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Apple deletes discussion threads about Consumer Reports and iPhone 4 - Page 2

post #41 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

Exactly, CR does this all the time as new info comes in. Unlike a certain phone maker, it's called being responsible.

Agreed, they heard about the complaints; Tested to see if they were valid.
They were.
post #42 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

When I was in DC, I was unable to replicate the Grip of Death. The DC metro area has great coverage. But, here at home, if I dare to touch the phone - even hold it in my palm without the case - I cannot complete a 5 minute phone call without dropping the call, and then the dreaded "Searching".

So, as long as you stay in a coverage area with full bars; you are fine. But, go into a basement, tunnel or a more remote area and you too will discover the joys of dropped calls.

BTW, if you disable the 3G - you will get about 12 dB better cell reception; based on experiments I did at my desk.

Most cell phones will drop if you go into a basement, tunnel or a more remote area. That's the nature of cell phones.
post #43 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

iPhone competitors better learn to innovate if they want to compete. Dirty politics is not gonna cut it.

The iPhone will continue to outsell the competition by far because it is the best!

Time will tell.

They are far too busy joining blogs like this to make up stories to innovate.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #44 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

iPhone competitors better learn to innovate if they want to compete.

Apple needs to innovate some antenna reception to compete with other phone makers.
Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
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Fragmentation is not just something we have to acknowledge and accept. Fragmentation is something that we deal with every day, and we must accept it as a fact of the iPhone platform experience.

Ste...
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post #45 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Such a 180 degrees change of opinion is just ridiculous. Especially when the first opinion was clearly explained that all phones do this to various degrees.

Yes, all cell phones exhibit signal attenuation to some degree depending on how they're held. The iPhone 4 exhibits it to an extreme, when held naturally.
Quote:
Moreover numerous YouTube videos show that the bar drops do not even degrade the voice quality of calls and Apple explained that it is a software issue that they plan to fix.

If the signal is strong enough, it won't be completely suppressed by the death grip.
Apple never claimed that fixing the "stunning" bars software issue will fix the signal attenuation problem of the iPhone 4.
post #46 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

The initial report was a preliminary report and had not underwent any extensive testing. Are you seriously doubting the integrity of Consumer Reports or are you disagreeing with anything negative about Apple? If that is the case then you should also consider dismissing all of their reviews of Apple products in which they've always been rated best in class.

I definitely DO question CRs integrity, and have for years. Don't forget, they were the hard core Toyota sycophants for years too. We all know how "Toyota Quality" has turned out in real life as opposed to CRs fantasy review land. They also were very critical of Macs for many years, writing patently false reviews riddled with factual errors. As well, they've been responsible for many false health and safety scares over the years.

Anyone who already knows anything about a product that CR reviews can tell you that they do not know what they are talking about, and never have. Consumers Reports is not a credible source of information about ANYTHING.
post #47 of 169
Just posted this to another thread...

This confuses me???


Haven't read all the posts-- just a few of the first and a few of the last.

Forgive me if this has already been posted:


Consumer Reports: "By the Way, the iPhone 4 is Also the Best Smartphone on the Market"

http://digitaldaily.allthingsd.com/2...on-the-market/

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
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"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
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post #48 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hodar View Post

But, your statement about returning the iPhone is deeply flawed. First off, there is a 10% re-stocking fee - then if I leave AT&T I get a $325 fee for breaking the contract. So, my out of pocket fee is ~$400; not including the $100 I paid AT&T and the $200 I paid for my defective iPhone (and yes, an antenna that shorts out when you touch the phone is a defective product).

No, there is no restocking fee. I paid nothing to return mine, and they refunded my protective cover charge and the Applecare charge (which they weren't obligated to do. ATT went out of their way to help me reverse the iP4 purchase. I'm back to my original 3Gs and original contract term, which ends in Sept. If they fix the hardware issue, I'll be back for the new version. My 3Gs is lame by comparison in every way but decreased signal strength when touching the dreaded "3G Spot" (sorry bout that ladies).
post #49 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by technohermit View Post

I have an iPhone 4 without these symptoms. Unfortunately for you, I know 4 other people with iPhone 4, and none---not a single one---have the death grip problem. I had a bad radio in my 3G when it came out, but luckily I was able to get a replacement. It seems this is either a bad run out of the factory, or another issue...but not a design flaw as you have incorrectly asserted. If it were, surely every phone would exhibit the symptoms.

Apple does not respond to these things until they know what the real problem is, and know exactly how to deliver a solid solution. Give it a little time, and I'm sure you'll be satisfied. The demand for this phone is unlike any other, but as it dies down, and Apple has some in stock, I'm sure they would gladly replace it for you.

Wow, please, pretty please read up on this issue then comment. No one says it happens all the time. What they do say is it happens when in a week signal area. Apple says you may not know that you are in a weak signal area because of software that determines how many bars are displayed. Then the real question is does the death grip lower the reception more than other phones, the ones with complaints say yes, and that's the flaw.
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post #50 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Some very heavyweights are seriously influencing the "Consumer Reports" management.

Such a 180 degrees change of opinion is just ridiculous. Especially when the first opinion was clearly explained that all phones do this to various degrees. Moreover numerous YouTube videos show that the bar drops do not even degrade the voice quality of calls and Apple explained that it is a software issue that they plan to fix.

These heavyweights can push against Apple but it's not gonna work because most everyone has the iPhone and can judge for themselves. They've also had 30 days to return it and have chosen not to do so because it's an awesome mobile phone.

Consumer Report's flip flop only proves to me that they can be bought and their reports should be taken with a grain of salt.

The next iOS update will fix this issue and the world won't need consumer reports to filp flop again since they have been bought and paid for.

Time will tell.

So, if I follow the logic on this, and Consumer Reports can be "bought", that means Apple paid them for the initial positive review. Then Google stepped in and paid them to change it to be negative? Just want to make sure I'm getting this right...

If the class action reception lawsuit moves forward, I would subpoena both Apple (We have gone back to our labs and retested everything, and the results are the same the iPhone 4s wireless performance is the best we have ever shipped.) and Consumer Reports to see the data collected and how it was done.
post #51 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

Apple needs to innovate some antenna reception to compete with other phone makers.

I beseech you, please go away. Your relentlessly (and pointlessly) negative comments are burying the issue for those who are attempting to post legitimate comments about the problem of signal/bar drops.

You are a pathetic example of Gresham's Law at work. (Look it up).
post #52 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

I definitely DO question CRs integrity, and have for years. Don't forget, they were the hard core Toyota sycophants for years too. We all know how "Toyota Quality" has turned out in real life as opposed to CRs fantasy review land. They also were very critical of Macs for many years, writing patently false reviews riddled with factual errors. As well, they've been responsible for many false health and safety scares over the years.

Anyone who already knows anything about a product that CR reviews can tell you that they do not know what they are talking about, and never have. Consumers Reports is not a credible source of information about ANYTHING.

Yea right toyota just made cheap junk all these years. Sorry, not good enough. Data, need data. While I do think CR is too critical and narrow on issues and on what's good or bad, that's far different from fraud. In general they hit the mark. Their more recent reviews of Toyota have not put them on top. I suppose their recent no approval of the Lexus suv was fraud also? Which btw forced Lexus to recall and change their software. Pssst, why is that thing with foil on his hat staring at you?
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post #53 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

I definitely DO question CRs integrity, and have for years. Don't forget, they were the hard core Toyota sycophants for years too. We all know how "Toyota Quality" has turned out in real life as opposed to CRs fantasy review land. They also were very critical of Macs for many years, writing patently false reviews riddled with factual errors. As well, they've been responsible for many false health and safety scares over the years.

Anyone who already knows anything about a product that CR reviews can tell you that they do not know what they are talking about, and never have. Consumers Reports is not a credible source of information about ANYTHING.

Man what color is the sky in your world dude? CR is the ONLY source in the world today for dispassionate, fact based analysis of consumer products. They do not succumb to pressure and do not accept advertising. One possible reason Apple could have deleted the threads is that CR almost never let's people reprint their reviews or even reference them. They sue and win. Their tests are performed carefully and their ratings combine test results for surveys provided by subscribers. Are they perfect? Of course, not nothing is. If changing your mind because you did more testing, gathered new information and found a difference is called flip-flopping then so be it. Do some research on them and you'll see. Even better why don't you go get a job there and do an undercover investigation? Until you do that your assertions have no validity.
post #54 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by shapesNforms View Post

So, if I follow the logic on this, and Consumer Reports can be "bought", that means Apple paid them for the initial positive review. Then Google stepped in and paid them to change it to be negative? Just want to make sure I'm getting this right...

If the class action reception lawsuit moves forward, I would subpoena both Apple (We have gone back to our labs and retested everything, and the results are the same the iPhone 4s wireless performance is the best we have ever shipped.) and Consumer Reports to see the data collected and how it was done.

No... Don't you know, It was the guys with the tin foil hats. Man, is it a full moon or what tonight?
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post #55 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

As far as I'm concerned, no one has shown with any degree of certainty that the iPhone 4 exhibits any sort of reception problems that result in dropped calls or slow data.

OK, I'll try to be nice here, and not call you any bad names. But are you serious? I can hold my iPhone 4 (the 2nd one I received from Applethey agreed to swap out the first one) in the palm of my left hand and after ~10 secs. the Speed Test app drops the 3G connection from ~2 MBps download speed to "unable to connect to server." And in several conversations I've had testing this condition my voice calls drop dead. Gone. As in: "No Service." And this happens in almost every location I've been to since I got my original iPhone on June 23. Yes, I've even demonstrated it to the clerks inside my local AT&T store. The only place it hasn't happened is when I stood 20 yards from an AT&T cell tower about ten miles from my house.

Your opinion that "no one" has shown any sort of reception problem flies in the face of absolute, empirical, repeatable facts. And as Aldous Huxley said: "Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored."

It difficult for me to believe that anyone can still be spouting the line that this is all some fantasy from a bunch of Apple haters. I've owned and used Apple products since I bought the original 128K Mac back in February of '84. I use them for my work. I've encouraged my friends and relatives to buy them. But Apple has dropped a turd in the punchbowl here. And reading what you wrote just makes me apoplectic. You owe it to yourself to open your eyes. Those of us who have gone to the trouble to test this vigorously aren't persuaded by your profound ignorance.
post #56 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foo2 View Post

Yes, all cell phones exhibit signal attenuation to some degree depending on how they're held. The iPhone 4 exhibits it to an extreme, when held naturally.

If the signal is strong enough, it won't be completely suppressed by the death grip.
Apple never claimed that fixing the "stunning" bars software issue will fix the signal attenuation problem of the iPhone 4.

Sanity! Thank you
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post #57 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Just posted this to another thread...

This confuses me???


Haven't read all the posts-- just a few of the first and a few of the last.

Forgive me if this has already been posted:


Consumer Reports: "By the Way, the iPhone 4 is Also the Best Smartphone on the Market"

http://digitaldaily.allthingsd.com/2...on-the-market/

.

That's hilarious. Great link.
post #58 of 169
I tried to warn people NOT to upgrade to iOS4 on a iPhone 3G as it wiped my phone and my wife's phone and pretty much rendered them useless. They DELETED my posts. Idiots.

Typical modern day way of dealing with problems. IGNORE them and hope they go away.

Message to Apple and Steve Jobs: WE WILL NEVER FORGET IOS4, AKA: YOUR "VISTA". The mere fact that you are DENYING and IGNORING this disaster is cause for great alarm. You are no longer trustworthy.
post #59 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by n2macs View Post

Consumer Reports did not say "don't buy the iphone". What they did say is "At this point we cannot recommend that consumers buy the iphone". there is a big difference between not recommending and saying don't buy. I have had the iphone since day one and have not had any issues. Even on a bad day, the iphone works better than most phones (imoa).

Good point, but unfortunately, few will actually read it that way. The haters didn't even bother to notice that CR otherwise thought very highly of the iPhone 4 overall. They just clip and repeat this one friggin' soundbite. Sadly, so has the mainstream press.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #60 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Consumer Report is flip-flopping, praising the iPhone one minute, then dismissing it, then doing some sleight-of-hand back-pedaling.

Hmm... that would constitute 2 changes of opinion, but I count only one change of any sort from CR. CR went from praising but not issuing a recommendation of the iPhone 4, to praising and explicitly saying they can not recommend the iPhone 4. Maybe they will eventually recommend the iPhone 4 after further testing or after Apple provides an adequate (in CR's opinion) response.

Quote:
Apple has every right to delete that nonsense from their own boards.

Somebody said they didn't?
post #61 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by MediaPlex View Post

I tried to warn people NOT to upgrade to iOS4 on a iPhone 3G as it wiped my phone and my wife's phone and pretty much rendered them useless. They DELETED my posts. Idiots.

Typical modern day way of dealing with problems. IGNORE them and hope they go away.

Message to Apple and Steve Jobs: WE WILL NEVER FORGET IOS4, AKA: YOUR "VISTA". The mere fact that you are DENYING and IGNORING this disaster is cause for great alarm. You are no longer trustworthy.

Delete your anger. Search around the web. There is a way to return to iOS 3.1.3. Chill out.

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
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post #62 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

I definitely DO question CRs integrity, and have for years. Don't forget, they were the hard core Toyota sycophants for years too. We all know how "Toyota Quality" has turned out in real life as opposed to CRs fantasy review land. They also were very critical of Macs for many years, writing patently false reviews riddled with factual errors. As well, they've been responsible for many false health and safety scares over the years.

Anyone who already knows anything about a product that CR reviews can tell you that they do not know what they are talking about, and never have. Consumers Reports is not a credible source of information about ANYTHING.

If you disagree with the review that's fine. It's your choice. Integrity is a different matter altogether and insinuates that these reviews are somehow not earnest.
post #63 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Just posted this to another thread...

This confuses me???


Haven't read all the posts-- just a few of the first and a few of the last.

Forgive me if this has already been posted:


Consumer Reports: "By the Way, the iPhone 4 is Also the Best Smartphone on the Market"

http://digitaldaily.allthingsd.com/2...on-the-market/

.

I have to agree with Consumer Reports in both their blog and their review of the phone.

When I take my iphone out of my case and hold it in the "death grip" I can get my bars to drop if I hold it in an unnatural position for me. I don't think I would have noticed the bars dropping if there wasn't so much hype surrounding it. I wish Consumer Reports would have published their data instead of just their conclusions. Especially when they taint their analysis with a duct tape solution instead of a case, come on, how over the top. Additionally, their claim that the 3GS and palm pre phones don't lose signal when you cover their antenna is preposterous. I can make my 3G lose bars by holding it just so, but I'll admit it is much more difficult.

The phone itself is better than I'd hoped. It's much faster, the display is amazing, most of the apps I've used have adapted to OS4 so I'm getting the full multitasking experience without draining my battery. I'm extremely pleased with this phone so far. The camera is a huge upgrade over the 3G and I was able to Facetime a good friend I haven't seen in a while. Really liking it.
post #64 of 169
I love that phone. However, people who go the "there is no proof that calls are actually dropped" route should really reconsider their alcohol drinking habit. In other words, my iPhone 4, as well as all of my friends, are among those "very few phones" with issues. Yes, signal drops. No, my Nokia doesn't loose signal that way. Same place.
So, those people who say "I have the iPhone and I have no issues are either lying, deluding themselves something fierce (maybe they just dream of owning an iPhone 4, and not actually have one?), or for some reason got a very different phone than those I've seen until now.
It's not a crippling issue, people can get a plastic/aluminium/jobs-skin/leather case (like the one at www.jean-rousseau.com ...)
However, the way Apple deals with the issue reminds us of:
-broken (exploding?) iPhones
-watercooling iMacs
Anyone remembers that? I do.

So, I keep my iPhone, and I keep buying Macs. But people denying the issue are just plain wrong.

Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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Social Capitalist, dreamer and wise enough to know I'm never going to grow up anyway... so not trying anymore.

 

http://m.ign.com/articles/2014/07/16/7-high-school-girls-are-kickstarting-their-awa...

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post #65 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytdave View Post

This is turning into a PR nightmare. If Apple wouldn't have jumped into the stupidity of denial mode to begin with, this would not be a big deal. If they would have simply said "we'll look into the reports" instead of making all the stupid remarks they've made, and offer free bumpers to any iPhone 4 owner who wants one, there would be no PR problem. Way to screw up the biggest product launch in their history.

The reality is, there is a problem, but it's also easily fixed. Apple just needs to pull their heads out of the sand and get to it already. The external side of the antennas need a non-conductive coating applied. That's it! Dang it, get it done already! Sheesh.

Well, let's face it... it's a screw-up of potentially biblical proportions in terms of Apple product releases, but it hasn't really slowed sales AFAIK. Also, a little perspective, please. It's not like they leaked oil into the gulf, released radioactive steam into the air, or harmed someone's puppy.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #66 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bagman View Post

No, there is no restocking fee. I paid nothing to return mine, and they refunded my protective cover charge and the Applecare charge (which they weren't obligated to do. ATT went out of their way to help me reverse the iP4 purchase. I'm back to my original 3Gs and original contract term, which ends in Sept. If they fix the hardware issue, I'll be back for the new version. My 3Gs is lame by comparison in every way but decreased signal strength when touching the dreaded "3G Spot" (sorry bout that ladies).

Thanks for posting your return experience. I'm heading in tomorrow to take mine back. I have exchanged twice now and each is no better at making calls than the first. My old contract expires in November, so I'll take another look at the iP4 V2 then.
post #67 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Apple has every right to delete threads pointing to the obviously biased consumer reports article.

I wouldn't say they don't have the right to delete threads, to me it's just the fact they were caught doing it that's the story.

Although where do you draw the line. If Google stopped any news articles that were negative about them from appearing in Google News would that be wrong? After all it's there news tool.
post #68 of 169
This is how I imagine the news from Consumer Reports made it's way around today...

Microsoft HQ
Steve Balmer talking to Bill Gates...

Hey Bill, Steve herehey, remember when we talked the other day and you told me I need to start putting my foot down around here and get everyone in line?

Yeah?

Well Bill, I did it, I did it!

What did you do Steve?

I told the Windows phone 7 guys I dont give a shit how buggy the first version might be, just make damn sure the antenna works, we will fix the buggy stuff later!

Good job Steve!

AT&T Support center break room

Hey, I had this call earlierthis woman said she saw some article how Consumer Reports isnt recommending buying the iPhonesomething about the antenna I guess

Really, you mean its not our fault this time?

Google HQ

Hey, did you see where Consumer Reports gave the new iPhone a good review then changed their minds and now say, dont buy it?

Yeahmy first thought was, hopefully this will slow down sales enough of that thing so our guys dont have to rush to finish their UI design and Photoshop classes!

Apple HQ
Phone call between Steve Jobs and Phil Schiller

Hi Steve, Phil heredid you see the article on Consumer Reports today?

Yes I did

Im sorry SteveIll call themclickdisconnected...

Hey Steve, sorry about that, got disconnectedAnyways Ill call them and threaten to sue and weclickdisconnected...

Im so sorry, anyways like I was saying

Phil?

Yes Steve?

You did get my company wide email earlier todaythe one liner that said simply; go back to using the 3GS, right?

Was that from you? I wasnt sure
post #69 of 169
Does Apple really believe that ditching forums posts will stop this story from circulating, or that the censorship won't become another story in itself?

Creepier by the day....
post #70 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmazingApple View Post

Thanks for posting your return experience. I'm heading in tomorrow to take mine back. I have exchanged twice now and each is no better at making calls than the first. My old contract expires in November, so I'll take another look at the iP4 V2 then.

Marco (Marco.org) had an interesting article related to this in that you may never see a redesigned iPhone 4. He says:

Quote:
To fix the problems, Apple will need to replace, redesign, or relocate the proximity sensor and prevent electrical conductivity between the antenna sections (possibly with an insulating coating on the steel). They can do this with a mid-cycle hardware revision, but they’d face an even more massive PR disaster (and a potential class-action suit) if they didn’t recall all iPhone 4s sold so far for replacement with the fixed models. It would need to be an unconditional (but probably optional) recall.

But I seriously doubt that the same Apple that wrote that giant-middle-finger response to the antenna problem would swallow their own pride enough to admit that they were wrong and conduct a recall on their flagship product.

And that’s a shame, because the temporary negative press from doing a recall is minimal compared to the huge asterisk that everyone will always place next to anything good about the iPhone 4.
post #71 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bagman;

Are you kidding? I demonstrated it to both the Apple store guys and the ATT store guys before returning it for a refund. Denial anyone?

It is puzzling however that some people can't reproduce the problem. That seems to indicate a problem with only some of the production run, or maybe that other factors are involved. Satisfied customers don't generally go on 'happy rants', so characterising the problems as a universal issue with the iPhone by reading complaints on blogs doesn't make a lot of sense.

Are we seeing millions of returns by dissatisfied customers? Until we know how widespread the problem is, I have to assume it's blown out of proportion. That's not exactly unusual when it comes to anything apple. What other company attracts as many trolls?

I'm sorry to hear you have problems with your phone. I'm hoping we have more facts before I get to buy one in Canada.
post #72 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

Marco (Marco.org) had an interesting article related to this in that you may never see a redesigned iPhone 4. He says:

Quote:
Originally Posted by str1f3 View Post

To fix the problems, Apple will need to replace, redesign, or relocate the proximity sensor and prevent electrical conductivity between the antenna sections (possibly with an insulating coating on the steel). They can do this with a mid-cycle hardware revision, but they’d face an even more massive PR disaster (and a potential class-action suit) if they didn’t recall all iPhone 4s sold so far for replacement with the fixed models. It would need to be an unconditional (but probably optional) recall.

But I seriously doubt that the same Apple that wrote that giant-middle-finger response to the antenna problem would swallow their own pride enough to admit that they were wrong and conduct a recall on their flagship product.

And that’s a shame, because the temporary negative press from doing a recall is minimal compared to the huge asterisk that everyone will always place next to anything good about the iPhone 4.


Yes, that would be true. I hadn't looked at it that way. You can bet the iP5 will include an antenna redesign. Thanks for posting this article!
post #73 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Hopefully some actual 'Apple support reps' will chime in soon.

Since "Apple Discussions is a user-to-user support forum", they almost never do.
And with all the bad PR going on with this, even less likely they will say anything in a publicly accessible (but still privately owned) forum.
Perhaps if/when they have an actual fix there may be a few questions but more likely to simply get some data from affected users.
post #74 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightknight;

snip
However, the way Apple deals with the issue reminds us of:
-broken (exploding?) iPhones
-watercooling iMacs
Anyone remembers that? I do.

So, I keep my iPhone, and I keep buying Macs. But people denying the issue are just plain wrong.

What's a water-cooling iMac??

I think the 'exploding iPhones', were actually a couple of iPods one of them a case in the UK that was thrown out of court because it was fraudulent. Are those the ones you remember?
post #75 of 169
Duplicate...
post #76 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tofino View Post

It is puzzling however that some people can't reproduce the problem. That seems to indicate a problem with only some of the production run, or maybe that other factors are involved. Satisfied customers don't generally go on 'happy rants', so characterising the problems as a universal issue with the iPhone by reading complaints on blogs doesn't make a lot of sense.

Are we seeing millions of returns by dissatisfied customers? Until we know how widespread the problem is, I have to assume it's blown out of proportion. That's not exactly unusual when it comes to anything apple. What other company attracts as many trolls?

I'm sorry to hear you have problems with your phone. I'm hoping we have more facts before I get to buy one in Canada.

It's a combination of two things...the antenna design and the quality of cell service getting to that antenna. The antenna design is what it is...it does reduce reception, being as exposed as it is. If the cell signal getting to it is good, then the reduction isn't as pronounced or evident. If your in a marginal area for reception, that antenna design makes the situation that much worse. So people with good cell service don't see it as much as others.

What doesn't help the issue are many people are coming from 3G/3GS phones to the iPhone 4 and seeing many more dropped calls and other issues, compared to their earlier iPhone's. Maybe if we were coming from other phones, the people who are having the issue wouldn't complain as much or notice as much. What also doesn't help the situation is the people having the issues are labeled as "trolls" and such.

As a fan of Apple products, the tech in me loves the new phone. As a consumer, I have the right to complain, if it's not meeting my expectations, especially when I compare it to my older 3GS which it replaced. That doesn't make me a "troll" just as much as the person who says they have no issues, would be a "fanboy"...
post #77 of 169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Appleinsider

But on Monday, the organization did a 180-degree turn, and advised customers not to buy the handset.

That's not what they wrote. They just wrote they could no longer recommend it. That's pretty sloppy journalism AI.
Quote:
Originally Posted by n2macs;

Consumer Reports did not say "don't buy the iphone". What they did say is "At this point we cannot recommend that consumers buy the iphone". there is a big difference between not recommending and saying don't buy. I have had the iphone since day one and have not had any issues. Even on a bad day, the iphone works better than most phones (imoa).

Six x 3.5GHz '14 MP, 64GB, 1TB PCIe, 16TB HDs
2.6GHz 6GB 17"HD LED MBP, Sony 52XBR6 HDTV
EyeTV 500, Hybrid 2G, EyeTV 3 HDTV Recorder
64 ATT iPhone 5S, 128 ATT iPad Air, 128 ATT iPad miniRetina, 16...

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Six x 3.5GHz '14 MP, 64GB, 1TB PCIe, 16TB HDs
2.6GHz 6GB 17"HD LED MBP, Sony 52XBR6 HDTV
EyeTV 500, Hybrid 2G, EyeTV 3 HDTV Recorder
64 ATT iPhone 5S, 128 ATT iPad Air, 128 ATT iPad miniRetina, 16...

Reply
post #78 of 169
Okay, my iPhone 4 arrived today. Along with lots of other people. The guy at FedEx was saying to the long line of people, all of which were waiting to pickup their iPhones, "I hope you enjoy your new iPhone" in an ironic tone -- as he had been passing them out all day. Anyway, I live in San Francisco -- YES, SAN FRANCISCO -- home of the dreaded 3G signal or not from hell. Anyway, you know the minute I got home to my apartment that has the worst signal in the world on my iPhone 3GS where I must go outside to get a call -- that I would test this iPhone 4 by making calls, gripping it to death with both hands, touching one and then the other and then both little bars -- AND DRUM ROLL PLEASE -- NOTHING! I can't get this iPhone to drop a call. I can't get this iPhone to drop signal no matter how hard I grip it. Bars stay consistent no matter how I hold the phone. I was even able to place a call inside my apartment with no issue. In summary, I don't get what is going on here with this antenna thing. I invited a friend over and we compared iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 and gripped them in our left hands and we saw NO DIFFERENCE. I bought a bumper as I feared it was a required "design feature" but I don't even intend to use it now. So, is it possible some iPhones made in the early runs were simply defective and that this isn't a "fatal design flaw" that got past numerous check points at Apple?
post #79 of 169
This is turning into one big, fat, ugly PR disaster. It's stunning insofar that Apple has been communicating very well over the past several years, even decades. Now this is just out of control, no matter how big the issue really is. You'll only see the real influence all this has once the international launches start. See if they can repeat the frenzy that was iPhone 3G. I doubt it.
Matyoroy!
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Matyoroy!
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post #80 of 169
I had a 3G, I now have an iPhone 4. It drops calls less than the 3G in my own personal dead zone ( my house). Aside from the iPhone 4 being on another level of speed and functionality compared to the 3G - notably GPS reception is light years better. I can't imagine actually returning a iPhone 4....

CR are a bunch of panicked neurotic old ladies - they prefer dull reliable cars with poor engineering ( e.g. Toyota who never heard of disconnecting the accelerator when the brake pedal is touched like most european manufactures) over brilliantly engineered cars with an occasional flaw. The same applies to cell phones apparently.
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