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International sales expected to account for 80% of iPhones sold in 2010

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
International expansion of the iPhone is the single most important driver of Apple stock in 2010, with overseas sales predicted to account for 80 percent of all of the company's handset sales by the end of 2010, one analyst believes.

Brian Marshall with Gleacher & Company (formerly Broadpoint AmTech) issued a note to investors Wednesday, in which he increased his 2010 iPad sales estimates to 12 million in calendar year 2010, and 20 million in 2011. And while those figures are astounding for a new product cateogry, the analyst said that the iPhone is still in the "driver's seat" for Apple.

That's because Apple's international carrier partners offer a postpaid subscriber base more than six times larger than AT&T, the exclusive wireless carrier of the iPhone in the U.S. Despite that, international sales in calendar year 2009 represented only 60 percent of total units sold.

Out of 65.1 million potential postpaid subscribers in the U.S., Apple has a market penetration of 4.1 percent. Overseas, with its 150 carrier partners, Apple could access 460.7 million subscribers, but it only had a penetration of 1.3 percent as of March.

Marshall sees the international numbers growing even more by the end of 2010, making overseas sales responsible for 80 percent of the iPhones sold this year. He has "conservatively" estimated that the company will sell 40 million iPhones in calendar year 2010, and another 50 million in 2011.

To put the numbers in perspective, last quarter Apple sold 8.75 million iPhones in a three-month span, the best-ever quarter for iPhone sales. To achieve 40 million in sales by the end of 2010, Apple would need to far exceed those numbers.

Sales will no doubt be bolstered by this week's launch of the iPhone 4 in the U.S., France, Germany, the U.K and Japan. Last week, Apple revealed that more than 600,000 handsets were preordered on the first day of availability.



While the iPhone remains the most important aspect of Apple's business, the iPad represents a significant growing market, Marshall said. On Tuesday, the company revealed that it sold 3 million iPads in the product's first 80 days of availability.

"Amazingly, in its first quarter of introduction, we believe the iPad family will exceed $2bil in revenue (roughly 14% of our estimate of $15.1bil for AAPL's total revenue in the June '10 quarter)," Marshall wrote. "Recall it took the iPhone four quarters to cumulatively reach $2bil+ in revenue."

Gleacher & Company has a price target of $355 for AAPL stock. The estimates call for $65.8 billion in revenue and $15.75 earnings per share in calendar year 2010, increasing to $74 billion revenue and $17.75 EPS in 2011.
post #2 of 43
High international sales is not a suprise since they are rolling this phone out much earlier for the international community.
post #3 of 43
I know that most Americans want the option of a Verizon phone and I feel lucky being in the UK with lots of carrier options, but if predictions like this come true and I see no reason why they won't it shows that Apples current strategy of one iPhone model for all countries makes a lot of sense.

No reason to make a CDMA phone when you can't even produce enough GSM ones.
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post #4 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

High international sales is not a suprise since they are rolling this phone out much earlier for the international community.

It doesn't help that AT&T got 13,000,000 verification inquiries and was only able to process 600,000 before they stopped taking orders.
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post #5 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Gleacher & Company has a price target of $355 for AAPL stock. The estimates call for $65.8 billion in revenue and $15.75 earnings per share in calendar year 2010, increasing to $74 billion revenue and $17.75 EPS in 2011.

The forecasted increases in revenue and EPS (about 12%) don't seem to support an increase in stock valuation of 30% at least not on the face of it. Normally I can see how they got from one figure to the other, but in this case there seems to be a disconnect.
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post #6 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

I know that most Americans want the option of a Verizon phone and I feel lucky being in the UK with lots of carrier options, but if predictions like this come true and I see no reason why they won't it shows that Apples current strategy of one iPhone model for all countries makes a lot of sense.

No reason to make a CDMA phone when you can't even produce enough GSM ones.

Exactly. Now that AI has published this, lets hope we see a lot less articles here hyping a phone for Verizon. It always was about international expansion and Apple have made it clear in earnings calls that it's a big interest. Prioritising a CDMA phone would have been a foolish move. The best way to ignore the giant in the room (Nokia) would be to not focus on the international markets. Apple may not say it much but they can't help but face how successful Nokia is and would love to be on their turf.
post #7 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It doesn't help that AT&T got 13,000,000 verification inquiries and was only able to process 600,000 before they stopped taking orders.

That is truly sad. Apple really should get its act together and open the iPhone up to multiple carriers in the U.S. as soon as they can. Talk about cannibalizing their own potential sales.
post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

The forecasted increases in revenue and EPS (about 12%) don't seem to support an increase in stock valuation of 30% at least not on the face of it. Normally I can see how they got from one figure to the other, but in this case there seems to be a disconnect.

They make the assessment that PER is 20 times earnings, which despite the earnings uplift is more subdued. With a lower PER expectation though if anything that should flatten the price against EPS.
post #9 of 43
Lets not forget the secret 5th UMTS band found in the new iPhone supporting Japan's largest carrier, NTT docomo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

No reason to make a CDMA phone when you can't even produce enough GSM ones.

QFT!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple/// View Post

That is truly sad. Apple really should get its act together and open the iPhone up to multiple carriers in the U.S. as soon as they can. Talk about cannibalizing their own potential sales.

As saarek succinctly states it's more complex than simply "opening" the iPhone to multiple carriers.
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post #10 of 43
Why don't you ask Nokia how ignoring the US market has gone. A second phone on Verizon would do nothing detrimental to the iPhone juggernaut overseas. The "giant in the room" here in the US is Android and Apple is extremely foolish if they ignore this growing threat.


Quote:
Originally Posted by benice View Post

Exactly. Now that AI has published this, lets hope we see a lot less articles here hyping a phone for Verizon. It always was about international expansion and Apple have made it clear in earnings calls that it's a big interest. Prioritising a CDMA phone would have been a foolish move. The best way to ignore the giant in the room (Nokia) would be to not focus on the international markets. Apple may not say it much but they can't help but face how successful Nokia is and would love to be on their turf.
post #11 of 43
Its called a second supplier - google (or bing) Pegatron.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saarek View Post

I know that most Americans want the option of a Verizon phone and I feel lucky being in the UK with lots of carrier options, but if predictions like this come true and I see no reason why they won't it shows that Apples current strategy of one iPhone model for all countries makes a lot of sense.

No reason to make a CDMA phone when you can't even produce enough GSM ones.
post #12 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

It doesn't help that AT&T got 13,000,000 verification inquiries and was only able to process 600,000 before they stopped taking orders.

I am assuming a verification query includes things like eligibility for upgrades and not just activation. I was actually one of those people trying to verify that I could upgrade since the media was indicating that I could but AT&T was not indicating same. After numerous tries I finally got thru and was indeed given my correct status (upgrade at $199 waiving $18 fee). I actually did not plan on ordering that day but did want to be able to plan for the near future (looks further now with the high demand). I don't know that there is anyway to tell how many would have actually bought phones but since many were having problems similar to mine I have to expect that at was maybe a tenth or less of that 13M.

I am sure it is difficult to estimate demand for a product like this and with security issues even more difficult to outsource order handling but I have got to believe that a company that can keep an international cellular phone network running (I know a lot of people are unhappy about performance) should be able to do better than AT&T has done. Possibly Apple will be able to take some of that load off AT&T when they are up an running with the new data center.
post #13 of 43
Sigh. I guess no Mac Pro this year. Apple blows with the wind, no commitments to any long-term customers anymore. No wonder enterprises shun Apple. Good for stock, bad for original customers who really care about the company. Time to buy an iPhone and a Dell...
post #14 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by benice View Post

They make the assessment that PER is 20 times earnings, which despite the earnings uplift is more subdued. With a lower PER expectation though if anything that should flatten the price against EPS.

They are projecting a substantial increase in P/E over that time period. The justification for this isn't clear, unless they are expecting multiples to increase throughout the market over the coming year.
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post #15 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

They are projecting a substantial increase in P/E over that time period. The justification for this isn't clear, unless they are expecting multiples to increase throughout the market over the coming year.

It's extremely difficult to justify any reliable reason for multiples to increase across the market. Plus at 20-25 times earnings for a fairly mature company the best way to think of it is that it is more than fully valued.
post #16 of 43
The issue is time and money spent to engineer a phone just for CDMA, which, correct me if I am wrong, goes away in the next 24 months.

Apple doesn't need to sell every cell phone in the US. It's great that there is a market for Android. That's not a bad thing for Apple. But they are plenty successful with the one carrier for now. Why isn't that enough? It would be one thing if the phone struggled, if sales were hard to come by. If they needed a bigger footprint in the marketplace. Ah, they don't.

And honestly, the more Android choices, the more diluted that market becomes. The more handsets, the less often a given piece of software from the Android store will work on your particular phone. It's not a dire threat to Apple. It's going to get far uglier for all the various hardware producers (now Dell too!?) to make money and differentiate their particular phone in a MEANINGFUL way. I see rapid price drops, and manufacturers using ever cheaper hardware designs just to survive. Android may be Androids biggest problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Why don't you ask Nokia how ignoring the US market has gone. A second phone on Verizon would do nothing detrimental to the iPhone juggernaut overseas. The "giant in the room" here in the US is Android and Apple is extremely foolish if they ignore this growing threat.
post #17 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Why don't you ask Nokia how ignoring the US market has gone. A second phone on Verizon would do nothing detrimental to the iPhone juggernaut overseas. The "giant in the room" here in the US is Android and Apple is extremely foolish if they ignore this growing threat.

Nokia have said they're concerned with the lack of US market share though they also know they don't need to dominate a single market to succeed.
post #18 of 43
Who is this AT&T I keep hearing about?
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post #19 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Fearing View Post

The issue is time and money spent to engineer a phone just for CDMA, which, correct me if I am wrong, goes away in the next 24 months. ...

I'd be surprised if it did. I remember being at a Palm development conference in 2002 where everyone was talking about 3G as though it was something developers should be designing their apps for right then. How long did it take for that to become a reality, in the US at least?

I think technology rollout predictions, like software schedules, always tend to be more sanguine than reality shows in retrospect.
post #20 of 43
Its a radio. Do you really think Apple can engineer an amazing new phone like the iPhone 4 and can't figure out how to switch out the radios? While Palm was dying last year they still figured out how to release the Pre on multiple carriers in the US.

And CDMA is not going away in the next 24 months. Verizon has said CDMA will be around for 8-10 years. If Apple ever plans on releasing a Phone on Verizon or Sprint, they will have to do a CDMA phone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Fearing View Post

The issue is time and money spent to engineer a phone just for CDMA, which, correct me if I am wrong, goes away in the next 24 months.

Apple doesn't need to sell every cell phone in the US. It's great that there is a market for Android. That's not a bad thing for Apple. But they are plenty successful with the one carrier for now. Why isn't that enough? It would be one thing if the phone struggled, if sales were hard to come by. If they needed a bigger footprint in the marketplace. Ah, they don't.

And honestly, the more Android choices, the more diluted that market becomes. The more handsets, the less often a given piece of software from the Android store will work on your particular phone. It's not a dire threat to Apple. It's going to get far uglier for all the various hardware producers (now Dell too!?) to make money and differentiate their particular phone in a MEANINGFUL way. I see rapid price drops, and manufacturers using ever cheaper hardware designs just to survive. Android may be Androids biggest problem.
post #21 of 43
.

Here's an interesting post about iPhone market penetration in Finland:

http://www.tuaw.com/2010/06/23/iphon...land-of-nokia/

.
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post #22 of 43
Google activating 160,000 Android devices per day. That's up from 100,000/day at Google I/O last month. That extrapolates out to almost 60 million/year.

http://www.9to5mac.com/node/18456
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Its a radio. Do you really think Apple can engineer an amazing new phone like the iPhone 4 and can't figure out how to switch out the radios? While Palm was dying last year they still figured out how to release the Pre on multiple carriers in the US.

And CDMA is not going away in the next 24 months. Verizon has said CDMA will be around for 8-10 years. If Apple ever plans on releasing a Phone on Verizon or Sprint, they will have to do a CDMA phone.

It's a lot more than just a radio. Adding support for T-Mobile USA is just a radio. That isn't to say that it's difficult for them to make but the reasoning is clearly based on everything but difficulty.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

.

Here's an interesting post about iPhone market penetration in Finland:

http://www.tuaw.com/2010/06/23/iphon...land-of-nokia/

.

Interesting data.


Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Google activating 160,000 Android devices per day. That's up from 100,000/day at Google I/O last month. That extrapolates out to almost 60 million/year.

http://www.9to5mac.com/node/18456

I think the next quarter or two is the last Apple will have with iOS-based phones beating out Android-based phones per quarter. Apple will still continue to be the most profitable handset maker, but Google doesn't care about that.. at least not until Apple make iAd available for web sites, too.
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post #24 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

I am assuming a verification query includes things like eligibility for upgrades and not just activation. I was actually one of those people trying to verify that I could upgrade since the media was indicating that I could but AT&T was not indicating same. After numerous tries I finally got thru and was indeed given my correct status (upgrade at $199 waiving $18 fee). I actually did not plan on ordering that day but did want to be able to plan for the near future (looks further now with the high demand). I don't know that there is anyway to tell how many would have actually bought phones but since many were having problems similar to mine I have to expect that at was maybe a tenth or less of that 13M.

The majority of those verifications were obviously repeats. I doubt if more than a tiny percentage were people who verified that they were eligible and then didn't follow through. The overwhelming majority were people who verified 10-20 times (or more) and were unable to complete the transaction due to AT&T server congestion.

It was completely unforgiveable. As I've demonstrated elsewhere, even the large number of orders should not have messed things up to that extent. Note that people in other countries didn't have problems - and one would assume that the relative order rates would be comparable (that is, orders as a percent of installed base).

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Google activating 160,000 Android devices per day. That's up from 100,000/day at Google I/O last month. That extrapolates out to almost 60 million/year.

http://www.9to5mac.com/node/18456

Sorry, but I'll wait for independent numbers. We've already seen how unreliable self-reported Android sales figures are.
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post #25 of 43
What a fool. There is no way 80% will be sold overseas.
post #26 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by benice View Post

It's extremely difficult to justify any reliable reason for multiples to increase across the market. Plus at 20-25 times earnings for a fairly mature company the best way to think of it is that it is more than fully valued.

Back of the envelope, they are forecasting about 14 times earnings for 2010 at the current share price, and 25 times earnings for 2011 at their forecasted share price. Fiscal years, I assume. Among the many tricky moving parts here is the share price at the end of the FY, about three months away. If it's over 300, then they could be near the mark for the next year.
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post #27 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwatson View Post

Sigh. I guess no Mac Pro this year. Apple blows with the wind, no commitments to any long-term customers anymore. No wonder enterprises shun Apple. Good for stock, bad for original customers who really care about the company. Time to buy an iPhone and a Dell...

Dell?!!! NOOOOO! don't resort to that!
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Why don't you ask Nokia how ignoring the US market has gone. A second phone on Verizon would do nothing detrimental to the iPhone juggernaut overseas. The "giant in the room" here in the US is Android and Apple is extremely foolish if they ignore this growing threat.

Yes this is the best point I have seen made. Android is growing and soon may be a full blown title wave. The obvious problem is the bottleneck that Apple has with its one exclusive carrier which happens to have a BAD reputation. No matter how you cut this everyone and their grandmother knows that at&t has a dropped call problem. Even if its only true for certain areas, the damage is done as far as public image.

Opening the iPhone to multiple carrier's is a complicated issue. But if it's not done soon I am afraid that the iPhone will soon be eclipsed by Android and soon Android will become the behemoth giant of smart phones a lot like what PC's became to the Mac in the 90's.

I hate to say this but if Adobe Flash for Android is successful it may seriously help propel Android in momentum. Or its possible that Flash will do nothing for Android. Either way Apple needs to take a serious look at this oncoming threat.
post #29 of 43
The main question is still, why bother if you already have enough sales?

To paraphrase, Android doesn't have to fail for Apple to win, and vice verse. I have no idea how much goes into 'switching out' the components (not a hardware engineer), but having worked in software, I am used to people who ALWAYS think there is no problem doing anything, making any change. That usually is not so.

I have also read a lot of different accounts on when CDMA is going away. I don't know for sure.
But the main issue is, if Apple doesn't need more sales of the iPhone, if the partnership with AT&T is profitable, then why bother?

Also, as I mentioned in my post, doing it just to somehow 'win' or 'face off' against Android is silly. Android is going to have to face the fact that it will start to eat itself soon.


Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Its a radio. Do you really think Apple can engineer an amazing new phone like the iPhone 4 and can't figure out how to switch out the radios? While Palm was dying last year they still figured out how to release the Pre on multiple carriers in the US.

And CDMA is not going away in the next 24 months. Verizon has said CDMA will be around for 8-10 years. If Apple ever plans on releasing a Phone on Verizon or Sprint, they will have to do a CDMA phone.
post #30 of 43
A web plug-in will be the kingmaker?

Really?

And all those folks enjoying their iOS devices will leave for a non-iOS device because it offers - Flash?

Android and the iPhone can survive just fine together. I don't get any of your thinking beyond a reactionary POV.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple/// View Post

Yes this is the best point I have seen made. Android is growing and soon may be a full blown title wave. The obvious problem is the bottleneck that Apple has with its one exclusive carrier which happens to have a BAD reputation. No matter how you cut this everyone and their grandmother knows that at&t has a dropped call problem. Even if its only true for certain areas, the damage is done as far as public image.

Opening the iPhone to multiple carrier's is a complicated issue. But if it's not done soon I am afraid that the iPhone will soon be eclipsed by Android and soon Android will become the behemoth giant of smart phones a lot like what PC's became to the Mac in the 90's.

I hate to say this but if Adobe Flash for Android is successful it may seriously help propel Android in momentum. Or its possible that Flash will do nothing for Android. Either way Apple needs to take a serious look at this oncoming threat.
post #31 of 43
I don't think Apple cares about that either. They have not sold more computers running OSX then PC's running Windows and they do well enough.

Android faces a ton of difficulty making the platform valuable and meaningful in peoples minds. They face a deluge of hardware, no doubt some will be very bad, giving consumers a taste of Android they will not like. They face multiple version of OS's and the layer that hardware manufactures are putting atop.

Apple and Android will each face difficulties. But AGAIN, one need not fail for the other to do well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

It's a lot more than just a radio. Adding support for T-Mobile USA is just a radio. That isn't to say that it's difficult for them to make but the reasoning is clearly based on everything but difficulty.


Interesting data.



I think the next quarter or two is the last Apple will have with iOS-based phones beating out Android-based phones per quarter. Apple will still continue to be the most profitable handset maker, but Google doesn't care about that.. at least not until Apple make iAd available for web sites, too.
post #32 of 43
Go back and look at this Steve Jobs interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK7TQVFSA1Y

Flip over to around 2 minutes in and listen to him talk about Xerox's wasted opportunities in the early 80s. Then go to around 3:40 and watch to the end. You can hear the bitterness and anger in his voice as he talks about how Sculley screwed Apple, ruined what he had worked for over 10 years, and let Microsoft walk away with the prize.

If Jobs can help it, I don't think he'll let that happen again. Apple does not have "enough sales" and is not well served by ignoring customers who refuse to switch to AT&T.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Fearing View Post

The main question is still, why bother if you already have enough sales?

To paraphrase, Android doesn't have to fail for Apple to win, and vice verse. I have no idea how much goes into 'switching out' the components (not a hardware engineer), but having worked in software, I am used to people who ALWAYS think there is no problem doing anything, making any change. That usually is not so.

I have also read a lot of different accounts on when CDMA is going away. I don't know for sure.
But the main issue is, if Apple doesn't need more sales of the iPhone, if the partnership with AT&T is profitable, then why bother?

Also, as I mentioned in my post, doing it just to somehow 'win' or 'face off' against Android is silly. Android is going to have to face the fact that it will start to eat itself soon.
post #33 of 43
Maybe. I'm not CEO of Apple, what do I know!!?

But I'm not sure this is the same thing. (Apple vs. PC's) I suspect the mobile space will develop differently.

And if Android wins the day, so be it. But again, I'm not sure it matters . There is plenty of room in the market for different solutions. I would guess, 4 years out, it will be Windows Mobile, RIM, Android in some form and Apple. No knock out blows between these players. Perhaps a slow death by one or two.


Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

Go back and look at this Steve Jobs interview:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nK7TQVFSA1Y

Flip over to around 2 minutes in and listen to him talk about Xerox's wasted opportunities in the early 80s. Then go to around 3:40 and watch to the end. You can hear the bitterness and anger in his voice as he talks about how Sculley screwed Apple, ruined what he had worked for over 10 years, and let Microsoft walk away with the prize.

If Jobs can help it, I don't think he'll let that happen again. Apple does not have "enough sales" and is not well served by ignoring customers who refuse to switch to AT&T.
post #34 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark Fearing View Post

A web plug-in will be the kingmaker?

Really?

And all those folks enjoying their iOS devices will leave for a non-iOS device because it offers - Flash?

Android and the iPhone can survive just fine together. I don't get any of your thinking beyond a reactionary POV.

Perhaps you are correct that it is a reactionary point of view but I still believe it is a valid point of view. I don't mean to sound like "Apple is doomed!" or anything like that however the memories of the 1990's PC war if you will was not a pleasant one. Of course Apple is a completely different company today 100 percent different a 180 degree turn from the Apple of the mid nineties.

However, I think what is valid is if Fash for smartphones takes off and become success and Apple chooses to not support it otr ban it form their product, then yes I do think it will be a serious problem for Apple. More then that I think Flash has the ability to help kick start Android even more then where Android is today.

And now Android is growing and I believe flash will help them with that. And I think Apple need to keep an eye on this, and the fact that Android phones may one day soon outsell them three to one.
post #35 of 43
If you can believe the numbers on this site:
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-...m-and-cdma.htm
then GSM is about 4 times the size of CDMA worldwide.

But I think that 270 million possible subscribers should be big enough to recover costs for the development of a CDMA phone. And as far as I know even with 4G they would need CDMA for those providers because CDMA would be their fall back strategy when 4G is not available.

And I think Apple shouldn't hand a walled CDMA garden (no iPhone) to Android. But thats just me.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apple/// View Post

That is truly sad. Apple really should get its act together and open the iPhone up to multiple carriers in the U.S. as soon as they can. Talk about cannibalizing their own potential sales.

What about that exclusivity contract with at&t? Apple can't just walk away from it if at&t wants to hold them to it. Remember, Verizon apparently told Apple to go fly a kite when Jobs pitched it to them. At&t took the chance and are now reaping the benefits. Verizon laughed at the iPhone. At&t is crying all the way to the bank. If I ran at&t I would hold Apple to its contract for as long as possible.
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

What about that exclusivity contract with at&t? Apple can't just walk away from it if at&t wants to hold them to it. Remember, Verizon apparently told Apple to go fly a kite when Jobs pitched it to them. At&t took the chance and are now reaping the benefits. Verizon laughed at the iPhone. At&t is crying all the way to the bank. If I ran at&t I would hold Apple to its contract for as long as possible.

You are right about that. It is just awfully frustrating to watch Apple hurt themselves with bad publicity for what are perceived as AT&T's poor infrastructure.

I suppose that is what is truly keeping iPhone from other carriers at this point. Nothing seems exactly clear on this issue though. I haven't seen anything that states when this exclusivity ends. And on that note didn't Apple extend the AT&T exclusive partnership not to long ago? Nothing on this matter is too clear and it would seem Apple and AT&T would like to keep it that way.
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Sorry, but I'll wait for independent numbers. We've already seen how unreliable self-reported Android sales figures are.


Android demolishing iPhone in sales
May 10
NPD says that in the first three months of 2010, Android captured 28% of the smartphone market, while Apple's iPhone grabbed only 21%.
http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2010/05/...hone-in-sales/




----


More Data Shows Android Gaining on iPhone
June 14
Quantcast released its North American mobile OS market share report for May 2010 today and the results are indicative of a trend we have seen from other sources: The iPhone is still the market leader, but Android is making big gains.

In every category, Androids market share has risen, whereas iOSs has decreased.

iOSs share of the market has decreased 8.1% whereas Android has increased 12.2% over the last year.

http://mashable.com/2010/06/14/iphon...d-marketshare/




Related:


Gartner Predicts Android Beats iPhone by 2012
http://www.pointabout.com/2009/10/13...phone-by-2012/


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How Android is moving to the dashboard

But many car manufacturers are more interested in Android integration than in BlackBerry or iPhone.

While it will be a few years before we see full in-car systems running Android, Autumn will see the first cars available with built-in integration for Android smartphones that let you launch and control apps from the car's interface.

iPhone vs Android

Although they started by planning iPhone integration, car makers have been turning their focus to Android instead.

Robert Acker, the CEO of Aha Mobile, told TechRadar that Aha has an iPhone app that reads out tweets, Facebook updates and traffic alerts or streams podcasts from a driver-friendly interface.

Manufacturers plan to offer it as an in-car option, but many car companies have been asking them for an Android app instead.

"They have to do iPhone," says Acker,"but Android is a lot more open. There aren't as many steps as for iPhone integration and they don't have to buy a proprietary chip [from Apple]. A lot of them have said 'let's start by doing an Android integration and we'll add in the iPhone piece later."

Android has another advantage; although the iPhone 4 software adds multi-tasking it still doesn't let you launch an app remotely. "With Android, Acker explains, "I can plug my phone in and push this button in the car and launch apps on the phone.

"You're using the vehicle controls and you never have to look at the phone again. You can't have that kind of control on the iPhone." The phone will give the car an Internet connection "so you can play a Pandora radio station or listen to a Twitter feed in your vehicle, suggests Acker.
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http://www.techradar.com/news/world-...shboard-684722

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iPhone 4G Recall Rumors Are Spreading And Android Needs To Be Taking Advantage.
http://technology.gather.com/viewArt...81474978332284


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What iPhone? Here Come FOUR MORE Android Phones From Samsung
June 28
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...ung-2010-6.DTL
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Who is this AT&T I keep hearing about?

The single biggest impediment Apple faces in selling its iPhone:

http://techcrunch.com/2010/06/28/iphone-4-sales/
post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalTroll View Post

Android demolishing iPhone in sales

Sales, eh? It's funny how you think free OS that can be demolishing a HW device in sales. How about you use the information in the chart instead of making shit up to support a felonious agenda?

Is Android going to outpace iOS in per unit installations on smartphones? Absolutely! No one thinks or expect otherwise. Its being sold on dozens, maybe hundreds, of smartphone models around the world so why would you think otherwise compared to OS installs from ONE company that sells ONE new phone a year in TWO colours and in TWO sizes?
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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