or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Its "improve Anders´ english" week!!!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Its "improve Anders´ english" week!!!

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Its time for all you who are anal about grammar, spelling and general accuracy in english to live out your own inner english teacher

I have noticed that my english has deteriorated over the last couple of years and its about time to do something about it. So for the next week I want you to nick-pick every post I make and show to me (and the world) all the wrongs in them.

So please: If you see a post made by me anywhere in AI please quote it here and write the what I should have written if it should have been 100% correct.
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
post #2 of 23
grammar, spelling and general accuracy
should be
grammar, spelling, and general accuracy

It has been taught in more recent years that you should use a final comma as in the above example so that every single item is properly separated. The reason here is that the last two items of a list could be mistaken as one. Perhaps an example will explain this premise better.

"Some of his favorite foods are fried chicken, hamburgers, pizza, macaroni and cheese, and potato salad."

In this example, if there was no comma before the last item, it could be read that either "macaroni and cheese and potato salad" is a single dish or that "cheese and potato salad" is a dish.

See?

As I understand it, this method has only been widely taught since the 1980's; thus, many adults use the traditional way. The traditional way may not be wrong, but this way is far easier to read and is becoming more widely used.

[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: starfleetX ]</p>
post #3 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by Anders:
<strong>Its time for all you who are anal about grammar, spelling and general accuracy in english to live out your own inner english teacher

I have noticed that my english has deteriorated over the last couple of years and its about time to do something about it. So for the next week I want you to nick-pick every post I make and show to me (and the world) all the wrongs in them.

So please: If you see a post made by me anywhere in AI please quote it here and write the what I should have written if it should have been 100% correct.</strong><hr></blockquote>

The same applies to me, but i doubt that many of you will have the courage to quote me all day long
post #4 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by Anders:
<strong>
I have noticed that my english has deteriorated over the last couple of years and its about time to do something about it. So for the next week I want you to nick-pick every post I make and show to me (and the world) all the wrongs in them.
</strong><hr></blockquote>

It's "nitpick" and instead of "all the wrongs" it should be "all the errors". I only did this because you asked. I'm no great shakes when it comes to grammar. <img src="graemlins/embarrassed.gif" border="0" alt="[Embarrassed]" />
shooby doo, shooby doo
Reply
shooby doo, shooby doo
Reply
post #5 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by starfleetX:
<strong>grammar, spelling and general accuracy
should be
grammar, spelling, and general accuracy</strong><hr></blockquote>Yeah, I always use the last comma. But you still see the last comma dropped in newspapers and magazines, who presumably are up on their grammar. I'm wondering if there's some other exception to that.
post #6 of 23
We only have a week? <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
post #7 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by BRussell:
<strong>Yeah, I always use the last comma. But you still see the last comma dropped in newspapers and magazines, who presumably are up on their grammar. I'm wondering if there's some other exception to that.</strong><hr></blockquote>

StarfleetX's right on the money w/ his explanation. The dropped last comma syndrome is common in legal writing - its almost a requirement it seems. However, the trend seems to be to separate individual items in a list. I always use commas for every member of a list. However, the judge that I work for does not, nor does our secretary.
Amazing how plastic the rules of our languange seem to be.
Thoth.
PS: If there are grammatical errors in this post, please feel free to ignore them.
<img src="graemlins/oyvey.gif" border="0" alt="[No]" />

PPS: By the way, Anders, "english" is more properly spelled "English."

[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: Thoth2 ]</p>
You can fly?!?
No. Jump good.
Reply
You can fly?!?
No. Jump good.
Reply
post #8 of 23
For names ending in -s:
In speaking we add the sound /ª z/ to the name, but in writing it is possible to use either 's or just '. The 's form is more common. e.g. Thomas's book, James's shop.


Anders' English
Anders's English

Either way is acceptable, but most grammar books seem to prefer "Anders's"
FYI.
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
20" iMac G5, 2 GB Ram, OS X 10.4.11, .Mac
Reply
post #9 of 23
<strong>Originally posted by Anders:
Its time for all you who are anal about grammar, spelling and general accuracy in english to live out your own inner english teacher </strong>

"Its" should be "It's". I make this sort of mistake all the time. You need a period after teacher. "all you" could be stated as "all of you" if you are anal. I'm ok with the serial comma, that is, the comma before the "and". I usually leave that comma out when the comma separates a series of nouns or adjectives. If the series consists of prepositional phrases or other more complex elements, I use the comma.

The "English" part has been taken care of by others.

<strong>I have noticed that my english has deteriorated over the last couple of years and its about time to do something about it. So for the next week I want you to nick-pick every post I make and show to me (and the world) all the wrongs in them.</strong>

"its" should be "it's" again. You need a comma before the "and" in your first sentence, but you're fine with no comma in the second sentence.

<strong>So please: If you see a post made by me anywhere in AI please quote it here and write the what I should have written if it should have been 100% correct.</strong>

You should use a comma instead of a colon. You need a comma after "AI". The "the" in "write the what" is not needed. I do that sometimes to. Lastly, you don't need to write "if it should have been 100% correct" because it is redundant.

[Edit: Corrected some mistakes for myself. ]

[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: THT ]</p>
post #10 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by THT:
<strong>You need a comma after "AI".</strong><hr></blockquote>You should have the period inside the quotes.


(If you're in the US, anyway.)

Here's another: When do you use the apostrophe-s to make a word plural? Lots of people use it for acronyms, like "I have two IRA's," but even that's wrong.
post #11 of 23
Ok, I looked up the apostrophe rule. The rule is that for singular nouns not ending in s, you add an apostrophe s to make it possessive. Easy. For plural nouns ending in s, the rule is that you add only an apostrophe. Easy enough. For a singular noun ending in s, the rule is that you add an apostrophe s, unless the resulting word would be hard to pronounce. Thus, "Yeats's" and "Chris's" are correct while "Euripedes's" and Oedipus's" are not. I probably spelled those wrong, but there it is.
So, Anders' is ok b/c Anders's would be hard to pronounce. Of course, that could be in the mouth of the speaker.
Thoth.
You can fly?!?
No. Jump good.
Reply
You can fly?!?
No. Jump good.
Reply
post #12 of 23
<strong>Originally posted by BRussell:
You should have the period inside the quotes.


(If you're in the US, anyway.)

Here's another: When do you use the apostrophe-s to make a word plural? Lots of people use it for acronyms, like "I have two IRA's," but even that's wrong.</strong>

I'm pretty sure I'm ok with leaving the period, or other punctuation, outside of one quoted word. If it was a sentence, then I need to.

As for making words and acronyms plural, I'm also pretty sure the answer is that you don't use an apostrophe to make words plural. For words ending with the letter "s", you add "es" unless there is a specific plural form for the word.

[Edit: The faster I write, the more mistakes I make. Sigh. ]

[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: THT ]</p>
post #13 of 23
People need to know the basic difference between these word and their proper usage:

To, too, and two.
They're, their, and there.
Of and off.

'Cannot' is one word.

These are just some of my pet-peeves.
post #14 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by THT:
You should use a comma instead of a colon. You need a comma after "AI". The "the" in "write the what" is not needed. I do that sometimes to. Lastly, you don't need to write "if it should have been 100% correct" because it is redundant.

[Edit: Corrected some mistakes for myself. ] <hr></blockquote>

Your use of the word "to" is incorrect. The use is "too" as in also, not "to" as in a place you are going.

Sorry, all this nitpicking in your post really made this error stand out. Go ahead tear apart my post as well. Anyone bold enough to pick apart anyone elses grammar should be willing to submit to the same scrutiny.

[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: NoahJ ]</p>
NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
Reply
NoahJ
"It is unwise to be too sure of one's own wisdom. It is healthy to be reminded that the strongest might weaken and the wisest might err." - Mahatma Gandhi
Reply
post #15 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by BRussell:
<strong>Yeah, I always use the last comma. But you still see the last comma dropped in newspapers and magazines, who presumably are up on their grammar. I'm wondering if there's some other exception to that.</strong><hr></blockquote>

Use of the serial comma is considered a "house style," as in, it depends who you work for. Most book publishers follow The Chicago Manual of Style, which dictates useage of the serial comma; most newspapers and magazines follow the Associated Press Style Guide which does not use the serial comma.
I was promised flying cars. Where are the flying cars?
Reply
I was promised flying cars. Where are the flying cars?
Reply
post #16 of 23
<strong>Originally posted by NoahJ:
Sorry, all this nitpicking in your post really made this error stand out.</strong>

No problem. Like I said, I do it sometimes two.
post #17 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by THT:
<strong>[qb]Originally posted by NoahJ:
Sorry, all this nitpicking in your post really made this error stand out.</strong>

No problem. Like I said, I do it sometimes two. [/QB]<hr></blockquote>

<img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
post #18 of 23
Fewer people post here today than did a year ago NOT Less people . . .

BUT There is less money around today than there was a year ago.

See the difference?

- T.I.
post #19 of 23
[quote]Anyone bold enough to pick apart anyone elses grammar should be willing to submit to the same scrutiny.<hr></blockquote>

I believe "elses" should be "else's" instead.
*Registered March 1, 1999*
Member #14
Reply
*Registered March 1, 1999*
Member #14
Reply
post #20 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by BRussell:
<strong>Here's another: When do you use the apostrophe-s to make a word plural? Lots of people use it for acronyms, like "I have two IRA's," but even that's wrong.</strong><hr></blockquote>Ah yes, that's another common question.

You can use apostrophes on numbers and acronyms to make them plural. Many people are confused on this use, but I am quite certain that it is valid in both cases, whether you do or don't use it. When I was in high school, I was on our English academic debate team and we once had a minor argument about the proper uses of apostrophes. This part was integral to the discussion.

"The Power Mac 9600's were sweet towers because they had six PCI slots."
"The IBM's in our lab were underpowered compared to the new iMacs."

Both of these examples are a-okay.

However, note that "iMacs" has no apostrophe.
Never use an apostrophe to make a name like "Mac" plural!!

[ 04-25-2002: Message edited by: starfleetX ]</p>
post #21 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by radar1503:
<strong>

I believe "elses" should be "else's" instead. </strong><hr></blockquote>Should that not be instead of

- T.I. <img src="graemlins/lol.gif" border="0" alt="[Laughing]" />
post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
So I must conclude that my english is perfect? Noone have found any post by me in other threads worth correcting here. Cool :cool:

GET YOUR COLLECTIVE ASS IN GEAR AND DO SOME CORRECTING <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" />
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
"I reject your reality and substitute it with my own" - President Bush
Reply
post #23 of 23
[quote]Originally posted by Anders:
So I must conclude that my english is perfect?<hr></blockquote>

This is an awkward phrase. I would recommend changing, "I must conclude," to "am I to conclude."

Optional but recommended: add a comma after "So" as in, "So, am I to conclude..." Traditionally, introductory clauses are separated by commas from the rest of a sentence. The current trend, however, is to reduce the ammount of punctuation appearing on a page, and so introductory-clause commas are often ommitted as long as no confusion results. IMO, this makes for an inconsistant read, and I would recommend placing commas after introductory phrases as a rule of thumb.

Also, "english" should be spelled with a capital "E" as in, "English."

[quote]Noone have found<hr></blockquote>

There is a spelling mistake here. If "Noone" should be "No one," then "have" should be changed to "has" in order to agree with the subject: "No one has found..."

If "Noone" should be "None," then the phrase is awkward. I would recommend rephrasing as above.

[quote]any post by me<hr></blockquote>

Awkward and ambiguous construction. I would recommend rephrasing to, "any errors in my posts," in order to clarify what people are to find.

[quote]in other threads<hr></blockquote>

I would recommend deleting this because it is understood that you are asking about posts from other threads. At a minimum, I would recommend changing "in" to "from."

[quote]worth correcting here.<hr></blockquote>

In this phrase, "worth" places a condition on the sentence which is to only correct posts one deems "worth correcting."

As "worth" is a subjective value (i.e., there are presumably those who do not even find your posts "worth" reading ), I would recommend rephrasing, "worth correcting" to, "to correct." I would also recommend deleting "here," which is implied.

[quote]Cool :cool: <hr></blockquote>

Because the smiley :cool: already means "cool," having both is redundant; one or the other may be deleted.

[quote]GET YOUR COLLECTIVE ASS IN GEAR AND DO SOME CORRECTING
<hr></blockquote>

There are two problems with this sentence: an agreement problem between the adjective "collective" (which is plural here) and the noun "ass" (which is singular here), and the awkward phrase, "do some correcting." The solution depends on the directness and strength of phrasing desired:

"GET YOUR ASS IN GEAR AND START CORRECTING"

This is a very strong sentence because it addresses a reader directly.

"GET YOUR COLLECTIVE ASSES IN GEAR AND MAKE SOME CORRECTIONS"

This is a somewhat less-strong sentence than above because it does not address our individual asses directly, but rather the implied, third-person "collective" AI readership, of which our individual asses comprise. "Make some corrections" is also a more passive phrase than "start correcting" is.

In summary, two possible rewrites could be:

[quote]So, am I to conclude that my English is perfect? No one has found any errors in my posts to correct? :cool:

GET YOUR ASS IN GEAR AND START CORRECTING <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <hr></blockquote>

or

[quote]So, am I to conclude that my English is perfect? No one has found any errors in my posts from other threads to correct? :cool:

GET YOUR COLLECTIVE ASSES IN GEAR AND MAKE SOME CORRECTIONS <img src="graemlins/smokin.gif" border="0" alt="[Chilling]" /> <hr></blockquote>

depending on the overall tone desired.

(I would have added more smilies, but I seem to have reached the limit of eight-per-post...)

[ 04-29-2002: Message edited by: jesperas ]

[ 04-30-2002: Message edited by: jesperas ]</p>
I was promised flying cars. Where are the flying cars?
Reply
I was promised flying cars. Where are the flying cars?
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Its "improve Anders´ english" week!!!