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Wireless experts weigh in on iPhone 4 reception issues - Page 3

post #81 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

You get what you pay for.

I find it funny that before the antenna problem you'd be hard pressed to find someone on this forum who *didn't* use a case, now that the easiest answer to the antenna issue is buying a case, no one wants to?

Also, almost every case I've ever seen is roughly 30 bucks. Sure, you can get cheaper ones, but 30 bucks is not "out of line," "over the top" or any one of those superlatives being dropped about them today.

Apple's bumper is probably one of the best designed cases out there, it's far from "an 18 cent piece off silicone" and probably cost a lot more to make than the junk on your link. It has integrated mechanical buttons for one thing, it has much higher manufacturing tolerances for another, and it's made out of a different material for a third.

You get what you pay for.

I've had an excellent case for my 3G from InCase and it has saved my phone on a few occasions. I'll be getting one from them as soon as they start shipping something that I like. Otherwise, I'll probably spring for the bumper case from Apple.
post #82 of 376
I have a Bumper and my iPhone 4 is working beautifully. My wife did not want a Bumper (she's waiting for others to ship) and she hasn't had any problems in casual use. Personally, I like the feel of the iPhone better with the Bumper than without. I'll be watching what Vaja Cases produces. The case I got from them for my 3G was the best, most striking case I've ever had.
post #83 of 376
Oops the first link is wrong it's actually this one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhsYk61Bzc0

Quote:
Originally Posted by tekbeattv View Post

Hey Guys,

Yea I posted a reception video on youtube as a sample to see the bars drop (mine drop FAST):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNHpvElnqmU

I also followed up with testing it with a case as well as making my way to a store to ask the fantastic apple reps:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbJDi5B7ibU

My conclusion is the same as the PH.D in the article, fantastic device, lousy phone capabilities .

Will

www.youtube.com/tekbeattv
www.tekbeattv.com
post #84 of 376
Megafail!


Quote:
Originally Posted by jschau View Post

Put a small piece of tape over the seam. Works for me.
post #85 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post

Dick Gaywood?

Edit: Removed by poster.
post #86 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

Thank you Rob.

For what it is worth, you are the first person here to identify themselves as actually having an iPhone 4. Which is already telling.

Not true. I know I've stated several times that I have an iPhone 4. Several others have, as well.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #87 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajectory View Post

Changing the way bars are displayed does not fix the antenna problem, it only changes the way signal strength is being reported by the phone. There is no software fix for this.

Yeah, but if you read the articles you'll find that in many cases the bars disappear but the signal actually doesn't. Also almost the whole point of what the first expert was saying was that the bar display is basically made up and can at times have no relation at all to whether the call is going to be dropped.

The problem is that people believe reception is a problem on the phone even though all objective tests say that reception is overall *better* on the iPhone 4 than on any other phone or any previous iPhone. In some cases, this perception of poor reception is accurate, in other cases, not.

It's a hardware/software/firmware problem and a software/firmware fix can solve a large part of it even though underlying problems created by the design of the product may remain for a few.
post #88 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddyp View Post

What has me concerned is that this is going to turn into Apple's Toyota moment.

Reports started to surface that there were problems with Toyota's automobiles.
Toyota said, dismissively, that there is absolutely nothing wrong with our cars.
There were a few instances of unintended acceleration and again Toyota says not our fault.
Unfortunately for Toyota the media latched onto the story and Toyota ends up with a black eye.
Most, but not all, of the unintended accidents were driver error. A few of them were a floor mat problem or a sticky gas pedal.

I think Toyotas mistake was that they appeared arrogant and that they didn't care about their customers safety. If they would have responded quicker and seemed a little more sympathetic they could have kept the publics trust.

I think that Apple's fetish for being secretive and their aloof attitude is going to come back to haunt them. Even though it looks like the phone is working as designed by Apple there are enough people ignorant of the whole story that I think this issue is going to continue to get bad press. When a company as successful as Apple seemingly makes a mistake the press and pundits will pile on them big time. Its part of human nature.

Schadenfreude.
Derived from the German words for harm and pleasure, it means the joy we sometimes cannot help but experience when we hear about another's misfortune.

And Apple suggestion to improve reception people use a case or better yet...buy a Apple bumper is truly a fail.

Bigdaddyp-

There is a huge PR difference between people dying and phone calls being dropped. This will NEVER turn into a Toyota moment. The drama of the outcome is the missing ingredient.

Having said that, I agree with your premise (i.e. that Apple's attitude on this could tarnish their reputation). I am not a big fan of the "don't hold it that way" answer. I'm not so much against the suggestion that people get a bumper. It will eventually save them some roughed up glass edges (at a minimum) and/or dinged-up metal sides.

-Thompson
post #89 of 376
I'd just like to clarify -- when I said it was a "lousy phone" I mean "a lousy device for making phone calls on", rather than "a lousy smartphone". Apart from the proximity sensor issues and these signal problems I'm ecstatic with my iPhone 4. Furthermore, the proximity sensor is (personally) probably more annoying than the signal problems and I have a hunch it will be fixed in a software update (I think it's a calibration problem).

Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

How do you explain Anand Shimpi's findings on the Nexus, when you are quoted as saying no other phones exhibit this behaviour?

Anand shows a drop of 10.7dB when held in the bare hand and 7.7dB when held in a case. I don't think the difference is significant; it's very slight compared to the 12.6dB difference between the iPhone 4 figures. Note that dB is a log scale unit, so these numbers actually reflect a small and quite large difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Anand at least made an attempt to measure things in a semi-controlled environment. and to implement controls. Gaywood did neither.

Ouch. I did what I could with the tools that I had, and (in my defence) I was upfront that my testing was limited and what those limits were.

Quote:
Note also, that Anand's conclusions were that the iPhone 4, even with its minor glitches was a considerably better phone than the iPhone 3GS - or any other phone on the market. And that was after a wide range of comparisons, not just Gaywood's one uncontrolled experiment.

Oh, they've definitely done a much better test than I have -- I have updated my original post to reflect that, and posted again since with a link to Anand's site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post

Whether others were involved in checking their work or if they worked alone. And I am troubled by the fact that Mr. Gaywood made a post here, the tone of which was something other than what I would expect of a serious researcher--a little starstruck and defensive it seemed to me.

Heh, dunno about defensive, but definitely starstruck. This doesn't happen to me a lot. My blog has had 10,000 hits in the last 24 hours; compared to about 3,000 for the whole of 2010 so far.

I worked alone, and no-one checked my findings. This blog post wouldn't pass a peer review process in a million years. And yet, I believe it was more rigorous than anything I'd read on the web until Anand's post today -- which is not intended to suggest I'm clever, so much as, why did no-one else try and do the really very basic things I did? In any event, I was honest about what I did and how I built my conclusions. That's how tyou do science.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Actually not. If you read closely, a large part of what the first expert said (and no offence to Richard Gaywood but he says in his own blog that he is actually *not* an antenna expert so the first expert is the one to really listen to)

No offence taken, you are correct to do so.

Quote:
So while the ultimate fix might be in the manufacturing, there is a fix for the firmware or software that might alleviate the problem a great deal. By changing the algorithm that determines the bars, they can hopefully fine tune it so that a large part of the problem goes away.

I don't think that's true. I would say that what Anand is saying is: part of this is a real problem, and part of it is a perceived problem that it worse than it is because the calibration of the bars is a little odd (with that very broad range of signal strengths mapped to five bars). Recalibration will make the problem look less odd, but it won't change the attenuation Anandtech measured one whit.

Now, as I say at the end of my piece, if the iPhone 4's "ungripped" reception is really good, the attenuation matters a lot less; basically, even when you're holding it, you still come out ahead. Anandtech have shown that to be partly the case. Based on that, they are saying this isn't a smaller issue than it might appear, and I am inclined to agree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Grow up.

I get that a lot. Even from Microsoft. It stopped bothering me a long time ago though; about a week after I started school in fact
post #90 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by desarc View Post

HA!

http://www.engadget.com/2010/06/30/a...r-some-reason/

Three Apple job postings for iPhone / iPad antenna engineers to "Define and implement antenna system architecture to optimize the radiation performance for wireless portable devices." All three were posted on June 23rd, the same day that we started seeing widespread reporting of the left-handed reception issues. Coincidence?


My daughter met two Apple engineers while vacationing in Hawaii a few weeks ago. They said when Apple was developing Aperture, Jobs was so displeased with the lack of progress, he walked in and told everyone to collect their things and leave, you're fired!
post #91 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onhka View Post

Thank you Rob.

For what it is worth, you are the first person here to identify themselves as actually having an iPhone 4. Which is already telling.

What is "telling" is that you claim someone reporting no issues with the iPhone 4 to be the only person giving a hands-on review. Clearly you're adopting the classic head-in-sand approach to the numerous other reports on Appleinsider (and elsewhere) from owners of the iPhone 4 who ARE having problems.

I can only hope Apple is not taking the same approach as you (though Jobs and Apple's initial responses were very disconcerting).
post #92 of 376
Has anyone bothered to include the height & weight of the testers in their results of iPhone4 signal testing? Or maybe Body Mass Index? It seems like the density and thickness of any surface obstructing the wireless signals may affect the results. Skeletor Steve Jobs may never have any signal loss since he is so thin & frail, but your average American fatty might see problems, and a sumo wrestler might not get any signal at all.
post #93 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardGaywood View Post

Now, as I say at the end of my piece, if the iPhone 4's "ungripped" reception is really good, the attenuation matters a lot less; basically, even when you're holding it, you still come out ahead. Anandtech have shown that to be partly the case. Based on that, they are saying this isn't a smaller issue than it might appear, and I am inclined to agree.

Which helps dispel the notion that this couldn't be a design flaw and was a limited production issue because all owners were not affected equally.

Either way, we are now paying for Apple's secret handshake method of doing business and are still in the dark regarding how/when Apple intends on addressing this.

Full disclosure: I still intend on buying two iPhone 4's for my wife and out-of-town daughter late next month, if the issues are resolved by then. I'm also glad I bailed on the long reserved line on Day One and did not pick up a phone then.
post #94 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

Or return it and buy a different phone. Sheesh!

Or here's a thought, maybe expect and hope for a fix. duh!

Quote:
Originally Posted by John.B View Post

What do you care anyway, don't you use an Android phone?

No, do you? (what an incredibly stupid post for you to make)
iPhone 3G, thanks for asking. When it becomes available in Canada, I will buy the iPhone 4. Liking and wanting an Apple product shouldn't mean blindly accepting or ignoring its faults...that would be ignorant.

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post #95 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giffen View Post

This is a very minor issue that will only have ANY impact if you are not in an area with decent 3G coverage to start with, and the Nexus wouldn't be much better off either.

Unfortunatly logic and reason are not nearly as fun as blowing things out of proportion and giving them cactchy names like "death grip"

Quote:
All in all it's very very minor and if it was an issue for some people they can get the Apple bumpers and then they will end up with even better reception than the competing smartphones.

But it's the principle of the thing! The phone should be perfect! I shouldn't have to accept any compromises - ever!

post #96 of 376
Received iPhone 4 last Wednesday. Have dropped several calls at my home...which NEVER happend with my 3gs.

Called Apple tech support last Thursday to let them know of signal strength problems. They sent me a new iPhone 4 and a complimentary bumper (which I haven't received yet).

The replacement iPhone exhibits the same behavior. I can have 4-5 bars showing while I'm not touching it or holding it loosely. I pick it up or grip it in my left hand (as I would normally hold it while checking email or internet) and it slowly drops bars. Sometimes even down to "searching" or "no service." And their really is no service, no calls and no data (unless I'm on Wifi).

Called tech support back to let them know there is no change with the new phone. I was told this is how the phone was designed. I expressed my disappointment.

Will wait for bumper to arrive to decide if I will return.

Other than signal issue...love the iPhone 4.
post #97 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardGaywood View Post

I'd just like to clarify --

Thanks for the clarification. You addressed all my concerns with good humor. A pleasure to engage with you; you're quite a guy.
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post #98 of 376
In any case do not hold it in any way in the restrooms. The signal over there is always weak and the ambient noise can be unbearable. It is also hygiene problem.
post #99 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by msimpson View Post

Has anyone bothered to include the height & weight of the testers in their results of iPhone4 signal testing? Or maybe Body Mass Index? It seems like the density and thickness of any surface obstructing the wireless signals may affect the results. Skeletor Steve Jobs may never have any signal loss since he is so thin & frail, but your average American fatty might see problems, and a sumo wrestler might not get any signal at all.

An interesting take if you are being serious, and humorous even if you're not. But "Skeletor"? Come on. Can't we leave his actual life-threatening health issues off the joke table? At least for a while longer, until he's proven to be a survivor? He's not beyond criticism and jibes, but let's stick to faults he can control, not those he can't. A little human decency is all I ask.
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post #100 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardGaywood View Post

I'd just like to clarify -- when I said it was a "lousy phone" I mean "a lousy device for making phone calls on", rather than "a lousy smartphone". Apart from the proximity sensor issues and these signal problems I'm ecstatic with my iPhone 4. Furthermore, the proximity sensor is (personally) probably more annoying than the signal problems and I have a hunch it will be fixed in a software update (I think it's a calibration problem).

Anand shows a drop of 10.7dB when held in the bare hand and 7.7dB when held in a case. I don't think the difference is significant; it's very slight compared to the 12.6dB difference between the iPhone 4 figures. Note that dB is a log scale unit, so these numbers actually reflect a small and quite large difference.

Ouch. I did what I could with the tools that I had, and (in my defence) I was upfront that my testing was limited and what those limits were.

Oh, they've definitely done a much better test than I have -- I have updated my original post to reflect that, and posted again since with a link to Anand's site.

Heh, dunno about defensive, but definitely starstruck. This doesn't happen to me a lot. My blog has had 10,000 hits in the last 24 hours; compared to about 3,000 for the whole of 2010 so far.

I worked alone, and no-one checked my findings. This blog post wouldn't pass a peer review process in a million years. And yet, I believe it was more rigorous than anything I'd read on the web until Anand's post today -- which is not intended to suggest I'm clever, so much as, why did no-one else try and do the really very basic things I did? In any event, I was honest about what I did and how I built my conclusions. That's how tyou do science.

No offence taken, you are correct to do so.

I don't think that's true. I would say that what Anand is saying is: part of this is a real problem, and part of it is a perceived problem that it worse than it is because the calibration of the bars is a little odd (with that very broad range of signal strengths mapped to five bars). Recalibration will make the problem look less odd, but it won't change the attenuation Anandtech measured one whit.

Now, as I say at the end of my piece, if the iPhone 4's "ungripped" reception is really good, the attenuation matters a lot less; basically, even when you're holding it, you still come out ahead. Anandtech have shown that to be partly the case. Based on that, they are saying this isn't a smaller issue than it might appear, and I am inclined to agree.

I get that a lot. Even from Microsoft. It stopped bothering me a long time ago though; about a week after I started school in fact



3dB is half of power. It is not small. That's why we, engineers, have logarithmic expression of power just to compress large drop/increase.
post #101 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Not true. I know I've stated several times that I have an iPhone 4. Several others have, as well.

I was referring to the survey.

Would be interested in your observations as well.
post #102 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazda 3s View Post

WOW. I never thought AI had it in 'em to post an article that paints the iPhone 4 in such a negative light.

At least AI isn't acting like people are creating a mass "hysteria" anymore.

It's two people not every 'expert' out there. So it's really not that negative.

And it is still pretty much 'hysteria' because no one can validate the actual number, without double hits, lying etc. And show that the number is actually anything close to large enough to declare a major design flaw. Very very few people, compared to the 1.7 million phones reportedly sold have 100% problems no matter where they are and how they hold the phone etc. And still very few have any problems at all.

When you can prove numbers that are even 5% of all the phones at least 50% of the time regardless of grip, reception in the area, use of a case etc then you can start talking about a serious flaw. Until then it is 'hysteria' to call this a major issue that Apple needs to fix right now, replace all phones, stop production, free cases or whatever else folks are shouting

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post #103 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by maciekskontakt View Post

3dB is half of power. It is not small. That's why we, engineers, have logarithmic expression of power just to compress large drop/increase.

I am sure Mr. Gaywood stands humbly in the shadow of your erudition.
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post #104 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Yeah, but if you read the articles you'll find that in many cases the bars disappear but the signal actually doesn't. Also almost the whole point of what the first expert was saying was that the bar display is basically made up and can at times have no relation at all to whether the call is going to be dropped.

The problem is that people believe reception is a problem on the phone even though all objective tests say that reception is overall *better* on the iPhone 4 than on any other phone or any previous iPhone. In some cases, this perception of poor reception is accurate, in other cases, not.

It's a hardware/software/firmware problem and a software/firmware fix can solve a large part of it even though underlying problems created by the design of the product may remain for a few.

I can place my pinky on the little black strip and cut off all downloads to the device. I get 0kbps when I touch the black band, but when I let go... boom, I got 1.5mbps. I think that's worrying. So no, it's not just about bars... it's about stopping data and calls all together. It sucks, but that's the way it is for me. Also, I don't even have to grip it tight... just rest my pinky finger on the black strip.

I'm glad you think there's not a bad problem.
post #105 of 376
yes i realize this is my first post, so take it for what it's worth, but you can add me to the list of those who haven't had any issues.

i upgraded from an original iphone 2g and couldn't be happier!
post #106 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tulkas View Post

The difference, I think, isn't that Apple hasn't solved it. They are being pilloried because they won't even acknowledge it. Maybe Dick and Anand are wrong and Jobs is right and there is no problem. If, however, there is a problem unique to the design of the iPhone 4, then they deserve to be called on it, if they choose instead to simply deny the problem.

I agree with you, but Apple has to be very careful in what they say because of legal and regulatory ramifications.

Don't you think that all those Congressmen, all running for reelection in November, would love to bask in the FaceTime [sic] glory of skewering Steve Jobs on live TV, then replayed, ad nauseam, on the newscasts. Mmmm... Perfect! They can schedule the hearings after the July recess, say, mid-October.

.
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post #107 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plagen View Post

I guess, you missed the part where I intentionally dead short it with a metal coin and still don't have a substantial drop in the connectivity. So, all the theories of 'shorting' the gap with skin don't hold water.

You have to understand electronics. A metal coin offers little in regards to resistance. Human digits however introduce resistance. A coin that shorts two antennas together that are broadcasting the same signal is different than putting a resistive load between them. The Coin essentially becomes part of the antenna, your fingers drain power from them. It's not so unbelieveable that a coin wouldn't hurt them much, where your finger would.
post #108 of 376
IDC
IM still getting one by the time they get to Canada Problem fix
post #109 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

These problems are so obvious, Apple surely had a contingency plan.

I completely agree, Foo2. I've been saying it since this "non-issue" became an issue. I truly believe that it's more than-a-coincidence that Apple's first attempt at a case/bumper was for this particular iPhone.
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post #110 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by thespaz View Post

I can place my pinky on the little black strip and cut off all downloads to the device. I get 0kbps when I touch the black band, but when I let go... boom, I got 1.5mbps. I think that's worrying. So no, it's not just about bars... it's about stopping data and calls all together. It sucks, but that's the way it is for me. Also, I don't even have to grip it tight... just rest my pinky finger on the black strip.

This is really the crux of the matter. All this discussion of attenuation caused by gripping it this way or that is really just a distraction, that isn't really going to be that problematic. This problem, however, is the one that does need to be examined, explained and addressed.
post #111 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

My daughter met two Apple engineers while vacationing in Hawaii a few weeks ago. They said when Apple was developing Aperture, Jobs was so displeased with the lack of progress, he walked in and told everyone to collect their things and leave, you're fired!

This is consistent with other reports of Steve's employee relations:

Quote:
No one greets him or says hi to him. Low ranking employees are afraid of him. I remember him walking around the campus one time and groups of people in his way would just split and let him walk through.

http://www.businessinsider.com/apple...-return-2009-8
post #112 of 376
What are the first 5 digits of everyone with an iPhone 4?
Mine is: 88022
Factory: 88 . .= ???
. .Year: . 0 . = 2010
. .Week: . .22 = May 30thJune 5th?
Does anyone have more detailed info and is there yet a site that is detailing which serial numbers are affected?


Quote:
Originally Posted by drk_one View Post

I completely agree, Foo2. I've been saying it since this "non-issue" became an issue. I truly believe that it's more than-a-coincidence that Apple's first attempt at a case/bumper was for this particular iPhone.

Your argument is Apple purposely built a phone that would have signal issues from being held (even though this isn't happening in all iPhone 4s) so they could sell you a $30 case? What about the case they made for the iPad? What about the fact they don't ship a Bumper with every iPhone as the proper way to use the device? What about Bumpers being in such short supply compared to iPhones? Nothing suggests that Apple's decision to make the Bumpers was to pull a "fast one' over the consumer because they knew you could "short out" your reception by touching metal.
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post #113 of 376
In my opinion these issues are equivallent to buying a new car that's missing a tire. I think Apple needs to step up and take care of it's customers and not take advantage of them.

Find discount cell phones online.
post #114 of 376
I don't trust these "marginal areas" because there is too much flux .

How's about a controlled test. Like say inside a giant, shielded room with it's own cell tower and with the proper testing equipment on both the iPhone and cell tower side??

These test are too anecdotal.
post #115 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalTroll View Post

This is consistent with other reports of Steve's employee relations:


http://www.businessinsider.com/apple...-return-2009-8

Fear is a better motivator than reverence. I guarantee you the job for antenna engineer hirings are due to people who've been fired.

I think that someone else put it best; Apple is one man's toy factory.
post #116 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Your argument is Apple purposely built a phone that would have signal issues from being held (even though this isn't happening in all iPhone 4s) so they could sell you a $30 case? What about the case they made for the iPad? What about the fact they don't ship a Bumper with every iPhone as the proper way to use the device? What about Bumpers being in such short supply compared to iPhones? Nothing suggests that Apple's decision to make the Bumpers was to pull a "fast one' over the consumer because they knew you could "short out" your reception by touching metal.

Of course they didn't purposely build a phone with this issue. My personal opinion is that this antenna issue was noticed far too late in the designing/production process. Thus they came up with this cheaper solution instead of redesigning and delaying the iPhone 4. They took a chance this issue would not get the attention it is now receiving. It's just too much of a coincidence that this is the first time Apple has produced a case. And the case only covers the antenna.
post #117 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQB View Post

Right.
People are dying because they can't skootch their hand a millimeter one way or the other.

I've never seen such screwed up priorities and childish whining as I have in the past week.

You obviously don't have a iPhone, and if that's the case; might I suggest that you are a brain-dead fanboi. When you have a dog in the fight, then your opinion isn't a waste of bandwidth.

I have a iPhone, and I can't use it while I'm at work. I've had it since the day it was released, and left Verizon (that had fantastic coverage) because I assumed Apple knew what it was doing - especially since this is the 4th generation device.

If you would trouble yourself to READ and THINK (yeah, both at the same time); you'd know that the antennae in question runs along the bottom of the phone, and along the left hand of the phone. So, how to you hold a cell phone on 2 adjacent sides?

What's the difference if I hold it in my left or my right hand? That's bogus. The antennae that I need to use for cell phones is the long antenna that includes the volume buttons; this antennae cannot be shorted to the antenna that runs along the bottom of the phone.

So, how does one hold a rectangular phone if you cannot touch the bottom of the phone and the side? Now, I have 4 fingers and a thumb (maybe other people don't - but I do) on each hand. When I pick up anything, I grab adjacent sides and the bottom of the phone in a casual grip. If I do not grab the bottom of the phone, there is the possibility of the phone slipping through my fingers and dropping on the floor.

If I grab the bottom of the phone, and only the right hand side, then the phone can easily fall out of my hands - so that's not practical either.

I bought a $30 case, and WITH THE CASE IN PLACE - I don't drop bars as easily as before; but I still have lousy coverage depending upon what direction the phone faces. So, might I inject that part of the problem is that the antennae is inherently directional in nature.

Where this should be a omni-directional antennae; the iPhone appears to have directional characteristics.
post #118 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

What are the first 5 digits of everyone with an iPhone 4?
Mine is: 88022
Factory: 88 . .= ???
. .Year: . 0 . = 2010
. .Week: . .22 = May 30thJune 5th?
Does anyone have more detailed info and is there yet a site that is detailing which serial numbers are affected?

Also 88022 here - UK iPhone 4 purchased from the online Apple store

Could anyone with an iPhone which *doesn't* exhibit the issue confirm if the first five digits of their serial number matches or not?
post #119 of 376
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glockman View Post

Hats off to AppleInsider for this forum post and thread. Both reports from these independents describe my problems exactly since I unboxed my beloved iP4 1 week ago.

iJobz cannot keep insulting us with his denial and useless rhetoric forever!

Fix this freaking problem!

Return your freaking phone and buy something else! With your opinion of Jobs and Apple I have to wonder why you and your comrades are still lurking and screaming. Why in the hell are you still an Apple customer? Do you actually like dealing with what you consider to be an evil corporation with no feelings or concerns for its customers? Aren't you and others displaying classic symptoms of battered spouse syndrome and Stockholm syndrome. It sure does look that way to me. How utterly sick. Do business with a company you respect instead of sticking with one you consider the personification of evil. God there are physiologically sick people in this forum.
post #120 of 376
Sure, my IP4 also drops bars (but still has signal) if I bridge the gap...

I just hold it so that I don't bridge the gap and it works perfectly. If I had the choice between sleek stainless steel band and perfect reception, I'd choose the former because the phone works just fine, no matter how it's held.

I kinda agree with Job's response. How difficult is it to just slide the phone 1/2 inch down to clear the gap?!

Total crybabies. And the comparison with Toyota - ridiculous. As if 2 dropped bars equal run-away acceleration of a car. LOL!
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