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Apple says any mobile phone has reception issues when held wrong - Page 7

post #241 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

That I would believe is a software problem or network congestion problem, not a problem with the antenna.

Don't I wish. All I know is that the bars drop on the call today, day before they didn't, with the 3Gs.

I have been an early adopter my whole life, but this time I think that I am going to revert to my old phone for a few months. iPhones are cool, but at some level, I need to make a phone call.
post #242 of 444
Engagdet are using my screenshot compilation.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/06/25/h...ding-it-wrong/
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #243 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalTroll View Post

You must be new here.

Hang out a while. You'll learn from the others here that Apple's designs are infallible. Any issue that appears to be a result of an Apple design is merely a user error.

Yep.

And the hockey puck mouse was just misunderstood.
And the Wallstreet PBs never had any hinge problems.
And there was no NVidia replacement needed.
And no one's ever seen a bulging battery.
And....

I think that room must be given for all to express an opinion. Sometimes they are right, sometimes it is apple.
post #244 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by kresh View Post

I do buy his explanation about internal antenna placement and attenuation when occluded. He alludes that every phone suffers what the iPhone 4 does which is false.



Except that halfway through his article he starts to change his tune, he even says that it was a design decision by Apple and could not be fixed, which is a nice way of saying it has a design flaw. Yes it is a design flaw because they chose a thinner enclose that forbade an internal (non touchable) antenna.

So after equating other phones that lose a few bars when their antennas are occluded to the iPhone which goes out of service if simply touched in the wrong spot he goes on to link to a youtube video. This video shows an iPhone losing service by placing the iPhone 4 on it's side and laying a key across the antenna gap. That is plain bs, where is a SINGLE video of ANY OTHER PHONE completely going from full strength to no signal by laying a key on it. All it takes is one, just one and then he can say that all phones are affected this way.

So yes I do buy his explanation of antenna attenuation by hand occlusion in all phones, but I flatly refuse to believe that all phone are affected the way the iPhone 4 is by holding it, touching it or laying a key on it.



Yeah that made me wonder about his motivations in the whole thing. First he tries to muddy the water by saying all phones do that, then he claims he is going to buy one.



I did pre-order my iPhone 4, received it Wednesday, returned it to the Apple Store in Greensboro, NC this morning just waiting now on AT&T to cancel my contract upgrade. If I didn't have hundreds invested in iOS software then I would switch to a different platform.

Well he didn't say that laying a key on it would affect all phones. He explained that ALL phones now have the antenna at the bottom. He explains why. He explains the reason the iPhone would loose signal by moving the antenna from the bottom to the sides. He explains if you cover the bands on the sides, you can block the signal.

He never said all phones do that. He said all phones have the antenna at the bottom. Please read it carefully and show me where he says all phones do that. You are reading things into his article that aren't there. He does blame Apple for the design, but also implicates AT&T and the FCC as well.
post #245 of 444
I can't believe some #$@@# lawyer hasn't filed a class action case yet.
post #246 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbonner View Post

Don't I wish. All I know is that the bars drop on the call today, day before they didn't, with the 3Gs.

You do realize a single incident of a dropped call under uncontrolled conditions constitutes anecdotal evidence and that this is the most unreliable of all evidence, yes?
post #247 of 444
My Iphone works great!, as long as I'm not holding it in my hand!!!
post #248 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

I was so confused about this issue till Mr. Jobs told me what to think.

hold different
classic funny
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post #249 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Engagdet are using my screenshot compilation.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/06/25/h...ding-it-wrong/

I expect more sites to start using it.

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

Reply

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

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post #250 of 444
If they carry on saying rubbish like that I'm not buying one.

~Callum
post #251 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

Engagdet are using my screenshot compilation.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/06/25/h...ding-it-wrong/

That was so wrong. I emailed Thomas and told him how sleazy it was for him to be getting so much praise in the comments for something he ripped off by not attributing it to you!
post #252 of 444
I just ran a test with my 3G phone and in or out of the case, I found that when I squeezed it very tight, it would frequently not download at all under 3G, although as the below shows, the tests were somewhat inconsistent. Bars were between 4-5 no matter what I did (although I have experienced dropped calls even when I had 5 bars.) All tests were done in the left hand. Overall speeds are so bad because I live in NYC, although I'm currently in one of the boroughs with not so dense population, so it's a bit surprising that it's this bad, but that's AT&T for ya'!

Out of case held normally: 134/30
Out of case squeezed tight 0/24
In case held normally 56/51
In case squeezed tight 0/31
In case held normally 84/55

Waited a few minutes:
In case held normally: 52/34
In case squeezed tight: 137/27
Out of case held normally: 81/41
Out of case squeezed tight: 398/18
post #253 of 444
A bit off subject but for those of you who care about user agent strings, there is no difference between iPhone 4 and iPhone 3Gs with the latest iOS.

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8A293 Safari/6531.22.7

So if you are trying to target the larger pixel screen you will have to do differently by getting the Javascript window.screen object.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #254 of 444
Apple's competitors must be reading these posts with glee. It will be interesting to hear what Steve Jobs has to say tomorrow. The fix may be simple if it's software related. However, it looks more like a hardware problem. If so, the cost will be high...in recalls and lost sales. But there is a silver lining. Maybe this fiasco will force SJ to decide on expanding to other carriers even sooner. Can anyone smell a Verizon iPhone in the air?
post #255 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I don't think you can until there is some formal report stating it as such. We can theorize that it's significant to all devices sold and hypothesize as to what the cause is and what the resolution will be, but to we cannot reasonably claim that it's a "design flaw" that affects everyone while standing on an anti-Apple soapbox without looking like crazy people on the street spouting Revelations and prophesying the end of the world.

While you're right that we can't be 100% sure until a formal report, we are also getting a good idea where this is going. Every tech site and iPhone-centric site except for Wired has reported a problem. There have been reports from Germany and England of people suffering the same issue. What's clear is that this is not just about a bad batch. A bad batch would probably only affect 1% of users and probably in a certain region. The problems too widespread. It is seeming much more likely that users who are not having problems are relatively close to a tower. If one finger alone can drop the signal it is indicative of a problem. That is not an issue with previous iPhones.

This does not help the fact that Apple is blaming the end user. I've been using Apple products since I was seven years old (now 33) when Apple computers didnt have mice and a floppy disk was really floppy. I've never seen this kind of statement come out of Apple or Jobs.
post #256 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

A bit off subject but for those of you who care about user agent strings, there is no difference between iPhone 4 and iPhone 3Gs with the latest iOS.

Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/532.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0.5 Mobile/8A293 Safari/6531.22.7

So if you are trying to target the larger pixel screen you will have to do differently by getting the Javascript window.screen object.

You should use probably use CSS media queries...
post #257 of 444
Ah yes, the TROLLS have come out for this one. Ignorant that any cell phone can have reception issues when held because the human body is CONDUCTIVE. My original iPhone fluctuated in signal strength, especially when the lower plastic portion was obstructed. My Moto Razr V3 did the same thing because the entire phone was metal.

Did you know you can take your keyless remote for your vehicle and press against your chin to improve signal strength? Try it.

I can confirm that the iPhone 4 has far better reception than the original iPhone. I work in a rural city outside Los Angeles. My original iPhone would get 1 bar on Edge, and many lost signals throughout the day. My iPhone 4 has 4-5 bars on 3G and never loses the signal.

The only time I can get the signal to drop is if I take my thumb and index finger and cover the two seams at the bottom edge of the phone. Of course no one would hold the phone that way. If you hold it normally around the middle, no signal loss. So when you hold the phone, don't block the seams. It is not that hard to figure out, but based on some comments, perhaps it is really hard for some of you.

Plus, I don't know of anyone that doesn't buy a case for their phone. I am considering the bumper because it will raise the phone off the desk to protect the rear glass and camera lens. Now I just need to find a belt clip case that can hold the phone with the bumper.
post #258 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Russell View Post

I expect more sites to start using it.

It's on the front page of reddit, digg, all those news sites now. I only posted the images to AI.
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post #259 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

I just got my hands on one a few minutes ago. Girl in the office pre ordered one. I tested the antenna issue and here is my experience.

If I hold it normally with the left palm touching the area of concern it dropped from 5 bars to 4 after about 10-15 seconds. I was holding it gently not pressing hard into my palm. However if I pressed my thumb quite firmly across the seam it would drop the bars down to 2. I found that with normal use where you touch the sensitive location somewhat off and on during a call you should be ok, but if you are applying a lot of pressure as to make full skin contact for a sustained length of time you may affect the reception.

I think this is the important issue. First of all, completely wrapping your hands around the phone in the "death grip" hold, is completely artificial. I suspect any phone would have a problem if you did that with its antenna. What matters is actually how you hold the phone when using it, which obviously can vary with a smartphone, depending on what you are doing. So, a slight drop from a casual "shorting" of the antennae is probably not a big deal. If you have to actually firmly place a finger or thumb across the seam to cause it to drop out completely, again, an artificial situation, that probably isn't a big deal since it's not likely to happen in real world usage. I certainly don't see that happening during a call when you have the phone to your ear. It could be problematic if you are holding it in your hand to work with it, if that can cause enough contact with the base of your thumb to "short" it out.

I'm not an antenna expert by any means, but I'd guess the seam is located where it is because they wanted a certain length and/or shape to the antennae. It does seem to me to be something of a design problem to have the seam exactly where it is, but that may have been dictated by any number of other constraints. How big a problem that is depends on how much it affects real world use, not how it behaves in "death grips" or when deliberately making it happen by "shorting" the antennae across the seam. So, that you can make it lose signal isn't as important as whether you do make it lose signal when you are using it, as opposed to trying to make it lose signal.

The, "happens to some phones not others," thing could also just as easily be, "happens to some people not others," or, "happens in some locations and not others." There certainly don't seem to be adequate reports to determine which it is. But, so far, what we seem to have is that it can be made to happen, by some people on some phones at some locations, which is entirely too many variables to know what the exact nature of the problem is.

So, if people are going to post reports that, "it happens with my phone," or, "it doesn't happen with mine," it would be more useful if you describe: under what circumstances (real or artificial), whether you can reproduce it with other phones (iPhone 4 that is, if possible), if you can reproduce it with various other people (I would guess that each body could have a different effect, depending on any number of factors) doing what you did, if you can reproduce it at different locations, and other more exact details.

Right now, while I'm inclined to think there could be a problem, at least with some phones, or for some people, there's just way too much noise and way too little detail to judge how significant the issue is, or if it's significant at all


EDIT: I would also add two other points:

1. I think the response from Apple of, "don't hold it like that," was seriously bad PR.

2. I really think they need to be less passive on this issue, or it's really going to spin completely out of control for them. This isn't like other recent issues where they could just quietly address them on a case by case basis. I understand that companies don't like to make statements about issues like these as they are unfolding, but silence in this case, in their highest profile launch in years, is not going to help them.
post #260 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by kresh View Post

That was so wrong. I emailed Thomas and told him how sleazy it was for him to be getting so much praise in the comments for something he ripped off by not attributing it to you!

I don't mind. I didn't do it for attention. I did it to point it out is all. But yeah, he could have said he found the image somewhere at least.
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post #261 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

This does not help the fact that Apple is blaming the end user. I've been using Apple products since I was seven years old (now 33) and I've never seen this kind of statement come out of Apple or Jobs.

Apparently you missed the report when people claimed the inline remote was defective for the 2nd Gen iPod. People were not properly inserting the headphone cord and blaming Apple for a defective product. Apple released a knowledge base article explaining how to properly insert a headphone cord. What a concept. People were not fully inserting the cable and blaming Apple for it. Once they learned how to fully insert the cable, the remote worked. In the case of the iPhone 4, learn how to hold the iPhone and don't block the seams at the bottom, or buy a case if you are incapable of doing so. I am guessing most of the people commenting don't even have the phone in the first place.
post #262 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by HammerofTruth View Post

Well he didn't say that laying a key on it would affect all phones. He explained that ALL phones now have the antenna at the bottom. He explains why. He explains the reason the iPhone would loose signal by moving the antenna from the bottom to the sides. He explains if you cover the bands on the sides, you can block the signal.

He never said all phones do that. He said all phones have the antenna at the bottom. Please read it carefully and show me where he says all phones do that. You are reading things into his article that aren't there. He does blame Apple for the design, but also implicates AT&T and the FCC as well.

Doom on you for making me read his tripe again

Quote:
"Just about every cell phone in current production has the antenna located at the bottom." .... "OK, back to the iPhone 4. The antenna structure for the cell phone is still down at the bottom (I won't address the WiFi nor GPS antennas in this blog entry)."

This is where he is linking all phones to having problems because of FCC regs dictating antenna position. The problem is that this is a red herring and has taken up over half of the article because these types of complaints are not what is being harped upon by so many.

Quote:
The iPhone 4 has two symmetrical slots in the stainless frame. If you short these slots, or cover them with your hand, the antenna performance will suffer (see this video I found on YouTube). There is no way around this, it's a design compromise that is forced by the requirements of the FCC, AT&T, Apple's marketing department and Apple's industrial designers, to name a few.

Finally we get to the truth. Apple exposed the antenna to the user by choice, and this choice was a flaw that has become readily apparent.

This junk about the FCC has no bearing. The requirement is for the radiation point to be as far from the head as possible. It has nothing to do with it being an internal or an external antenna located a millimeter away from another antenna that the user can short across. What in the world is he even mentioning the FCC for?

AT&T, is he serious. AT&T does not participate in the design process, they evaluate manufactured phones to ensure that they meet their requirements. AT&T had no input on the decision to go with an external antenna. He is just throwing buckets of dirt in the creek to muddy the water!
post #263 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbonner View Post

I disagree. Most phones have the antenna encased in plastic,

agree with the same...!!
post #264 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Ah yes, the TROLLS have come out for this one

Google news for "iPhone problems": 3,560 hits

Google for "iPhone problems": 200,000,000 hits

Yep. All trolls, every last one of 'em.

Why can't they all play ball and just parrot whatever Steve says?
post #265 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by jodyfanning View Post

You should use probably use CSS media queries...

Hadn't considered that. What is the advantage over using JS.

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post #266 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

While you're right that we can't be 100% sure until a formal report, we are also getting a good idea where this is going. Every tech site and iPhone-centric site except for Wired has reported a problem. There have been reports from Germany and England of people suffering the same issue. What's clear is that this is not just about a bad batch. A bad batch would probably only affect 1% of users and probably in a certain region.

And all those sites have users saying they don't have a problem. Why are they ignored if not drive home the FUD that it's "design flaw" affecting ALL units.

There was one estimate of 1.5M units sold yesterday, including mailed-preorders. To be <1% that would be under 15,000 units affected with this "shorting out" when you touch both antenna. Are there anywhere near that many complaints or is this the typical perpetual internet reverberation machine from a very few devices having an issue.

Note that even if Apple dropped the number of bad units per 1000 by half there would still be more bad units if they sell more than double than the previous year. Will the internet account for scale?
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post #267 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Apparently you missed the report when people claimed the inline remote was defective for the 2nd Gen iPod. People were not properly inserting the headphone cord and blaming Apple for a defective product. Apple released a knowledge base article explaining how to properly insert a headphone cord. What a concept. People were not fully inserting the cable and blaming Apple for it. Once they learned how to fully insert the cable, the remote worked. In the case of the iPhone 4, learn how to hold the iPhone and don't block the seams at the bottom, or buy a case if you are incapable of doing so. I am guessing most of the people commenting don't even have the phone in the first place.

There is a major difference between not inserting headphones in deep enough and telling someone you're not holding a phone properly. I'm a lefty so I'd like to know exactly which way I should hold an iPhone. I'm in contact with it just like they show it in Apple's own videos and whenever I type.
post #268 of 444
I heard Steve Jobs is an anal SOB and that Apple is a horrible place to work. Too bad Apple is one of a very few companies that can really make good stuff with great customer support. But they do BS.
I remember when the mac cube was criticized when people started noticing striations popping on the plastic case. Some big Apple honcho said they weren't striations but veins like you see on flower pedals.
OMFG!!!!!
post #269 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

It's on the front page of reddit, digg, all those news sites now. I only posted the images to AI.

It would be nice to see it appear on sites like NYT and such...

No matter what type of media...movies, music, books, photos and web pages

look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

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post #270 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

And all those sites have users saying they don't have a problem. Why are they ignored if not drive home the FUD that it's "design flaw" affecting ALL units.

There was one estimate of 1.5M units sold yesterday, including mailed-preorders. To be <1% that would be under 15,000 units affected with this "shorting out" when you touch both antenna. Are there anywhere near that many complaints or is this the typical perpetual internet reverberation machine from a very few devices having an issue.

Note that even if Apple dropped the number of bad units per 1000 by half there would still be more bad units if they sell more than double than the previous year. Will the internet account for scale?

The problem with this theory is that Apple has responded themselves by saying there is no problem. There aren't any bad batches of iPhones out there and it's the customers' fault. If Apple is saying nothing is wrong then the only other conclusion is that it's the design of the iPhone itself.
post #271 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by bulk001 View Post

I was so confused about this issue till Mr. Jobs told me what to think.

na na na na
hey hey
good bye

apple really doomed now


the meds taken or not taken on this site boogles the mind

and ireland is now a troll
sorry dude you sound like spam sand / mac tripper

yet even spamboy is cool now

you went from cool dude to jerk-0 rama is like one day

truth is the iphone was never a good phone anyway ATT
and when verizon comes on board or t mobile i will wait on iphone anyhing
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post #272 of 444
Here is an article explaining the antenna requirements of ALL cell phones including the iPhone 4. The FCC has specific requirements on cell phone antennas, and explains the history of antennas and potential problems. So instead of reading all the BS speculuation about how Apple made a bad phone, understand the FCC's requirements on cell phones first.

http://www.antennasys.com/antennasys...-antennas.html
post #273 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalTroll View Post

Google news for "iPhone problems": 3,560 hits

Google for "iPhone problems": 200,000,000 hits

Yep. All trolls, every last one of 'em.

Why can't they all play ball and just parrot whatever Steve says?

Yes most here are trolls because they don't even own the phone and just spouting off the BS that they read on crappy sites like Gizmodo.

I actually have the iPhone 4 and it has better reception than previous models. The seams are at the bottom of the phone. Simple, don't block the seams. Same was true for the original iPhone, don't block the plastic cover on the lower rear because the antenna was behind it. And just like any other cell phone, don't block the antenna. Holding the phone without covering the seams with your fingers doesn't degrade the signal.
post #274 of 444
It is grossly unfair of Apple, at this stage of the game, to indicate that users of the iPhone 4 are holding the device incorrectly when it was not established prior to the rollout what is the correct way to hold the device. I have been using the 3GS for the past year in a left-handed grip in a way that is most comfortable for me without any problems of reception. To have to adopt a different grip for the iPhone 4 because the antenna is relocated on the device does not reflect the high quality of user experience that is the hallmark of Apple.

I did think it was a bit odd that those gaudy bumpers were mentioned in the keynote address at the WWDC event, which leads me to believe that the problem might have been known at that time. The bumpers are no cure for what appears to be a design flaw even though I must admit that the device is a beauty to behold. Perhaps if the break in the metal strip occurred at the bottom of the device (instead of the corners) where it would have less likely to be touched in a normal grip of the device, this would have alleviated the problem.
post #275 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

FACT: This is just highly questionable design... Function Should Never Follow Form

Remember:

- Good design makes a product useful (Apple iPhone 4 reception issue = Fail)

- Good design is durable (Apple iPhone fragility issue = Fail)

give me a break! When did durable mean that you can drop it and it still work?! Stupid comment. So, if my LCD falls off my wall due to crap wall mount....is it supposed to survive the fall too? Are you going to hold that "durability comment" across the board?
post #276 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Ah yes, the TROLLS have come out for this one. Ignorant that any cell phone can have reception issues when held because the human body is CONDUCTIVE. My original iPhone fluctuated in signal strength, especially when the lower plastic portion was obstructed. My Moto Razr V3 did the same thing because the entire phone was metal.

Did you know you can take your keyless remote for your vehicle and press against your chin to improve signal strength? Try it.

I can confirm that the iPhone 4 has far better reception than the original iPhone. I work in a rural city outside Los Angeles. My original iPhone would get 1 bar on Edge, and many lost signals throughout the day. My iPhone 4 has 4-5 bars on 3G and never loses the signal.

The only time I can get the signal to drop is if I take my thumb and index finger and cover the two seams at the bottom edge of the phone. Of course no one would hold the phone that way. If you hold it normally around the middle, no signal loss. So when you hold the phone, don't block the seams. It is not that hard to figure out, but based on some comments, perhaps it is really hard for some of you.

Plus, I don't know of anyone that doesn't buy a case for their phone. I am considering the bumper because it will raise the phone off the desk to protect the rear glass and camera lens. Now I just need to find a belt clip case that can hold the phone with the bumper.

I guess you missed the earlier post by Ireland today. You should look at those pics, as I guess none of the people know how to hold a phone. I think most people cradle the phone in the palm of their hand. Part of Steve Jobs sales pitch was how slim the phone is. So now we should buy bumpers or a case to add to the thickness or we are told that we are holding the phone wrong which is BS. When you bought your phone did the phone rep tell you how to hold it. I bet they didn't, as it should not make any difference how you hold a cell phone. My cell phone works fine no matter how I hold it. Your post sounds like you might be Steve J, are you?
post #277 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

The problem with this theory is that Apple has responded themselves by saying there is no problem. There aren't any bad batches of iPhones out there and it's the customers' fault. If Apple is saying nothing is wrong then the only other conclusion is that it's the design of the iPhone itself.

Where else are they supposed to put the antenna? It has to go somewhere. FCC requires specific placement of the antenna, which they don't care how the phone is held for those requirements. If Apple and other cell phone makers don't follow FCC rules, the phone never gets released. FCC requires the antenna to be at the bottom of cell phones, just like the original iPhone and iPhone 3G. If you blocked the plastic cover on the original iPhone, your signal degraded, and guess where that was when you held it, right in the palm of your hand.
post #278 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillstones View Post

Apparently you missed the report when people claimed the inline remote was defective for the 2nd Gen iPod. People were not properly inserting the headphone cord and blaming Apple for a defective product. Apple released a knowledge base article explaining how to properly insert a headphone cord. What a concept. People were not fully inserting the cable and blaming Apple for it. Once they learned how to fully insert the cable, the remote worked. In the case of the iPhone 4, learn how to hold the iPhone and don't block the seams at the bottom, or buy a case if you are incapable of doing so. I am guessing most of the people commenting don't even have the phone in the first place.


When was the 1st Gen ipod released? Oct '01. When was the 2nd Gen released? July '02.
The general public had less than 10 months to get familiarized with this new type of gadget.

How long have hand held cell phones been on the market? Over 2 decades.
Don't you think people have learned how to hold a phone by now?

Ask yourself, why are calls being dropped, when being held normally, is only happenening to the iphone?
It has a design flaw.

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look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

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look better and sound better on the Kindle Fire HD and HDX than any iPad

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post #279 of 444
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalTroll View Post

Google news for "iPhone problems": 3,560 hits

Google for "iPhone problems": 200,000,000 hits

Yep. All trolls, every last one of 'em.

Why can't they all play ball and just parrot whatever Steve says?

keep in mind that your search parameters returns all web sites that include "iPhone" by itself and "problem" by itself - try "iPhone Problem" and the hit count drops to 120,000.

and keep in mind that of those many may be utterly unrelated to current versions of hardware and or software and or reception issues.

google hits is generally not a good indicator of the scale of anything - I just did a search for -- my left thumb - and got 3.6 million hits.

tries - car explodes - and got 1.5 million hits.

so if you use google hit count - people should be very afraid of any vehicle and their left thumbs as well as concerned about iPhone issues.
post #280 of 444
I haven't heard of any other cell phone companies having this antenna problem and have never heard any of them say the customers were holding the phone wrong!!!!!!!! Maybe Steve SHOULD find out where the antenna should be placed. (Possible with another carrier!!)
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