable cost.

Oh, and as I've pointed out, many of the apps that aren't good enough for the Apple store are now in the Android store - which greatly inflates the Android numbers, but at the expense of quality.

Apple can and should vet apps for HIG compliance, not crashing, and taking proper advantage of the platform (i.e., not emulated). That makes for a quality user experience. Agreed.

What Apple should *not* do is vet apps for content--whether it's farts, news, poetry, knitting, political, or porn. (unless, of course, it's illegal).

Would Apple have rejected Jesus' or Mohammed's or Moses' or Martin Luther
King's teachings in their time because they were unpopular? Would Playboy have been banned before it became so popular?

Apple should not regulate content unless they allow other app stores.
post #34 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Advertising agency Millennial Media's Mobile Mix survey for May 2010 found that 56 percent of U.S. developers write software for Apple's iOS. That's nearly double the next-largest platform, Google's Android. 5 percent write for Nokia's Symbian, while 4 percent create software for Research in Motion's .

The statistic is suspect. It must be a percent of Smart Phone developers... Not ALL developers.
post #35 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dorotea View Post

The statistic is suspect. It must be a percent of Smart Phone developers... Not ALL developers.

That's exactly what it is. Check out their name and website.
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post #36 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bikertwin View Post

Apple can and should vet apps for HIG compliance, not crashing, and taking proper advantage of the platform (i.e., not emulated). That makes for a quality user experience. Agreed.

What Apple should *not* do is vet apps for content--whether it's farts, news, poetry, knitting, political, or porn. (unless, of course, it's illegal).

Would Apple have rejected Jesus' or Mohammed's or Moses' or Martin Luther
King's teachings in their time because they were unpopular? Would Playboy have been banned before it became so popular?

Apple should not regulate content unless they allow other app stores.

Go start your own app store then. Make your own phone and infrastructure.

Who give YOU the right to specify what Apple should or shouldn't do? Apple has millions of happy customers and a very successful business model. The way the process works is that Apple decides what to offer. If enough people like Apple's offering, they stay in business and thrive. If Apple's offering is unpopular, Apple fails.

Arbitrary demands of what they should or shouldn't publish don't make any sense - they simply make you look like a whining juvenile.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #37 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobrik View Post

So 56% of developers (article title), or 56% of U.S. developers (article content)? That's quite a difference, don't you think?

Of course. And if you go deeper, the population again drops dramatically:

"And while Apple has the lion's share of developers, the study also suggests that those developers are exclusive to Apple. Among all U.S. developers in May, 90 percent were single platform, while just 10 percent wrote mobile applications for multiple platforms.:


So far from being 56% of developers, or even 56% of "all US developers", it seems to be "56% of American mobile application developers".
post #38 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

they are doing the exact same thing that many other players have done in the past. The whole idea that this is somehow "anticompetitive" is just faulty.

What they are doing is certainly anti-competitive, just like those others that you mentioned.

But that is not the question. The question is whether it is illegal.
post #39 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

If Apple is accused of anti-competitive behavior, expect Nintendo's stock price to plummet, since they have a much bigger marketshare with the Wii, and their policies are far more draconian and closed.


Are you talking hardware, software or something else when you say "marketshare"?
post #40 of 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

I'm confused. I thought developers were leaving Apple's locked down, closed, walled garden prison for the "anything goes" greener pastures of Android. What gives?

I think you are remembering that several high-profile developers of good software left the platform. It was a significant series of defections.

But that was just a relatively small number of excellent developers.
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