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Apple acquires online mapping company Poly9 - report - Page 2

post #41 of 51
I would love to see Apple manage something like this in a couple of years:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/innov8showca...t-the-ted.aspx

The competition in 3D mapping and augmented reality between MS and Google has reached such fantastic heights, that new players may find it hard to catch up. Hopefully the acquisition of Poly9 will allow Apple to have some meaningful contribution to the field.
post #42 of 51
Apple has to be ready with some kind of maps in case Google pulls a fast one and doesn't make their maps work with Apple devices. They already don't offer their turn-by-turn app on the iPhone and iPad. What happens if they limit apples access to thir maps even more. Apple is just trying to be prepared and less dependant on Google for maps. I'm sure Apple is aware that they can't match Google's street view. That function is awesome and is a available for a large part of the world. The effort to do that is incredible and I don't think Apple wants to send camera cars all over the world. Apple does want to do as much as they reasonably can to improve their map independence, as far as I can tell.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

You'll be laughing out of the other side of your mouth when it happens.

Google maps isn't going anywhere. This may take some users away, but that's not enough to destroy it completely.

It's laughable that just because Apple takes up a map company, suddenly they'll have a monopoly on all things maps.
post #44 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

That Adobe (not just suddenly) does not give a crap about OSX even though a LOT of their business comes from OSX users.

It's a poorly run company, so it's not surprising that they don't behave logically.

Yeah, that's how you get to the top. You run your company poorly. Makes a lot of sense. Wait a second, Flash runs perfectly fine in Windows and it's no secret Microsoft worked with Adobe to help make it this way. No wait, it must be that Microsoft is paying them tons of money to purposely make flash in OSX run poorly...

Wake up, dude. Apple didn't work with Adobe like Microsoft did, and their users suffer for it.
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Google maps isn't going anywhere. This may take some users away, but that's not enough to destroy it completely.

It's laughable that just because Apple takes up a map company, suddenly they'll have a monopoly on all things maps.

It's laughable that you have somehow turned Apple replacing Google Maps in the iPhone Maps app with Apple Maps into Google Maps being destroyed and Apple having a monopoly on maps.

Just see the post prior to yours about why Apple will do this. The only thing I disagree with is that I don't think they will wait till Google cuts off map access, I think they'll do it before that happens, as in, as soon as they are ready.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Yeah, that's how you get to the top. You run your company poorly. Makes a lot of sense. Wait a second, Flash runs perfectly fine in Windows and it's no secret Microsoft worked with Adobe to help make it this way. No wait, it must be that Microsoft is paying them tons of money to purposely make flash in OSX run poorly...

Wake up, dude. Apple didn't work with Adobe like Microsoft did, and their users suffer for it.

You really need to take an elementary logic course.

Adobe "got to the top" (or wherever it is they are) by buying up competitors, oh and by Apple helping them out way back when. The rest of your post just doesn't consist of a valid argument, and more or less ignores the history of Adobe's Mac neglect, so, naturally, your conclusion is mistaken.
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

They already got in some hot water when they first launched Street View because they were taking pictures of people without their permission. They fixed it by writing a program for face recognition that automatically went through all the photos and found the faces and blurred them. One instance that was pretty funny involved a horse and buggy ride in Central Park, I believe, where the software blurred the horse's face as well. It was hilarious.

Christ, they're scanning my pets as well? Now I am paranoid.
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post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

I was reading how google's taking it a step further, taking photos of the insides of shops and restaurants in cities so you can actually click on a place and see what it's like inside...

Wonder how many businesses will participate, could cause some serious advertising confusion.
User: "Hey look, Wal-mart is having a sale on Blu-Ray players!"
*Arrives at store*
User: "Where are all the players, on google they were right here!!"
Manager: "Sir, those pictures are from 5 months ago."
User: "Google owes me gas money!!"

There may be a few stores that would do this but a lot I suspect would flat out refuse. You can not take pictures inside any facility without permission.
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by chronster View Post

Ok, now do you have an answer that's truthful? Not the same misinformation being spread over and over?

Lets look at the facts: Adobe writes software for OSX that runs just fine. They are not lacking in experience when it comes to software design. Apple does not work well with others, by Jobs' own admission. So knowing this, which is more plausible: That flash works better in Windows because MS worked with Adobe while Apple refuses, or that Adobe suddenly does not give a crap about OSX even though a LOT of their business comes from OSX users...

hmmm....

Flash works well in Windows because they use low level access to the hardware. Adobe wants to apply the same method to OSX, but Apple refused to allow them to have low level access to the hardware. No wonder because Adobe so lazy, it took almost 10 years to port creative suit to Cocoa.
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post #50 of 51
It's one way to get navigation on iOS. Now they just need to buy TomTom and be done with it.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by spliff monkey View Post

Christ, they're scanning my pets as well? Now I am paranoid.


They certainly are. The street-level view of my house clearly shows my dog in her outdoor kennel.
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