or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Death Grip hysteria may end Monday with iOS 4.01
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Death Grip hysteria may end Monday with iOS 4.01 - Page 9

post #321 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I'm pretty sure that once all iPhone users upgrade to the latest version of iOS, which is version 4.0, that they will all have the same features, which includes the gyroscope capability. It would be an example of fragmentation as solipsism would say, but that could never be true in this situation.

Upgrading old phones virtually guarantees seamless feature parity across all iPhone versions.

Unless I am very wrong, the gyroscope is new hardware built into iP 4, ditto the sound canceling microphone. There are certainly iOS 4 software features that work with this hardware, but the iPhone G3 can never have these functions without the hardware.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #322 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

I know, that was my point, which you did not understand. Non-idiot designers tend to put antennae in locations where they will be touched the least, aka the bottom of the phone (or the top, but the FCC doesn't allow that).

Apple is the only idiotic company that puts the ANTENNAE of a PHONE into the grip.

Actually, if you look at the phone, it's in the same location on the iPhone 4. About a quater of an inch on the bottom is segregated from the rest.

Apple themselves said it was affected by the bottom left corner, just as the HTC manual states. The 3G's and 3GS also experiences the same issue under iOS4. Was it a design flaw that simply wasn't noticed for a few years on those models?
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #323 of 604
Quote:
Ah... well, the actual rational explanation is that you're in an area of poor reception. If you can duplicate this underneath a tower where the reception is known to be 100%, then you may have a point. Otherwise, the evidence, the video, the conclusions... all scientifically meaningless.

As an addendum to the original post, you don't need to be under a tower to know you have full strength on the phone. That's what 5 bars means on an iPhone 4, unless you are claiming that Apple falsely represents signal strength in its software.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #324 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Unless I am very wrong, the gyroscope is new hardware built into iP 4, ditto the sound canceling microphone. There are certainly iOS 4 software features that work with this hardware, but the iPhone G3 can never have these functions without the hardware.

No, you are very right about that actually. It was more a point to show solipsism that fragmentation is alive and well in the iOS realm because of hardware feature differences and the inability for phones like the iPhone EDGE to upgrade its software features in line with the iPhone 4.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #325 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJRumpy View Post

Actually, if you look at the phone, it's in the same location on the iPhone 4. About a quater of an inch on the bottom is segregated from the rest.

Apple themselves said it was affected by the bottom left corner, just as the HTC manual states. The 3G's and 3GS also experiences the same issue under iOS4. Was it a design flaw that simply wasn't noticed for a few years on those models?

The iPhone 4 antenna is the metal strip around the phone, not at the base of the phone as in other designs.

In other words, the iPhone 4 antenna is completely exposed to the hands where in other phone designs the antenna is located under plastic and is in the interior of the phone away from direct physical contact with the hand.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #326 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The iPhone 4 antenna is the metal strip around the phone, not at the base of the phone as in other designs.

In other words, the iPhone 4 antenna is completely exposed to the hands where in other phone designs the antenna is located under plastic and is in the interior of the phone away from direct physical contact with the hand.

And? Why do they experience the same issue on 3G and 3GS after upgrading to iOS4 but not before? I should also point out that in the HTC manual, the point they indicate is not at the bottom. It's on the lower left side.
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #327 of 604
So, Spencer Webb says, "And efficient transmission and reception while being held by a human hand are simply not design requirements!"

Am I the only one who finds this out-of-line for a phone designer?

I think back to the article "The iPhone is the worst phone in the world"
http://is.gd/d5zjn
post #328 of 604
After reading dozens of comments over the past two days I have observed:

1. There are iP4 users with reception problems.

2. Not all iP4 users are experiencing the anomaly.

3. There seem to be as many opinions (guesses) about the cause as there are posters.

My conclusion is that no one knows the cause...i.e. antenna design flaw and/or manufacturing issue.

So hopefully, the technical experts at Apple will find the answer soon so all the Apple and iPhone whiners can get on with their lives. I'm sure Steve Jobs is sorry he even commented on this issue before the Apple technical folks had a more definitive answer.
post #329 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The iPhone 4 antenna is the metal strip around the phone, not at the base of the phone as in other designs.

In other words, the iPhone 4 antenna is completely exposed to the hands where in other phone designs the antenna is located under plastic and is in the interior of the phone away from direct physical contact with the hand.

If you were to point this out to one of Apple's engineers, what do you think he or she would say? ..."Oh, I wasn't aware that would be a problem"? If there is indeed a real problem, I think it's going to be a little more involved than a metal band.
post #330 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJRumpy View Post

And? Why do they experience the same issue on 3G and 3GS after upgrading to iOS4 but not before? I should also point out that in the HTC manual, the point they indicate is not at the bottom. It's on the lower left side.

If Apple changed something in the iOS 4.0 which affected the antenna, it is still a design flaw by definition.

Apple might have to go back to an original, safer antenna software design, but who knows how much of a performance hit the iPhone will take in terms of CPU use, call quality, or battery life.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #331 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

If Apple changed something in the iOS 4.0 which affected the antenna, it is still a design flaw by definition.

Apple might have to go back to an original, safer antenna software design, but who knows how much of a performance hit the iPhone will take in terms of CPU use, call quality, or battery life.

Now that I agree with. If they find that they cannot resolve the issue via a software update, they will be in a world of hurt.
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #332 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasein View Post

True, but no one knows at this point that anyone knew anything before full scale production was authorized. We're arguing in the dark. Look, if it does turn out to be a design flaw, don't you think Apple is going to do something about it? But it's premature to determine that anything (or at least any ONE thing) is responsible for what some people (others, not) are experiencing. You really stand by your statement that there was a "complete lack of testing"? That's hard to buy.

No, I don't think Apple is going to do anything about it. They have a long history of not doing anything about defective devices. Than invites class action lawsuits and hard feelings.

Once Apple has your money their interest level is something approaching zero. I do wish I could say otherwise, but history does not support a contrary expectation. It would be refreshing if Apple were to embrace the customers and start earning a reputation of doing right by them, but that would be out of character.

Did you own a Smurf (Blue and White)? It had defective Firewire and ATA controllers among other things that were not correct (they shipped out-of-spec RAM on some, but not all, of them and several batches of CPUs had major problems). Apple's actions? None. They left it up to the owners to identify the problems and figure out solutions. Yea, this is ancient history, but that is the point. Apple has a long history of (mis)behaving this way.

Sorry. If I am proven wrong, please remind me. Nothing would please me more.
post #333 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

Loss of reception while dialing out?
Avoid using the phone for phone calls.

Dropped calls in San Francisco?
Avoid going to San Francisco.

Playhouse Disney (or other flash site) doesn't work in the browser?
Avoid going to that site.

Screen gets smudged?
Avoid touching the screen.

Hate getting ripped off for expensive junk?
Stop buying Apple products.





Seriously, if the software fix doesn't do it, there will be multitudes of ripped off users who will be pissed off.

Enough is enough dude. Welcome to my ignore list, and good riddance to you.
post #334 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasein View Post

If you were to point this out to one of Apple's engineers, what do you think he or she would say? ..."Oh, I wasn't aware that would be a problem"?

I think Steve Jobs' obsession over thinness is the compromising restriction which forced the engineers to make critical design errors.

Every electrical engineer (and now every iPhone user) knows about signal attenuation due to the hand touching the antenna. But it was Apple's ultimate design decision to sacrifice a better antenna placement in favor of a more aesthetically-pretty location.

Now Apple is suffering criticism for that.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #335 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

No, I don't think Apple is going to do anything about it. They have a long history of not doing anything about defective devices. Than invites class action lawsuits and hard feelings.

Once Apple has your money their interest level is something approaching zero. I do wish I could say otherwise, but history does not support a contrary expectation. It would be refreshing if Apple were to embrace the customers and start earning a reputation of doing right by them, but that would be out of character.

History would tend to disagree with you.

From 2009: http://www.appleinsider.com/articles...tion_rate.html

From 2008: http://technologizer.com/2008/09/30/...-satisfaction/

From 2007: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/orchant/ip...are-unreal/523
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #336 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

If Apple changed something in the iOS 4.0 which affected the antenna, it is still a design flaw by definition.

Apple might have to go back to an original, safer antenna software design, but who knows how much of a performance hit the iPhone will take in terms of CPU use, call quality, or battery life.

Now you're just muddling the meaning of words, and mixing issues and concepts, so that what you're saying is so meaningless that however this turns out you can claim you were right.
post #337 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

No, I don't think Apple is going to do anything about it. They have a long history of not doing anything about defective devices. If I am proven wrong, please remind me. Nothing would please me more.

Apple has one of the highest (highest in many cases) satisfaction ratings in independent consumer report surveys with computers, mp3 style devices (ipod) and the iPhone. Their market cap overtook Microsoft a few weeks ago. Consumers and investors have confidence in what they're doing. They must be doing SOMETHING right.
post #338 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

You don't understand the scientific method.

The hypothesis was that holding a phone attenuates the signal.

The experiment was done to evaluate this, by finding the exact location when the phone loses signal. That experiment shows definitively that the point is the insulated portion between the two antennae.

It is scientifically established.

This appears to be more than simple attenuation issue. Attenuation, if it occurs is the result of some object or body part being placed between the antenna and the tower. That probably occurs to a greater or lesser extent with all cell phones. What is also involved here is the simultaneous, direct physical contact with the cell phone antenna and the wi-fi/Bluetooth antenna which may result in several different things happening. Probably none of them are beneficial.

For example, hold the iPhone between your thumb and index finger on the upper portion of the phone and then cup your other hand around the lower portion of the phone, but do not permit the hand cupping the lower portion to touch the phone. Then hold the phone so that the upper and lower portions are "bridged" and so on.
post #339 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Now you're just muddling the meaning of words, and mixing issues and concepts, so that what you're saying is so meaningless that however this turns out you can claim you were right.

Hardware design and software design are two different things.

Both can be flawed.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #340 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

Hardware design and software design are two different things.

Both can be flawed.

For example, perhaps Apple decided that it wanted to sacrifice significant phone call quality and reliability for marginally-better battery life. That is a design decision, and it's an arguably flawed one at that.

Nobody knows exactly what causes the signal problem, but the best guess is that it's a design flaw, hardware or software. Some are betting hardware with no fix, some are betting software with a fix, some are betting hardware with a software fix.

We'll find out Apple's response soon.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #341 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasein View Post

Apple has one of the highest (highest in many cases) satisfaction ratings in independent consumer report surveys with computers, mp3 style devices (ipod) and the iPhone. Their market cap overtook Microsoft a few weeks ago. Consumers and investors have confidence in what they're doing. They must be doing SOMETHING right.

What you have said has absolutely nothing to do with what I said.

Oh, by the way, the frequently misquoted and misunderstood "market cap" or market capitalization is not correct (I am not picking on you) should be "market valuation". In other words, it represents (as a snapshot in time) the total market value of the outstanding shares of stock. As that figure goes up and down it has no direct impact on the company because this is not money going to the company (which sold the shares of stock quite some time ago). In any event the fact that Apple's market valuation may be greater than that of M$ has no bearing on the past history of Apple in dealing with problems and, base upon the past history, the likelihood of Apple doing anything about present problems.

Whether Apple are "doing something right" (which they are) has nothing to do with what Apple are likely to do to resolve present problems either.

Cheers
post #342 of 604
Although I count myself among those who see most of this as hysteria, there is this:

Some have said that "it" cannot be a design flaw unless 100% of users experience it. I don't think that is true. A design flaw can be one that allows intermittent or sporadic problems, not only constant ones.

That having been said, I remain unconvinced that a design flaw is the sole cause for all this hubbub.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #343 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

You don't understand the scientific method.

The hypothesis was that holding a phone attenuates the signal.

The experiment was done to evaluate this, by finding the exact location when the phone loses signal. That experiment shows definitively that the point is the insulated portion between the two antennae.

It is scientifically established.


That's not science. You don't understand what a hypothesis is. That's not an experiment that means anything. There is no control.

What we have, and only what we have, are observations. Fractured, isolated, incomplete observations.

No hypothesis. No experiment. No proof. and no bloody science.
post #344 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by chillin View Post

That's not science. You don't understand what a hypothesis is. That's not an experiment that means anything. There is no control.

What we have, and only what we have, are observations. Fractured, isolated, incomplete observations.

No hypothesis. No experiment. No proof. and no bloody science.

No, science today is "I saw it on the internet so it must be true." You're so last century.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #345 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

As an addendum to the original post, you don't need to be under a tower to know you have full strength on the phone. That's what 5 bars means on an iPhone 4, unless you are claiming that Apple falsely represents signal strength in its software.

Yeah, ok.... adding another fallacy... strawman this time.

Here's the trouble. How do you have any idea what you are seeing is accurate? If you want, I can make it so your iPhone 4 reads 5 bars and never reads anything but 5 bars regardless of reception.
I'm not saying Apple is lying to you, or your iPhone is lying to you.

I'm saying you don't know. If you don't verify, test, calibrate... you just don't know.

But under a tower, you do know. Eliminate the variables you can.
post #346 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBR View Post

What you have said has absolutely nothing to do with what I said.

Oh, by the way, the frequently misquoted and misunderstood "market cap" or market capitalization is not correct should be "market valuation". In other words, it represents (as a snapshot in time) the total market value of the outstanding shares of stock. As that figure goes up and down it has no direct impact on the company because this is not money going to the company (which sold the shares of stock quite some time ago). In any event the fact that Apple's market valuation may be greater than that of M$ has no bearing on the past history of Apple in dealing with problems and, base upon the past history, the likelihood of Apple doing anything about present problems.

Whether Apple are "doing something right" (which they are) has nothing to do with what Apple are likely to do to resolve present problems either.

Cheers

Market Cap is valuation. And it certainly does have a direct impact on a company (ask Chrysler and GM). Rising stock valuation means a company is positioned a lot better for corporate bond purposes as one example.. try offering corporate bonds when your stock is dead in the water or tanking relative to a competitor's. Finally, your company stock doesn't go up if your past history stinks. Investors keep a keen eye on profitability and probability of stock going up, which only happens when consumers are flocking to your product. What business do you run?
post #347 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasein View Post

Market Cap is valuation. And it certainly does have a direct impact on a company (ask Chrysler and GM). Rising stock valuation means a company is positioned a lot better for corporate bond purposes as one example. Finally, your company stock doesn't go up if your past history stinks. Investors keep a keen eye on profitability and probability of stock going up, which only happens when consumers are flocking to your product. What business do you run?

No. You are 100% completely wrong.

If a company's stock is worthless, that is merely a symptom of other problems that increase the risk factors associated with a bond offering. There is no direct relationship.
post #348 of 604
So is this a signal reception issue or a signal reception INDICATOR issue.

It was always my understanding that as 3G relies on simultaneous communication with multiple towers that the indicator (bars) presents an average.

You can be showing 1 or 2 "bars" but have full reception from one tower and low reception from others.

The people spread across the web who seem to be complaining the most about this "issue" are people who DON'T HAVE iPhone 4's.

So when your hand is touching this area and the signal INDICATOR drops, what happens when you make a call?

Does it work or do you get "call failed" errors?
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
Reply
post #349 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

So is this a signal reception issue or a signal reception INDICATOR issue.

That's a good point, though I doubt it's an indicator issue. THe question is why do we even have bars? What good do they do us? Either we can make a call or we can't, and we act like the bars actually give us meaningful information. Kind of silly. It should be a binary indicator, either it's there or it isn't.
post #350 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

So is this a signal reception issue or a signal reception INDICATOR issue.

It was always my understanding that as 3G relies on simultaneous communication with multiple towers that the indicator (bars) presents an average.

You can be showing 1 or 2 "bars" but have full reception from one tower and low reception from others.

The people spread across the web who seem to be complaining the most about this "issue" are people who DON'T HAVE iPhone 4's.

So when your hand is touching this area and the signal INDICATOR drops, what happens when you make a call?

Does it work or do you get "call failed" errors?

It isn't just a signal indicator error, at least not for me. Data and voice fail completely often to "no service", whether I had 1,2,3,4 or 5 bars, and it means NO service.
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
Reply
We are nurturing a nightmare that will haunt our children, and kill theirs.
Reply
post #351 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by chillin View Post

That's a good point, though I doubt it's an indicator issue. THe question is why do we even have bars? What good do they do us? Either we can make a call or we can't, and we act like the bars actually give us meaningful information. Kind of silly. It should be a binary indicator, either it's there or it isn't.

If I recall, there's actually a code you can put in that will modify your sim to show signal strength in db, rather than bars.

*3001#12345#*
Quote:
- Open the iPhone's dialer keypad
- Enter *3001#12345#*
- Press the Call button

You can't 'undo' this after doing it though. It will move with your sim. Be warned. You can click on the decibel rating and it will toggle between the two but I never figured how to disable the decibel rating altogether.

http://www.cellsignalreception.com/c...-strength.html

-50 dB woud be a perfect signal (very strong)
-100 db would be a very weak signal (probably 1, maybe two bars)
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #352 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJRumpy View Post

If I recall, there's actually a code you can put in that will modify your sim to show signal strength in db, rather than bars. I can't remember what it is though.


plutil -s SBShowRSSI -v YES com.apple.springboard.plist

For a long time I had mine set that way, but finally realized that the precise information was even less useful than the abstracted representation.
post #353 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by chillin View Post

plutil -s SBShowRSSI -v YES com.apple.springboard.plist

For a long time I had mine set that way, but finally realized that the precise information was even less useful than the abstracted representation.

Easier to just type the code in on the phone

I do know that the 'test mode' followed me from my old 2G to my 3G when they moved my sim from one to the other. Some claim they were able to turn it off by doing a restore, but since the old sim in the new phone still showed the decibel rating, I don't believe a restore would reset it either. In any case, it's harmless and a quick tap on the decible rating will return it to a regular 0-5 bar display.

I did have an Apple genius once ask me if it was jail broken as a result, but when I explained what it was, they let it pass.
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #354 of 604
post #355 of 604
Quote:

SOMEONE was bound to predict some problem... just because the antenna was visible, someone was bound to explain how this will be a problem. And the man is a scientist, so I'm not going to doubt what he's said, however, he doesn't explain how/why the symptoms are able to be duplicated on the iPhone 3G, where the antenna is NOT touching skin.

via slashdot:
http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...ntenna_problem

I like this article better.
post #356 of 604
Quote:

The good professor has identified what we knew all along:

Exposing more of the antenna to the external environment including the hand will wreak havoc on signal quality and strength.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #357 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by chillin View Post

That's not science. You don't understand what a hypothesis is. That's not an experiment that means anything. There is no control.

The control was in the hand placement which stayed constant throughout the entire experiment, which showed intact voice quality. The variable was the extra finger moving down the side until it came into contact with the insulator portion. The observation was that once the finger progressed to the insulator portion, the reception/transmission was cut.

That's an experiment.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
Reply
post #358 of 604
Oh good, two more pages of bitching to read through.
post #359 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The control was in the hand placement which stayed constant throughout the entire experiment, which showed intact voice quality. The variable was the extra finger moving down the side until it came into contact with the insulator portion. The observation was that once the finger progressed to the insulator portion, the reception/transmission was cut.

That's an experiment.

Was the finger wet? Did he lick it first? Was it hot in the room, causing him to sweat? What was underneath the phone? Did he have a paper clip taped to his finger? You get the idea. YouTube is not an authoritative source for news and what folks are doing is hardly scientific. I'm not saying they aren't experiencing issues (they obviously are), but the cause has not been determined yet and everyone is just guessing (or assuming) it's the antennas when earlier models exhibiting the same symptoms would seem to indicate something else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by endgadget

"One iPhone 4 demonstrated the issue everytime it was held in our left hand (as a right-handed person is apt to do) so that our palm was essentially bridging the two antennas. You can see that in the video after the break. Bridging the two with a finger tip, however, didn't cause any issues with the reported reception. If we had to guess, we'd say that our conductive skin was acting to detune the antenna -- in fact, we've already managed to slowly kill two calls that way so it's not just an issue with the software erroneously reporting an incorrect signal strength. That said, we had no issues when Apple's $29 rubber bumper accessory (given to us free for standing in line) was attached, creating a buffer between our palm and the antennas. Our second UK-purchased iPhone 4 was fine, showing none of these handling symptoms. See the video evidence after the break including Insanely Great Mac's version which got us to worrying in the first place."

[Source]

There is obviously more going on here than just the external physical location of the antennas. The phones don't look physically different, yet some iPhone 4's exhibit symptoms and some do not (including 3G and 3GS), which don't have external antennas..
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
iMac 27" 2.8 Quad i7 / 24" Dual Core 3.06 / 17" Macbook Pro Unibody / Mac Mini HTPC / iPhone 4
Reply
post #360 of 604
Quote:
Originally Posted by chillin View Post

SOMEONE was bound to predict some problem... just because the antenna was visible, someone was bound to explain how this will be a problem. And the man is a scientist, so I'm not going to doubt what he's said, however, he doesn't explain how/why the symptoms are able to be duplicated on the iPhone 3G, where the antenna is NOT touching skin.

Skin touching is a separate issue, as he did say. Engadget even mentioned that. You're talking about attenuation of reception, like Steve said. They are two separate issues.

The videos shown it being reproduced on older iPhones, and i can do it on mine, require abnormal crowding of the phone. You can bring the iPhone 4 to it's knees with the touch of one finger on the side of the phone. Which just so happens to be where the phone is naturally held.

Now do you get it?
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of the rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Death Grip hysteria may end Monday with iOS 4.01