or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › First look: Apple' new unibody Mac mini
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

First look: Apple' new unibody Mac mini - Page 2

post #41 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post

It boggles the mind that many think the Mac Mini is way too expensive yet the iMac, which is a very poor deal looked at over the long haul, not so much. As I've noted before, it's 12-year monitor technology mated to six-year computer technology. To me that doesn't add up. Either one maintains the computer, including costly software updates and periodic hard-drive replacements, or throws away a perfectly good monitor roughly half way through that monitor's life cycle.

Makes a lot more sense to buy a separate monitor that can soldier on mated to a succession of computers, as happened with my previous monitor. Since buying my first Mac back in the 1990s, I've owned two monitors, a 17" Sony CRT and now a 24" Cinema Display (briefly used a Sony LCD but I'm using that as my main TV so it really doesn't count). In that time I've owned a 7200, a G4 Tower, and am now on my third Mini, trading in my last one for nearly half of what I bought it for new. Being as the Cinema Display is only a few months old, I expect that 10 years from now I might still be using that same display though the Mini I'm typing this on will be long gone.

Let's not forget that when you buy a Mac, you're not just buying a computer. The iLife software package alone retails for $99 here in Canada. The OS is another $35, which is a huge bargain compared to Windows 7. So right off the bat you can take $134 off the base price of the Mini, which lists in base form for $749 here in Canada. That lowers the price to $615 which seems to me to be not at all outrageous for a nicely engineered piece of electronic gear. I paid more for my first CD burner back in the day. You could run the thing for a couple of years and get roughly have that back in trade. Try doing that with a piece of cheap PC junk.

Turn over the Mini every couple of years and the cost, which would be around $500 after trade (taxes included), would include not having to worry about replacing a worn out hard drive as well as maintaining current iLife and OS software. That last item alone is worth roughly half the $500 you're paying. If someone had told me a few years ago that there would come a time when the annual cost of never having a computer much older than two years old would run something like $125, I'd have thought they were completely mad. That would be the equivalent of buying a $1,250 computer once a decade. I paid six times that amount in Cdn. currency for my G4 DP 500 alone, factoring in a memory and GPU upgrade along the way.

I don't doubt that there are products that could easily outspec the Mini at that price point but specs are becoming increasingly insignificant. The Mini as it sits is plenty fast, in absolute terms a very capable performer. That will continue to improve with each revision. Within the next three or four years I imagine a quad-core Mini will be a given and 4GB of RAM definitely the basest of starting points. GPU horsepower, already quite good, will be that much better.

And don't forget that the beauty of using more established technology is that it will be reliable, well-tested technology. That's one reason why Minis are quite reliable.

Thank God the rumours of the Mini's demise were greatly exaggerated. It's a good package and contrary to what many think, offers decent bang for the buck.

+1 nice post
post #42 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Champ View Post

How you feel about things outside of yourself usually reflects how you view yourself.
just sayin

sigh. i guess you got me champ. you win the grade school stuff.

getting back to the actual point of the post. it reminds me of what they did with the 1st gen unibody macbook pros where the mini-dp was positioned to the right of the usb ports simply because it looked really pretty to have all of the ports descending in size from left to right (and yeah, it did look really pretty). what nobody realised is that min-dp cable would be running backwards away from the machine, totally blocking access to the 2 usb ports. clever.

obviously they received enough complaints about this for them to switch it in the later revisions.

Apple are great, i love their stuff, i buy it. But they're not perfect. they do dumb things. and the dumb things are often "form over function" type stuff.

putting stuff that you will need to access from time to time on the back of a device that is clearly intended to sit in a home entertainment unit (for a signficant proportion of users) is a dumb decision.

it makes me a little sad to say it, but unfortunately it's true.
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
Reply
15" uMacbook Pro 2.4Ghz 8GB 128GB SSD/500GB 7200rpm, iMac 27" i5 16GB 1TB, MacBook Air 8GB 256GB, iPhone 5s 64GB, iPhone 4 32GB, iPad 4 64GB, Apple TV2/3, iPod Nano 2nd gen, iPod Touch 4th gen,...
Reply
post #43 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

This one says it supports audio.

It may be real, but I wouldn't trust that listing. There are plenty such adapters on Amazon that list having Audio with many posting that it doesn't AND they have one of the correct Macs.

it did get me to find an Apple authorized mDP-to-HDMI adapter that does support audio. Of course, it's pricer than even their Apple-branded adapters. I'll get one just in case, but only from Monoprice as I really don't need it and I'm not willing to spend over $10 for it.
http://store.apple.com/us/product/H1...co=MTgxNDQ3NDc
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #44 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Yes, way to expensive now, in the UK you get the 21.5" iMac for just £250 more, honeslty who would buy this machine when you get double the ram, a better cpu/gpu, KB & Mouse and screen for that little bit more.

Who would buy this machine? People who need a matte screen, but not the horsepower or expense of a MacPro.

Now, the new mini IS overpriced and I wouldn't even consider it IF Apple OFFERED THE IMAC IN MATTE. There's no reason Apple can't at least offer a BTO option....
post #45 of 240
Love the look and features of the new mac mini. Considered buying one (or two?) for my kids until I saw that price. They can live with their Eee Box a little longer.
post #46 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

...I have to think Apple knows it's consumer base better than we do.

No, they don't. If Apple did, they would sell far more computers than any other manufacturer. Fact is they still offer quite poor value for money simply because Mr. Jobs cannot bear the thought of plebs or peasants as Dow Chemical, Procter & Gamble, Wal-Mart and the like, prefer to call people in the lower income bracket.
post #47 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by ameldrum1 View Post

sigh. i guess you got me champ. you win the grade school stuff.

getting back to the actual point of the post. it reminds me of what they did with the 1st gen unibody macbook pros where the mini-dp was positioned to the right of the usb ports simply because it looked really pretty to have all of the ports descending in size from left to right (and yeah, it did look really pretty). what nobody realised is that min-dp cable would be running backwards away from the machine, totally blocking access to the 2 usb ports. clever.

obviously they received enough complaints about this for them to switch it in the later revisions.

Apple are great, i love their stuff, i buy it. But they're not perfect. they do dumb things. and the dumb things are often "form over function" type stuff.

putting stuff that you will need to access from time to time on the back of a device that is clearly intended to sit in a home entertainment unit (for a signficant proportion of users) is a dumb decision.it makes me a little sad to say it, but unfortunately it's true.

Calm down, just giving you a hard time.But I do think your gripes are quite silly. I have a mac mini and it does sit on my entertainment center. When I turn it on (which is quite rare because I don't turn it off that often) it's a pretty easy endeavor. I imagine the sd slot will be painless as well. So are you saying you would prefer all the cables hanging from the front?
post #48 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

And what if this new milling process is part of their long term plan and it's 1) very expensive right now because it's having to work inside of a closed shell, or 2) makes it so they can currently only produce a fraction of the models they could for old style Mac Mini? Both of those are reasons to have a higher price point.

Profit margins are not some static entity. They are designed with the market demand in mind. Anything else is just bad business, unless it's done during a civil emergency for a required commodity in which the seller is breaking the law*.

* Please don't argue that the Mac MIni is price gouging because people should be able to have an affordable Mac.

I am not arguing the Mac mini is not value for money. It looks a well designed and well built product. However, its original objective was to be an easy way for Windows users, who maybe have started using Apple products such as the iPod, to switch to using Macs. The Mac mini didn't even come with a keyboard or mouse so they could keep costs down. Even if a new milled case and better specs justify the cost (and maybe they do), adding an extra $100 to the base price makes it much less likely existing Windows users will now consider a Mac. In addition, Windows 7 had a pretty successful launch without all the negativity Vista received and the Get a Mac commercials have ended. I have to wonder if Apple has given up trying to bring new users to the Mac and is instead focusing purely on iOS devices for future growth?
post #49 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bloodshotrollin'red View Post

No, they don't. If Apple did, they would sell far more computers than any other manufacturer. Fact is they still offer quite poor value for money simply because Mr. Jobs cannot bear the thought of plebs or peasants as Dow Chemical, Procter & Gamble, Wal-Mart and the like, prefer to call people in the lower income bracket.

Are you sure Apple's in the business of selling MORE computers than anyone else? If you think so then you might want to tell them that since their focus seems to be to make more money than anyone else.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #50 of 240
By jacking up the price, Apple has made the mini a lot less attractive. Are they getting greedy? Do they really need high margins on this thing? The mini is about cost effectiveness. Its supposed to be a low cost way to get you into the Apple camp... But at $700? Come on, I can get an iMac for just a little more. Even if they want to pitch this as a media center, its overpriced. For example,
you can get a BD player with Netflix streaming for under $200. The Boxee Box is probably going to be around $200. A PS3 box which plays BlueRay disks and does Netflix is under $500.
So, what are they thinking?

Hmmm, remember the Cube?

post #51 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

Exactly. I read a quote from Apple on macworld.co.uk concerning the SD card slot on the back, along the lines of "the size of the Mini constrains where we can put ports" as if that was an adequate excuse. Who exactly held the gun to Apple's head and forced them to make the Mini the height that it is?

The beginnings of the design process should have been:
  • Optical drive slot, SD card slot, 3.5 mm audio in and out jacks on front (possibly audio in/out on side)
  • Same footprint as AppleTV
  • Now, what's the minimum height we can make it to satisfy our design goals?

But no, overlord Steve wants everything to be as thin as possible, even if that means compromising usability and even if it's a bloody desktop machine!

My instincts tell me that they never even considered adding the slot on the front or having a USB on the front either. That goes against their design ethos as the other consumer level stuff has nothing on the front other than indicator lights. Apple is as Apple does.
Crying? No, I am not crying. I am sweating through my eyes.
Reply
Crying? No, I am not crying. I am sweating through my eyes.
Reply
post #52 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

I am not arguing the Mac mini is not value for money. It looks a well designed and well built product. However, its original objective was to be an easy way for Windows users, who maybe have started using Apple products such as the iPod, to switch to using Macs. The Mac mini didn't even come with a keyboard or mouse so they could keep costs down. Even if a new milled case and better specs justify the cost (and maybe they do), adding an extra $100 to the base price makes it much less likely existing Windows users will now consider a Mac. In addition, Windows 7 had a pretty successful launch without all the negativity Vista received and the Get a Mac commercials have ended. I have to wonder if Apple has given up trying to bring new users to the Mac and is instead focusing purely on iOS devices for future growth?

Maybe they switched their focus for the device. I really have no idea but the least likely reason seems to be that they have made a huge mistake and have no idea who buys the Mac Mini.

I'm analyzed the frak out of this machine. It's not just about the mid-2010 Mac MIni. You also have to consider their plans for the future of the Mac Mini. They have a road map for it and it seems to me that C2D can't withstand more than two (and maybe just one) more upgrade. That means Core-i + Intel HD as there is no room for a dGPU, its fan and the PSU is probably not powerful enough as is. They could remove the optical drive to make the needed room. Or they could switch to AMD+ATI for these smaller machines.

One thing seems certain, they designed this case and went through the trouble of milling it from a solid piece of aluminium not for some single release product. It will be with us for quite awhile, I imagine.

PS: It's just a joke, but have you seen my sig.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #53 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



Regardless of the future of Apple TV, the Mac mini offers a more powerful features, including support for DVR software (providing TiVo-like functionality)

Can a Mac Mini really provide TiVo-like functionality? Does it have a tuner card?

If not, how does that work? How does it get TV input to record on the hard drive?
post #54 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

Yes, way to expensive now, in the UK you get the 21.5" iMac for just £250 more, honeslty who would buy this machine when you get double the ram, a better cpu/gpu, KB & Mouse and screen for that little bit more.

Such a shame, it's beautiful but priced by a retard I think, either that or Apple assumes its customers are stupid!

I don't think many Mini customers know anything about RAM, the CPU or the GPU. If they already have a computer, they already have the peripherals.
post #55 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdkennedy1 View Post

I could never justify buying it. It's underpowered for the price.

Then get the server model.
post #56 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

I don't think many Mini customers know anything about RAM, the CPU or the GPU. If they already have a computer, they already have the peripherals.

That's a salient point. These specs only seem to matter to us. Everyone else seems to only care about not fast enough and fast enough.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #57 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiggin View Post

And remember, the original PowerPC mini was only $499. The switch to Intel added $100 to the base price and now they've tacked on another $100. So a 40% increase in what, 5 years?

Bad Apple!

Their stock price has climbed greatly during that period of time.
post #58 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

Even if most people bought the more expensive option, having a cheap base version is good for marketing purposes. "From $499" sounds a lot better than "From $699" even if the majority of folks immediately opt for the faster CPU and more memory and actually pay closer to $699.

Also $699 and you have to provide your own keyboard, mouse and monitor. You are probably better off buying a Macbook.


Apple doesn't go for the el-cheapo market. Apple doesn't know how to make a good $499 computer.

And if the Mini isn't for you, Apple can sell you a different Mac. Problem solved.
post #59 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post

At this price, It should have a blu-ray drive.

So it seems. However, a really good BluRay player cost several hundreds of dollars. Adding a BluRay drive to the Mini would work, but the video output quality would surely be lacking. No room for the necessary processing video chips.
post #60 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamG View Post

Their stock price has climbed greatly during that period of time.

But that is primarily due to their phone business, not their computer business.


Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

PS: It's just a joke, but have you seen my sig.

Saw it. Liked it. But it does have the ring of truth about it. I wonder how long it is before OS-X is just for power users?


BTW it is possible the case design (maybe different height versions) is also intended for future AppleTVs and Timed Capsules as well as the Mac Mini.
post #61 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamG View Post

Apple doesn't go for the el-cheapo market.

And by putting up the price by $100 they are making that abundantly clear to everyone.

Quote:
And if the Mini isn't for you, Apple can sell you a different Mac. Problem solved.

Or more likely people will stick with Windows.
post #62 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevie View Post

Can a Mac Mini really provide TiVo-like functionality? Does it have a tuner card?

If not, how does that work? How does it get TV input to record on the hard drive?

Could use Elgato HD etc. and plug it in by USB
post #63 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by maridia View Post

I think the design is marvelous. The price, not so much. I'm on the verge of getting one of these things, but just can't make up my mind.

Just get it. The price will soon be forgotten.
post #64 of 240
.....
post #65 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

But that is primarily due to their phone business, not their computer business.

Saw it. Liked it. But it does have the ring of truth about it. I wonder how long it is before OS-X is just for power users?

I don't think it does when you stop comparing Macs to the iPhone. Just like with your comment (above) to WilliamG, the stock is mostly being affected by the iPhone. It's been wildly successful but I think the Macs are the best they have ever produced. They have gone to an expensive milling process for nearly the entire line which means they have perfected it in ways I didn't think were possible for a CE company pushing that much volume. If they were going to ignore the Mac I don't think they would have bothered.

Also, they are selling more Macs in a quarter than they used to sell in a year just a few years ago. This is big! To lose Macs means to lose a key part of the Apple ecosystem and a large part of their revenue stream.

Last and most important, they appear to make considerably more profit than any other PC vendor. Just because they made the smartphone business a consumer success despite all the talk of it being so "entrenched" doesn't mean that they should drop it. It's not a one-or-the-other situation. They can and will focus on both market segments.

Quote:
BTW it is possible the case design (maybe different height versions) is also intended for future AppleTVs and Timed Capsules as well as the Mac Mini.

Nice idea. I'd like to see how the antenna are working with that all aluminium design. I think we're getting to the point were routers need to have a more robust OS and they need to be more powerful. Between 802.11n, double band routers, 1000BASE-T, USB3.0 and the speed of FIOS and DOCSIS3.0 cable modems todays consumer routers cannot handle the load if there are multiple users on the LAN taxing it. With the growing number of HD content and other data-heavy services this is becoming more common. So I wouldn't be surprised to see a Time Capsule wiith an A4 chip with a 3.5" HDD and running iOS sans the Cocoa Touch layer.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #66 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

But that is primarily due to their phone business, not their computer business.


Bingo. You know that they are no longer primarily a computer company.
post #67 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walney View Post

...or else maybe Mr. H has a very valid point. If they had kept the case dimensions pretty much the same Apple would have an inch of fresh air to play with. So there would have been room for an uprated PSU, separate GPU and enough fresh air to ensure adequate cooling.

If they made it even bigger they could have also made the chips user removable so you can upgrade more easily, they could have reduced costs even further, they could forego using notebook-grade components for cheaper and faster desktop-grade components, they could used a plastic case that is even cheaper than their old white one, et cetera ad nauseum.

That's were you're missing the point. Apple knows what they could have done, but you all need to accept what they have done. It doesn't suit your needs and that's that. There is nothing else to discuss about how the product coulda would shoulda.

If you care to make predictions as to how you think the product will fair in the market and why you think it was the wrong way to go, that's fine. That's can lead to worthwhile discussion. But stating that they could do more for less with a larger case design means you are missing the point.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #68 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post


Or more likely people will stick with Windows.


Naw. People who go to the Apple store to replace their windows machine are likely going to buy a Mac. They have already heard something about Apple being expensive, and they are already primed for the "better quality" shtick to overcome that objection.

I don't think that an excessive number of likely apple-switcher customers will have lasting price objections.
post #69 of 240
.....
post #70 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

Saw it. Liked it. But it does have the ring of truth about it. I wonder how long it is before OS-X is just for power users?

Proof that Mac OS X has not been forgotten?
MAC OS X 10.7
There were sessions with wee bits of 10.7-related information, if you read between the lines (or search for 10.7 references in the iOS 4 SDK frameworks cough, AV Foundation, cough). 10.7 is clearly proceeding, and word on the street is that its picking up steam.
http://daringfireball.net/2010/06/wwdc_wrapup
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walney View Post

Sorry, but maybe I misunderstood what you said. I took it from your original post that you thought that the future of the mini was going to be constrained because there wouldn't be enough space to make way for faster/hotter processors and gfx. My comment was merely that if they had left the case at the same size then there wouldn't be the same physical constraints, since they have done such a remarkable job on shrinking the logic board further, giving Apple (not me) the flexibility of including meatier components at a later date without yet another case redesign.

I was pointing out that C2D can't be used forever. This goes for the 13" notebooks, too. Sure, they didn't have to make the case so small, but they did, and since Intel isn't licensing the QuickPath Interconnect and Intel HD IGPs are shite I think the only options for the future of these small Macs is to remove the optical drive, shrink some components (even though I don't think is feasible), and/or change from Intel to AMD for the CPU.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #71 of 240
.....
post #72 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walney View Post

Point taken, or maybe it can... perhaps the real future of the mini is that it does indeed turn into appleTV (isn't that still using a Celeron processor?)

At $700 I'd consider it foolish for Apple to not allow customers to make the Mac Mini into a very expensive AppleTV if they had the software for it.

It currently uses an Intel Pentium M-class chip. I think it's a special chip that wasn't ever part of their typical lineup.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #73 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by WelshDog View Post

So it seems. However, a really good BluRay player cost several hundreds of dollars. Adding a BluRay drive to the Mini would work, but the video output quality would surely be lacking. No room for the necessary processing video chips.

The 320m should be able to decode BR video just fine, even the 9400m can (assuming you're running Windows...).

As far as actual cost, it should be cheap for an OEM like Apple, to add BR. When I added a BR drive to my PC, it was about $70 for the drive and a copy of PowerDVD that could playback BR. I have it hooked up to my 1080p TV over HDMI.

Although knowing Apple, they'd probably tell people to just buy a BR player if they wanted to watch BR movies though.
post #74 of 240
While the Mini was originally intended as the low-cost, entry-level Mac, it hasn't played out that way. You need only to visit any college campus to see what the actual entry-level Mac is. Meanwhile, the Mini has found its place as a small Mac server for businesses, and as home entertainment units, and it's clear that that's how Apple is now positioning the Mini.

Is the Mini still compelling in those two markets? I think so.
post #75 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Oddly, there is still no mDP- or DP-to HDMI adapters or cables that support audio. Not even from Monoprice. It's not like they have to do anything crazy to make an HDMI cable with audio.

Even more odd is that Apple doesn't offer such an adapter. Note that the Mac Mini comes with an HDMI-to-DVI Adapter which is new, whilst they've offered a mDP-to-DVI adapter since first started using mDP.

That's strange, the mDP-HDMI adapter I purchased about 8 months says on the package that it supports audio, my MacBook won't do it so I can't test that out.
post #76 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamG View Post

Bingo. You know that they are no longer primarily a computer company.

further, Apple seems to be attempting to change the very nature of what people presume a computer to be.
an aye for an eye, the truth is a lie; a fish cannot whistle & neither can I.
Reply
an aye for an eye, the truth is a lie; a fish cannot whistle & neither can I.
Reply
post #77 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Proof that Mac OS X has not been forgotten?

I don't believe OS X has been forgotten. They'll be an 10.7 and then a 10.8. But I do think it is becoming a lot less important to Apple. During the Vista era Apple were quite aggressive going after Windows customers. They had the fantastic Get a Mac ad campaign and they brought out the Mac mini at an unheard of price for a Mac. As you noted they are selling more Macs in a quarter than they used to sell in a year just a few years ago. However, their strategy is changing and Apple are no longer going after MS in the same way. iOS is looking like it is the future of Apple, not OS X.

Going forward I wouldn't be surprised iOS 5 or iOS 6 removes the iTunes dependency, moving functionality to the cloud or allowing iOS devices to work directly with a Time Capsule for backup and media storage. OS X will be for power users (people who need to run Photoshop or Xcode or create massive spreadsheets). iOS will be for everyone else.
post #78 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by guinness View Post

The 320m should be able to decode BR video just fine, even the 9400m can (assuming you're running Windows...).

As far as actual cost, it should be cheap for an OEM like Apple, to add BR. When I added a BR drive to my PC, it was about $70 for the drive and a copy of PowerDVD that could playback BR. I have it hooked up to my 1080p TV over HDMI.

Although knowing Apple, they'd probably tell people to just buy a BR player if they wanted to watch BR movies though.

Accoridng to an AI article the Nvidia 320M does support Pure Video HD so Full-Profile Blu-ray and HD-DVD decoding is possible.

If you can find me a 9.5mm ultra-slim slot-loading Blu-ray drive that works within the power constraints of the Mac Mini and Mac notebooks for $70 I'll start up a business tomorrow and cut you in all profits.

As previously stated, you can't just plug in a Blu-ray drive and play a Blu-ray movie. You'd still have to install and play it through Windows; and not through a VM, it has to be native install via BootCamp.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #79 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orlando View Post

... OS X will be for power users (people who need to run Photoshop or Xcode or create massive spreadsheets). iOS will be for everyone else.

Every time someone makes this argument, which has some truth in it, for some purposes, there is always the implicit premise that OS X, OS X hardware, OS X software, the things people do on OS X will somehow just stand still while iOS and the mobile devices it runs on, and the software it runs will evolve into OS X replacements. The entire argument depends on that premise, and that premise is entirely, obviously and fatally flawed. OS X class systems will always outpace the capability of portable iOS class systems.

There are a lot of other things wrong with the argument that iOS powered (and similar) devices will replace OS X class systems, such as that OS X UI will be more productive than iOS UI in situations where you connect a keyboard and pointing device, and that the ergonomics of touch are ill suited to certain tasks, but given that a necessary and fundamental premise is false, I have trouble understanding why people are jumping on this bandwagon, other than to attribute it to touch screen hysteria.
post #80 of 240
Quote:
Originally Posted by ameldrum1 View Post

form above function.

imagine trying to actually insert an SD card (or connect a USB drive) when this unit is sitting snugly in your TV/entertainment unit with a bunch of cables connected to the back (making it difficult to move). or even reach the power switch for that matter...

dumb, dumb, dumb.

totally, totally, totally ...

or, as in my case, my Oct 2009 Mac Mini (which I like, esp at the $100 cheaper price I spent), where even though it has FIVE USB, I put a powered USB Hub in one of them so I can actually insert and remove my flash drives without having to crawl under the desk.

Apple has really gone too far down the artsy must-look-clean path to the point of making it hard to actually plug anything into it. Sigh.
The Universe is Intelligent and Friendly
Reply
The Universe is Intelligent and Friendly
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Current Mac Hardware
AppleInsider › Forums › Mac Hardware › Current Mac Hardware › First look: Apple' new unibody Mac mini