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iPhone 4 recall could cost Apple $1.5 billion - Page 2

post #41 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by BartBuzz View Post

I agree. It would be interesting to see that data. BTW...in the spirit of full disclosure I don't have an iPhone. As a diehard Verizon customer I am patiently waiting. But I can say that from what I've seen and from my friends who have iPhones there is nothing about this antenna flap to keep me from buying the iP4. Especially since we know a bumper case mitigates the reception anomaly.

I'm waiting on Verizon before I upgrade to the iPhone 4. I held one in my hand for about 5 minutes and was amazed at the resolution of the display and the sheer beauty of the phone. From what I've read the iPhone 4 has better reception than the 3gs model that I own and better reception than most other phones. I own a few shares of apple stock, and I hope Steve Jobs stays the course he has set. I believe it will be a freezing day in Hades before he recalls the iPhone 4.
post #42 of 108
Right now, nobody is sure how wide spread the reception issue might be but its there for some and not for others. One thing I thought of with this is a potential parallel between the iPhone 4 and the Xbox 360

Both products launched with much anticipation, with both selling out on their initial production runs and continuing to sell very well after. Both were praised for what they offered in terms of features and considered to be the best in their class at the time. Both, almost out of the gate suffered from a nagging issue that affecting some but not the majorityThe Xbox 360 with its red ring of death and the iPhone 4 with its death grip reception issue

Right now, with Apple and the iPhone 4, we have no idea where this will go and what its resolution might be but something telling can be learned from Microsofts experience in dealing with the red ring of death problemIm going to quote a snippet from this article here: http://red-ring-of-death.blogspot.com/

Ive added some things in bold

"In the end I think it was fear of failure, ambition to beat Sony (Apple wanting to beat Android and maintain its lead), and the arrogance that they could figure anything out, that led to the decision to keep shipping. That management team had made some pretty bad decisions in the past (Apple hasnt made many bad decisions but small ones27 iMac displays, Time Capsules..) and had never had to pay a proportional consequence. I'm sure they thought that somehow they would figure it out and everything would end up ok. Plus, they tend to make big decisions like that in terms of dollars. They would rationalize that if the first few million boxes had a high failure rate, a few 10's of millions of dollars would cover it."

Let's hope Apple doesn't go down the same road...
post #43 of 108
I suspect Apple knew there was an issue with reception. So instead of spending Apple's money to fix it, someone came up with the brilliant idea of charging customers money to fix it - thus the bumper was born. Less than a dollar to manufacture, sell for $29. Then they can tell anyone with problems to buy a bumper to fix it. Genius!
post #44 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienvenom View Post

How are only 25% of the users affected? If it's a design flaw (and I'm not suggesting it is) wouldn't it be more like 100%?

75% of iPhone users simply use one of the many cases available for the iPhone, so they don't have any problems. One the software update is released, this whole thing is over.
post #45 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbonner View Post

Bumpers don't fix the proximity sensor issue. Really tired of my cheek hanging. Not a Apple hater, just want my phone to work.

You can use the headphones and leave the phone in your pocket.
post #46 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by stonefree View Post

I suspect Apple knew there was an issue with reception. So instead of spending Apple's money to fix it, someone came up with the brilliant idea of charging customers money to fix it - thus the bumper was born. Less than a dollar to manufacture, sell for $29. Then they can tell anyone with problems to buy a bumper to fix it. Genius!

Well that was a massive mistake because if they almost certainly will have to give a certificate for a iP4 cover. They wont be able to give their bumper away for free. which means the actual cost is now more like $29xNumber of iP4's sold which is already upward of $60m

Quote:
Originally Posted by SendMe View Post

75% of iPhone users simply use one of the many cases available for the iPhone, so they don't have any problems. One the software update is released, this whole thing is over.

Software is unlikely to fix the problem for 2 reasons

1 - This is most likely a physics problem
2 - Apple are focusing on changing the display bars


The only way software can fix the problem is if the dropped calls etc are because the firmware switches from 3g to edge to gprs too slowly to maintain the call. In this case software COULD make a significant difference.
post #47 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

I am little annoyed by Apple's approach



Aren't you being kind of harsh?
post #48 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruel24 View Post

I'm just curious about what cost there is to Apple if they don't fix it? I mean, the tarnished public image can do major financial damage. The best course is to investigate, and if it's real, fess up and fix it, IMO. If you deny it, and it's real, you could end up doing more harm. If it's truly not real, then investigate and make a public statement about proof that it's not real, and not because Steve says it ain't so.

People have selective memory and with APPLE this issue will pass before you know it. Remember people were preordering the IPHONE4 before anyone really saw it in real life.
When Apple releases its fix lets see the reaction.
post #49 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glgbnaf View Post

Good apple deserves every bit of a loss finally!!!! I'm one of the 1.7 million who got scammed on a flawed device!!!! Heck with Steve jobs ya he is termally I'll maybe this will enhance more to pay him back haaaaaaaa what comes around goes round!!!!!!!!!

Good grief. Where are the idiot police when you really need them?
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Pity the agnostic dyslectic. They spend all their time contemplating the existence of dog.
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post #50 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by alienvenom View Post

How are only 25% of the users affected? If it's a design flaw (and I'm not suggesting it is) wouldn't it be more like 100%?

It seems potentially 100% of owners could be affected, but consider what fraction of owners at any given point in time are experiencing a failure due to the antenna design--and not just any failure but a failure that actually matters?

Roughly speaking, it would be the fraction of users who do not currently have their iP4 enclosed in a case, who are holding it in a manner that bridges the antenna gap, who are presently in a location of low-moderate signal strength, who perhaps don't have an alternate (e.g., EDGE) frequency to fall back on for cellular communications, who are actively trying to make a call or use cellular (not wi-fi) data or for whom someone is trying to call them, and such that the communication is actually important.

On average, how often does an iPhone owner find themselves in such a situation, what fraction of the time do they not know it (and therefore don't know to adjust their grip), and what fraction of that time does it matter?

In spite of how unlikely/infrequently it may seem to matter on average--a figure Apple may be looking at to assess their liability--I prefer not to worry about signal drop at all and to hold my iPhone 4 any way that's most comfortable: I enclosed my iPhone 4 in a bumper, a bumper that I had little desire or intention of ever buying, especially when it interferes with the $29 Apple dock I had already bought for the iPhone 4 and is incompatible with a retractable charger cable I often use. My work desk is a prime location (with 4-5 bars) for dropping signal entirely when the phone is held comfortably but "wrong". That was more than enough reason for me to jump on the bumper I didn't want.
post #51 of 108
It's early yet, just a couple of days, but I haven't noticed any reception issues with mine, knock on wood. Heck ... even AT&T customer service has been OK.
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http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

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Never quote idiots, they just clog up...
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post #52 of 108
Launch day- Australia, I'm getting one, I don't give a stuff about what ten million whining American bloggers have to say.

I have been monitoring my day to day iPhone 3G usage and I do not touch that area of the phone.
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post #53 of 108
Quote:
Examining the longer-term consequences for Apple, Sacconaghi turned to "the emerging pattern of hubris that the company has displayed, which has increasingly pitted competitors (and regulators) against the company, and risks alienating customers over time."

As some examples, the analyst noted Apple's "limited disclosure practices, its attack on Adobe's Flash, its investigation into its lost iPhone prototype (which culminated in a reporter's home being searched while he was away and computers being removed), its restrictions on app development, and its ostensibly dismissive characterizations of the iPhone's antenna issues (i.e., phone needs to be held a different way; a software issue that affects the number of bars displayed)."

Sacconaghi further speculates that "these issues may, over time, begin to impact consumers' perceptions of Apple, undermining its enormous prevailing commercial success."


Only a fool would ignore the seriousness of the iPhone 4 antenna and reception issues. Deleting message threads mentionning the Consumer Report article is childish and definitely not the leadership that iPhone buyers are expecting.


post #54 of 108
Dear iPhone4 Customers,

Over the last couple of weeks, there has been enormous amount of hysteria about Antenna reception issues related to the iPhone 4. The number of customers actually impacted by this problem is quite minimal, because it only affects people in weak signal areas, and only if the phone is held in certain ways. However, at Apple, we have always believed in delighting customers, every single step of the way - right from the experience while you shop, the experience when you unbox the product, the experience using the product throughout its life. If there is the slightest problem in that experience, real or perceived, it will not be an Apple experience any more.

We wish to offer our customers the following options -

- Extended risk free return period upto 365 days if you have purchased the iPhone4 before 31 Jul 2010. Instead of the usual 30 days, please feel free to try out the product over 365 days. At any point, if you are not satisfied, you can return the product to the nearest Apple Store for a full refund of purchase price. Or just register at the Apple Website and we will arrange to pick up your phone from you, and refund your money. We will also work with AT&T to waive your 2 year contract, if you choose to return your phone. You will however have to bear the AT&T fees for using the phone for the period you choose to keep the phone.

- In addition, if you have purchased an iPhone4 before 31 Jul 2010, you can get free bumpers - just download the "iPhone4" app from the AppStore, select two colors of bumpers, and we will ship those 2 bumpers to you FREE. You can get more colors for $4.99 each. In addition to this, in the same app, you can enter your MobileMe subscriber details, and select Extend Subscription to get 1 year of MobileMe subscription for Free - if you are not currently a MobileMe user, you can sign up for a new MobileMe account free for the first year. If you still decide to return the iPhone 4, you can still continue to use the MobileMe service for free.

- We know iPhone 4 works well for significant majority of customers, and with the bumpers, should work well for pretty much everyone. However, we still realize that the last couple of weeks have been hard for the Apple faithful - especially early adopters. For all our early adopters, here is a special offer - if you have bought an iPhone 4 before 31 Jul 2010, you can exchange your iPhone4 for the then latest release of the iPhone for FREE, 24 months after you purchased the iPhone4. Effectively, when it is time for you to upgrade your current phone, the upgrade is free.

(the above offers are applicable to customers who have purchased an iPhone4 before 31 Jul 2010. All iPhones bought after 31 Jul 2010 will not have the antenna reception issue).

Thanks,
Apple Customer Care

-- This is a hypothetical mail - something I think Apple can and should send out, to mitigate the Antenna issue. Firstly, this way of response will work out a lot cheaper for Apple. Giving a 365 day risk free return costs very little effectively - most people will choose to keep the phone, with the free bumpers. The bumpers themselves should cost Apple just 10-20 cents each in volume. There is already lot of talk of MobileMe becoming free, so giving away MobileMe also will not cost Apple much. In all likelihood, Apple can extend iAd program to MobileMe as well and recover their costs easily. Also, because of the free upgrade to iPhone6, the resale value of the original iPhone4 will likely be a lot higher than the return value of the phone - so in all likelihood, even a dissatisfied customer would rather sell the phone on eBay than return it to Apple!

The only real cost to Apple would be the free upgrade to iPhone 5 on launch - but even this is not really a cost to Apple - because this will be an exchange offer - an Old iPhone4 can be refurbished and sold contract-free, for $299 - so if it costs Apple $100 to refurbish these phones, they can easily sell the old phones back after fixing the antenna issue, and changing some external components - like glass, stainless steel, etc. They could possibly even change the battery to give better battery life. Even if Apple decides not to refurbish these phones, and just recycles the materials, the fact that 10 million phones are not flooding the second hand phone market will give a great boost to iPhone sales in 2012.

The beauty of this solution is that it costs very little in reality, allows significantly higher sales of iPhone4 - I would expect several million people signing up for iPhone4 before 31 July, if they can get a free upgrade to iPhone6 in 2 years. This is one way for Apple to convert a crisis into an opportunity, and regain the trust of customers. Rather than spend $1.5B today, Apple can get more customers today!
post #55 of 108
I think the iphone 4 deathgrip issue is probably linked to fat left-handed people with sweaty hands.

Japanese people don't see this problem because they have long learned how to text with their right thumb only...and are skinny.

post #56 of 108
I wish everyone would read the article in Anandtech on this issue. Anandtech is one of the most respected sites for information technology. Brian Klug & Anand Lal Shimpi did pretty thorough testing. The article can be found at: http://www.anandtech.com/show/3794/t...one-4-review/2

Excerpt:
"The Antenna is Improved
From my day of testing, I've determined that the iPhone 4 performs much better than the 3GS in situations where signal is very low, at -113 dBm (1 bar). Previously, dropping this low all but guaranteed that calls would drop, fail to be placed, and data would no longer be transacted at all. I can honestly say that I've never held onto so many calls and data simultaneously on 1 bar at -113 dBm as I have with the iPhone 4, so it's readily apparent that the new baseband hardware is much more sensitive compared to what was in the 3GS. The difference is that reception is massively better on the iPhone 4 in actual use.

With my bumper case on, I made it further into dead zones than ever before, and into marginal areas that would always drop calls without any problems at all. It's amazing really to experience the difference in sensitivity the iPhone 4 brings compared to the 3GS, and issues from holding the phone aside, reception is absolutely definitely improved. I felt like I was going places no iPhone had ever gone before. There's no doubt in my mind this iPhone gets the best cellular reception yet, even though measured signal is lower than the 3GS."
post #57 of 108
Rather than speculate on the cost, I'd like to see someone come up with a fix.

The question is not whether it will cost a billion to recall the phone. It's whether the issue can be fixed with a simple adaptation of the existing design.

Because redesigning the interior of the phone and remanufacturing supplies will take at least 18 months, and having this drag out that long will do more damage to Apple than any recall.

This is a Toyota-kind of issue for Apple. If their reputation for design leadership and quality takes a public hit, Android and RIM are suddenly back in the game.
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post #58 of 108
Stock manipulation anyone?
post #59 of 108
Quote:
As some examples, the analyst noted Apple's "limited disclosure practices...

How they run their own business is, frankly, their own business.

Quote:
its attack on Adobe's Flash

Flash sucks (esp. on Apple products) and I'll be glad when it's dead. It can't even play a 480p video on a dual-core MacBook without causing the fan to turn on. I'll be damned if I'm putting that crap on my phone, especially if I have no way of blocking Flash ads.

Quote:
its investigation into its lost iPhone prototype (which culminated in a reporter's home being searched while he was away and computers being removed)

You mean "the police's investigation into multiple felonies" in a case in which Apple was the victim.

Quote:
its restrictions on app development

Again, their own business.

Quote:
and its ostensibly dismissive characterizations of the iPhone's antenna issues (i.e., phone needs to be held a different way; a software issue that affects the number of bars displayed)."

Finally, a valid point. Their handling of the obviously widespread iPhone 4 issues has been absolutely abysmal.
post #60 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

Launch day- Australia, I'm getting one, I don't give a stuff about what ten million whining American bloggers have to say.

I have been monitoring my day to day iPhone 3G usage and I do not touch that area of the phone.

Most American consumers don't appear to "give a stuff" about what the bloggers have to say either, as the demand here for iPhone4 remains well ahead of supply.

I think the reality is that the bloggers are driven more by Apple's competitors in the mobile phone space than by consumers. Testament to how well Apple is doing with iPhone and how scared the competition is. This blogger blitzkrieg over alleged iPhone antenna issues is for the most part an all out attack on Apple by its competition.
post #61 of 108
If you go to cnn.com right now the headline is: iPhone 4 can be fixed with duct tape. This is well beyond Apple's competitors and a few discontented bloggers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by iBill View Post

Most American consumers don't appear to "give a stuff" about what the bloggers have to say either, as the demand here for iPhone4 remains well ahead of supply.

I think the reality is that the bloggers are driven more by Apple's competitors in the mobile phone space than by consumers. Testament to how well Apple is doing with iPhone and how scared the competition is. This blogger blitzkrieg over alleged iPhone antenna issues is for the most part an all out attack on Apple by its competition.
post #62 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveStuff View Post

A free bumper with your iPhone4 and be done with it!!!
Of coarse, Apple haters will never let it go, but who gives a f__k what they think anyway!
On the other hand, if a software fix is actually possible, that would be even better.
A full recall is not going to happen because the iPhone4 works great with a damn bumper on.

Agreed. Then fix it in rev 2. I said this was big. Then came CR, then CNET, then lawsuits for all phones. This is not going away. A free bumper that cost .29 cents to make and fix for the next batch. Problem solved. They cannot charge for them. They simply can't even though 75% use a case. It would be sour apples.
post #63 of 108
"A recall of the iPhone 4 could cost Apple as much as $1.5 billion"... except it wont because there will be no recall.
post #64 of 108
A recall is total BS. The iPhone's antenna issue is not safety related, like an exploding battery or failing brakes. Therefore a recall is not necessary. Customers can try and decide on their own if they want to keep the phone or return it within the regular 30 days return period. If Apple gets too many returns they will have to issue free bumpers. If they still get too many returns they will have to replace the iPhone 4 before Christmas. Mr Sacco should try to calculate what that would cost instead of hyperventilating about a recall.
post #65 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic8Ball View Post


Software is unlikely to fix the problem for 2 reasons

1 - This is most likely a physics problem
2 - Apple are focusing on changing the display bars


The only way software can fix the problem is if the dropped calls etc are because the firmware switches from 3g to edge to gprs too slowly to maintain the call. In this case software COULD make a significant difference.

Assumptions.

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post #66 of 108
The Wii Motes would break the tv if you let them fly accidentally. Nintendo gave all customers free rubber covers for every Wii mote they owned. I got 4 of them for no charge. Apple can afford to make a lower cost version of their case for free distribution for those that need it. It does not have to be the fancy bumpers that are more expensive.
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post #67 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

At some point that fact (if it is so) will make a good sound bite for Apple. But it doesn't matter at this point point because there is a feeding frenzy going on. Right now a backlash against Apple seems to be happening. Apple is just becoming too damn successful for many people's liking. In my opinion Apple should quickly revise the build to eliminate or minimize whatever fault there is but keep quiet about it. Without making a public statement they should hand out a free invisible 'stick on' fix tapes for affected customers (but perhaps not made by Apple as that could be construed as admitting fault). They should also up their advertising effort as they seem to be doing. In a while this issue will be history and Apple can use the sound bite re the number of returned phones when news hungry journalists raise the question while at the same time pointing out how sales went up during this period. For SJ to open up and admit to a faulty product is ridiculous and would be a bad move. Its not like its a Toyota that inexplicably looses its breaks while careening down the highway. Arial issue? Not ideal but minor nonetheless.

A feeing frenzy?

There is as much of a feeding frenzy about this as there was when the White 3GS apparently turned pink and overheated. A couple of reports on the news and now it's all just bullshit reports in tech blogs that the general public (aka 99.9% of the iPhone 4 purchasers) don't read.

When the initial reports of signal loss were on the news in the uk do you know what the response was from purchasers? They bought flipping cases.

My friend is a manager in a large o2 store and he states that as with the 3GS most people buy cases for their iPhones. The iPhone 4 is no different. He has overheard conversations of queuing customers as they discuss the potential signal issues and that it doesn't matter as they are buying a case anyway.

A little side note: has any of these tests made it clear that their is only signal degradation then in 3G mode?

Most iPhone owners I know switch 3G off unless they need the web whilst out and about.

I tried this with my case off and regardless of how hard I grip the phone the bars don't move.
post #68 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic8Ball View Post

Software is unlikely to fix the problem for 2 reasons

1 - This is most likely a physics problem
2 - Apple are focusing on changing the display bars

The only way software can fix the problem is if the dropped calls etc are because the firmware switches from 3g to edge to gprs too slowly to maintain the call. In this case software COULD make a significant difference.

The software update will help Apple a lot. After the update, every single iPhone owner or potential owner walking into a store will be able to verify that, yes, you do lose one bar when you touch the black stripe and, no, this is not such a big deal and won't stop you from make calls, (not to mention all the other great features which are why you're buying a smartphone in the first place and not just a regular phone). The FUD will retreat and sanity will come back into this discussion.

Secondary measures for Apple would be to
1. Offer free bumpers.
2. Release a more sophisticated white paper that shows that phone reception is about more than just decibels and, even with the finger on the black stripe, the iPhone 4 has better reception than older iPhones.
post #69 of 108
Apple is the only company in the world whose products generate such passion.

Every customer wants one and every competitor wants to copy it with such incredible passion.
Every financial analyst wants a say about the company.


As the world goes into a frenzy over a non-issue software glitch, Apple is as steady as ever as they continue to innovate an execute their plans.

Which ever competitor coerced ConsumerReports to revert their statement will end up with nothing for their money. Perhaps blogs sites will make a few bucks in advertising and the media will have something to talk about for a few days but it will not phase Apple one bit.

Trolls can rant until they turn blue, but there will be no recall or design change on the iPhone 4 because there is no need for that. The signal indicator software on the phone will be updated in the next iOS update. That's all folks.

Time will tell.
post #70 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by jellybelly View Post

I wish everyone would read the article in Anandtech on this issue. Anandtech is one of the most respected sites for information technology. Brian Klug & Anand Lal Shimpi did pretty thorough testing. The article can be found at: http://www.anandtech.com/show/3794/t...one-4-review/2

Excerpt:
"The Antenna is Improved
From my day of testing, I've determined that the iPhone 4 performs much better than the 3GS in situations where signal is very low, at -113 dBm (1 bar). Previously, dropping this low all but guaranteed that calls would drop, fail to be placed, and data would no longer be transacted at all. I can honestly say that I've never held onto so many calls and data simultaneously on 1 bar at -113 dBm as I have with the iPhone 4, so it's readily apparent that the new baseband hardware is much more sensitive compared to what was in the 3GS. The difference is that reception is massively better on the iPhone 4 in actual use.

With my bumper case on, I made it further into dead zones than ever before, and into marginal areas that would always drop calls without any problems at all. It's amazing really to experience the difference in sensitivity the iPhone 4 brings compared to the 3GS, and issues from holding the phone aside, reception is absolutely definitely improved. I felt like I was going places no iPhone had ever gone before. There's no doubt in my mind this iPhone gets the best cellular reception yet, even though measured signal is lower than the 3GS."

Engadget's latest report:

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/13/y...is-not-broken/

Quote:
Anand Shimpi, Anandtech (Raleigh, North Carolina): "I can make the signal drop, but that's not because I'm some sort of superhero - anyone can make the signal drop on their iPhone 4, iPhone 3GS, Nexus One, etc... The iPhone 4 simply drops "more of its signal" than other phones, depending on how you hold it, because of the location and design of the antenna.

So to summarize, yes I can make the signal drop and it has led to dropped calls or trouble continuing the call. It's particularly bad in my office if I hold the phone "incorrectly" while texting or using the phone in portrait mode for something else. Luckily I'm on WiFi when I'm using it like that so it's normally not as big of an issue.

Ultimately it is a real problem with the iPhone 4 and will impact those who have borderline AT&T network coverage more than those who have great coverage. When Apple pushes this new fix forward it's really going to show people whether they have good signal or bad signal where they live (hopefully)." (Make sure you check out Anandtech's full report on the signal issue, as well.)
post #71 of 108
I own an iPhone 4 and yes in some cases its an issue for me.

I think a recall will / should not happen.

A recall is indicated if a replicable, not-recoverable, fatal error with adverse health defects or unfeasible damage occurs.

I know that some people like to construct this but this is not the case because there is a comparable generous return policy and the bumper is a way to circumvent the problem.

I dont know much about US law. In my country you have two to three attempts in a reasonable time frame to fix an issue before You can be forced to a refund.

If an error is hard to understand / investigate in my experience a politic of targeted investigation and replacement is the way to go.

For both, Apple and its customers, the 1.5 billion are better invested in improved warranty processes, quality assurance, manufacturing processes, research and customer support.

Perhaps I will buy a bumper although it hurts the esthetics, which I dislike.

I will not ask for a refund because theres currently no other device that fits my needs as well as this phone. It works brilliant at 99% of my use cases. I'm just not 100% happy.
post #72 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

Nail. Meet head.

I say that as a shareholder (not just as a loyal consumer). I was hoping that Jobs's absence would be a great opportunity for Apple to discover a new way of being what it is without the attitude. Unfortunately, Jobs has come back more omnipotent, more irascible, more paranoid, and less appealing than ever.

No one else in the company seems to have the guts to say a damn thing. Not Cook, not Oppenheimer, not the Board.

And I would say, if not for Steve Jobs your shares wouldn't be worth a penny. Apple would have simply moved into nonexistence in mid 90ties. Why don't you people think a second, before posting such nonsense?
post #73 of 108
Quote:
Apple Retail tells employees something big is on the way

->>>>>
Quote:
iPhone 4 recall could cost Apple $1.5 billion

post #74 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

I agree with above comments and has a shareholder as well, I am little annoyed by Apple's approach to this issue and if this hurts the stock because Steve does not know that "acting like Microsoft in late 80s early 90s" does not work, then he must know, pissing off shareholders is not good situation to be in,if this really affects the stock and overall dividends!

All "real" shareholders know that Apple has not paid dividends since 1995. Try trolling using facts.
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post #75 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

A recall of the iPhone 4 could cost Apple as much as $1.5 billion, according to one investment research firm.

Toni Sacconaghi, an analyst for Bernstein Research, said in a note to clients on Tuesday that while a full product recall is "highly unlikely," it could theoretically cost the company up to $250 per phone. Sacconaghi estimates 6 million units sold or in transit, resulting in a recall price tag as high as $1.5 billion.

Another option is for Apple to offer an in-store hardware fix, which could cost $75 per phone. Giving away a free bumper case, which currently retail for $29, would be a much cheaper alternative for the Cupertino, Calif., company. Sacconaghi estimates this approach would cost just $1 per unit.

Examining the longer-term consequences for Apple, Sacconaghi turned to "the emerging pattern of hubris that the company has displayed, which has increasingly pitted competitors (and regulators) against the company, and risks alienating customers over time."

As some examples, the analyst noted Apple's "limited disclosure practices, its attack on Adobe's Flash, its investigation into its lost iPhone prototype (which culminated in a reporter's home being searched while he was away and computers being removed), its restrictions on app development, and its ostensibly dismissive characterizations of the iPhone's antenna issues (i.e., phone needs to be held a different way; a software issue that affects the number of bars displayed)."

Sacconaghi further speculates that "these issues may, over time, begin to impact consumers' perceptions of Apple, undermining its enormous prevailing commercial success."

The report arrives just a day after Consumer Reports -- the nation's largest and most trusted nonprofit product review organization -- warned that it could no longer recommend the iPhone 4. After conducting its own tests inside a radio frequency isolation chamber, the organization issued a statement on its blog reversing its previous recommendation of the phone.

For its part, Apple earlier this month released an open letter stating that the iPhone 4's reception issues were largely due to an inaccurate formula for calculating signal strength. The company assured that a free software fix would be available in the coming weeks. Consumer Reports' findings are in opposition to Apple's statement.

Another Wall Street analyst, Gene Munster with Piper Jaffray, estimated Tuesday that a fix from Apple could impact its operating income by 1 percent. Like Sacconaghi, Munster also suggested the possibility of issuing free bumper cases. Additionally, the analyst said that since only 25 percent of users are affected by the issue, the company could "weather the storm" by doing nothing.

Apple stock was down $5.49 (2.13%) at the market's close on Tuesday.

Seems like Apple is the new BP. CNBS can't get a word in edgewise without bringing up the iPhone. Re the great CS test, seems like they were using a weak signal.
post #76 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by iLoveStuff View Post

A free bumper with your iPhone4 and be done with it!!!

The 25% it affects don't like to use cases, so a free Bumper - which some argue is an ugly case - is no solution at all.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
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post #77 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by ouragan View Post

Only a fool would ignore the seriousness of the iPhone 4 antenna and reception issues. Deleting message threads mentionning the Consumer Report article is childish and definitely not the leadership that iPhone buyers are expecting.

Apple deleted them because it was a support forum and no one was there for support - it was just another whine-fest. Why should Apple let its legitimate support get crowded out by incessant, useless whining (much of it stirred up by the competition, no doubt).

Quote:
Originally Posted by iBill View Post

Stock manipulation anyone?

No, just a feeding frenzy fed by HTC, Google, RIM, and the inveterate Apple-haters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

If you go to cnn.com right now the headline is: iPhone 4 can be fixed with duct tape. This is well beyond Apple's competitors and a few discontented bloggers.

These stories do take on a life of their own - and then they disappear when reality eventually hits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince_JT View Post

And what good is any improved antenna and reception if the signal can degrade more than any of the other handset in there test... from just holding it? Did you even read the full report or just the bit that you wanted to read?

Did YOU read the full report - or just the bit you wanted to read? Both CR and Anand's tests show that, EVEN WITH THE SIGNAL DEGRADATION, the phone reception is better than the competition. In fact, it's funny to see people citing CR as a valid source for their complaints - yet CR rated the iPhone 4 as the best phone on the market.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince_JT View Post

PS: if the antenna is so improved, then why use a case? You don't need it. Take it off and hold it normally, preferably in your left hand.

Because 'best' doesn't mean that it can't be even better. Not to mention, of course, that some people use cases to protect their significant investment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

I don't think it was arrogant and asinine as much as not well thought out. When Jobs (or one of his minions behind the scenes) wrote that, no one - including Jobs - know how big of a deal this would turn out to be.

I wouldn't say it wasn't well thought out, I think your second sentence is closer to the truth. Their tests showed that the phone worked very well - later confirmed by Anand and CR, so their tests weren't wrong. Either they didn't see the problem - because you really do have to hold the phone unnaturally to experience it - or they figured that simply shifting your finger a few mm was such a minor issue that no one in their right mind would care.

If they underestimated anything, it's that they are such a divisive company. While a lot of their customers love their products, there is also a big cloud of people out there who absolutely hate Apple and everything they do - and who will stop at nothing to stir up trouble. Last spring, it was all the Flash 'developers' - and that whining has finally died down (thank goodnesss). Now, it's the Android shills. That will die down, too.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
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post #78 of 108
They're not having mine back - it works perfectly... No issues here (or for anyone else I know who owns one, except one that literally died after a week, replaced no questions asked, with apology and free bumper at the apple store.
post #79 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glgbnaf View Post

I'm one of the 1.7 million who got scammed on a flawed device!

No you're not. iPhone 4 hasn't even been released in your country.
post #80 of 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by irnchriz View Post


A little side note: has any of these tests made it clear that their is only signal degradation then in 3G mode?

Most iPhone owners I know switch 3G off unless they need the web whilst out and about.

I tried this with my case off and regardless of how hard I grip the phone the bars don't move.

Sorry, 3G as opposed to what? Would this be able to be turned off in other countries like Japan?
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