or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › RIM, Nokia respond to Apple's "Antennagate" press conference
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

RIM, Nokia respond to Apple's "Antennagate" press conference - Page 8

post #281 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

I watched the press conference and read the Q&A session as well. Thanks to Jason Snell's excellent work at MacWorld.

I came away satisfied and impressed with Apple's take on the 'problem.' I'll now sell my 3Gs and order an iPhone 4. If nothing else, but for the thinner form factor, 40% increased battery life and the improved camera with flash.

Apple's products are great and superior to anything else that is being manufactured from smart phones to laptops.

To expect a device to perform 100%, 100% of the time is unrealistic in the real world. I can see if it's an iPod which is a closed system and you want to play a song, then yes, it should work 100% of the time. But to expect a smart phone to never drop calls or have low reception at times is just setting yourself up for disappointment.

Based on the evidence presented, I agree with Jobs that it has been way overblown and for me is a non-issue.

I would encourage everyone to watch the video of the press conference. It is very informative and I learned a lot.

Steve should do one every Friday. Below is the link! Best.

http://events.apple.com.edgesuite.ne...ent/index.html

------------------------------------------------------

LOL !, LOL ! LOL!

I was amazed at the total slap-down Jobs did on the whole gang of mutts that were nipping at the heels of the champion - Apple.

What a transparently lousy version of the Jedi mind trick coming from the mutts!

They totally (try to) divert attention from the plain evidence of the videos.

Who are we to believe, them or our own lying eyes ?

Just the night before, I put the death grip on my wonderful 3GS and it took 8 seconds to drop bars and 8 seconds to bring them back up on release. Yet, I have dropped only two calls in the last six months. As soon as the proximity issue is addressed, I will get my G4 upgrade.

Well said Chris.

---gooddog
---gooddog

/
: * ] AAAAaaaRRRrrrFFFFff !!!
\
Reply
---gooddog

/
: * ] AAAAaaaRRRrrrFFFFff !!!
\
Reply
post #282 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolcat View Post

It'd be a super easy fix that wouldn't affect the appearance of the phone one bit. They could just apply some clear type of coating to the antennas that will keep our hands from touching them and causing all this BS....Can't believe they didn't do it in the first place when one of their OWN techs voiced concern...

This may still be the way they help the antenna situation although Apple denies the tech said anything about a problem.
post #283 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by fordyingseasons View Post

I demand a free case for my blackberry!!! I have no bars as well when I deathgrip it!

*******************************

I already have a rubber bumper.

I demand an iPhone4 for it !!!

Right now, I get no signal at all, no matter how I hold my bumper
---gooddog

/
: * ] AAAAaaaRRRrrrFFFFff !!!
\
Reply
---gooddog

/
: * ] AAAAaaaRRRrrrFFFFff !!!
\
Reply
post #284 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

Jobs exposed the industry's dirty little secret and now RIM and Nokia are crying about it. They need to fess-up too.

I think we just have some poor losers, Gizmodo, out there that want to take Apple down a few notches if they can.

The entity behind all of this was Gizmodo. And, they wanted to take on to apple for the issues we all know.

There can two possibilities either apple pulls the investigation or the come real hard on them and eventually destroying the Gizmodo.
post #285 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

Unfortunately it's not quite that easy. For the signal loss due to de-tuning of the antenna, yes, some sort of coating would be part of a solution, though a coating over the gap between the two would actually act as a capacitor, which is not a block to RF (it is to dc), so that in itself would de-tune the antenna (you can actually use a capacitor in your antenna circuit to change it's resonant frequency and tune it in). I would imagine they could make some tweaks inside in conjunction to a coating which would alleviate that however. It's 10 years since I did any work on antennas and to be honest my memory is a bit rusty.

What a clear coating would not help is the attenuating effect of the proximity of your hand. The attenuating effect of your hand is nothing to do with whether or not there is an insulator between your hand and the antenna, more it is to do with the fact that there is something that is mostly water (remember, we're about 70% water) which will happily soak up RF energy and lower the received (and transmitted) signal. The only way around that is to move the antenna away from your hand, which the bumper will do a bit, and moving the antenna inside would do.

However, from what I've seen (and I admit, I don't have an iPhone 4 to play with, so I'm Nbasing this off the videos I've seen), I suspect this problem is being caused almost entirely by de-tuning, and a coating, coupled with some internal tweaks would resolve it. I'm basing that on the idea that since a bumper does seem to solve the problem, and it only moves your hand a couple of mm away from the antenna, it's not really changing the attenuating effect of your hand, so the fact that it fixes the problem would point to de-tuning being the root cause).

That said, a clear coating is not exactly straightforward, given it will be going on an area of the phone that is handled/rubbed a lot, and would be sensitive to rubbing off. I'm not saying there is not such a coating out there, and there might be something really easy (I'm not a materials engineer), but I would think it's actually a bit of a challenge.

As I mentioned previously, a materials film and coating expert I met from Bayer Int'l thinks urethane provides the best combination of desired properties for coating the antenna.
post #286 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by samban View Post

...destroying the Gizmodo.

That should be fairly easy. Think about it. Does anyone honestly think the iPhone 4 prototype was the first stolen device Gizmodo has every paid money for? (And yes, folks, Gizmodo knew full well it was stolen too.) And do you honestly think they are not buying stolen property now? Therefore, it's just a matter of keeping a close eye on Gizmodo and then bringing their unlawful activities to light.
post #287 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

Don't do it! If you get one, there's only a 99.45% chance you'll be happy with it enough to keep it. And if you believe the flip-floppers over at Consumer Reports, you'll just be settling for the best smartphone on the market. You should demand more. Perhaps a cheap and clunky Nokia phone.



Don't you want a Nokia Hello Kitty phone? A plastic fantastic Dell Inspiron craptop loaded with shovelware?

Cheap, cheaper, Cheapest. Nokia Phones with high resolution displays such as 80x24 running the most advanced OS developed for 8-bit Micro controllers in their radical phone designs( Pink colors, cheap plastic).

Nokia's technological history is manufacturing rubber tyre.

They are pioneers in phone design ( big brick size ones), Superiorly advanced Symbian (aka Windows 3.1) and superiorly low price range of ($25 - $50)
post #288 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesw View Post

yes you are.

Get a life
post #289 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Well, if you have a point, make it. So far, all you've done is, as I've said, recycle garbage.


I have stated fact.


Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post

Yes, you should be very worried about the iPod Touch's cellular antenna. It may not be the product for you after all.

I was referring to poor engineering in general.
post #290 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by sennen View Post

no, i just don't believe that there are vast numbers of people out there who cbf'd calling apple care and are willing to spend thousands of dollars in putting up with a faulty product.

You are welcome to your beliefs.
post #291 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

The 1100 is a dual band 2G GSM phone, it has no WiFi, Bluetooth or 3G radios to take into consideration.

It is useless as a comparison.

Which is what I said in the first place. Maybe you should have replied to the person why gave it as an example in the first place.
post #292 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post

Do me a favor, use factual data to make comments and do not just use words for sake of it like 'massive'. It does not matter were you grip the phone on other smartphones, the point is the same effect happens. People grip their phones different depending on the design and their personal choice, so i doubt the way the experiments were undertaken in Apple labs are less credible.

Note: 0.55% of total ATT users registered an issue and return rate is 1/3 of that compared to 3GS.

Problem is once media fills people brains with garage, they have hard time releasing from the garage and continue to agree with such garage.

If I had been RIM and Nokia, I would have kept my mouth shut, because saying that its Apple's problem and you know, you have the same issue, well lets all act like ostrich stick our head in the ground.

Something that just caught my eye when browsing engadget:

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/17/h...ntage-pew-pew/

"Whereas Apple claimed over 0.55 percent of customers called AppleCare with reception-related complaints, HTC's Eric Lin told Pocket-lint the Droid Eris technical support rate was 0.016 percent, nearly thirty-four times lower"

Perhaps .55% is nothing to crow about? Just putting it out there. A number by itself may sound impressive but put into context and it takes on a different meaning altogether. I know nothing of the general or accepted rate of reception related issues but these two data points are quite disparate.
post #293 of 543
You are not comparing apples to apples so to speak...

If you have an HTC phone you would likely go to your Verizon store and ask their wonderful staff your support questions. Or call Verizon support. I suspect few people would think of calling HTC directly. Oh yes... let's get transferred to their overseas call center.

On the iPhone you have multiple options. Go to you local AT&T store and get assistance from their helpful staff. Or go to your Apple store and talk with someone there. Or call AppleCare. AppleCare is a big convenient target with with support people who, when I've called, genuinely seem to want to help you if there is a solution. It's a "path-of-least-resistance" easy call.

So IMHO the response from HTC on their comparative number of support calls doesn't really mean anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

Something that just caught my eye when browsing engadget:

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/17/h...ntage-pew-pew/

"Whereas Apple claimed over 0.55 percent of customers called AppleCare with reception-related complaints, HTC's Eric Lin told Pocket-lint the Droid Eris technical support rate was 0.016 percent, nearly thirty-four times lower"

Perhaps .55% is nothing to crow about? Just putting it out there. A number by itself may sound impressive but put into context and it takes on a different meaning altogether. I know nothing of the general or accepted rate of reception related issues but these two data points are quite disparate.
post #294 of 543
.

I've read most of the posts on most of the threads re antannagate for the last 22 days.

I pre-ordered and received my iP4 on June 23.

I have experienced no problems.

I bought a $20 case from Radio Shack. Soccer season has started and I will be out and about a lot and want protection for the phone: bumping, dropping, scratching, etc.

I've given it a lot of thought, and acting in total self-interest, here's what Apple needs to do to satisfy me:

1) Give me a free case valued at $30. I will sell it on eBay to recover the cost of buying a $20 case with a little extra for my time and trouble.

2) Give me a complete refund for the iPhone 4 -- including purchase price, taxes, activation fee, etc.

3) Let me keep the iPhone 4 -- it really is a wonderful phone.

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -

"The perfect [birth]day -- A little playtime, a good poop, and a long nap." - Tomato Greeting Cards -
Reply
post #295 of 543
What is Obamagate?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

First: Others have said that it, likely, would take several days to test each phone-- some tests run for 24 hours.

Second: What Apple showed at the press event was fair, but fairly innocuous. It should be pretty easy to duplicate what you saw without raising challenges.

If Apple were to do a thorough test of each phone measuring results on a common scale-- yes it would be useful. They may already have done this.

But, if Apple were to publish the results. it would open itself to all sorts of bad PR, criticism, lawsuits, for example:

-- How come you measured the old XYZ and not the New XYZ Plus
-- Your figures are totally wrong
-- your methodology is skewed to make the iPhone look better
-- prove your results
-- you don't understand the first thing about RF, signal strength, attenuation
-- how come you touched me here, you were supposed to touch me there
-- Your inaccurate numbers have had a negative effect on our sales

Can you imagine the firestorm if Apple did this-- bigger than Antennagate, Obamagate and BPgate combined.

What should happen is that an independent or regulatory organization should perform these tests to a common standard and publish the methodology and results for all to see-- no evaluation, no allowed to sell phone.

Are you listening CR? FCC?

,
post #296 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The iPhone 4 is the only phone that can go from 5 bars to 0 bars with the touch of a single finger at a small part of the case.

Apple is right to be criticized for this obvious design flaw. This is not standard attenuation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The iPhone 4 is the only phone that can go from 5 bars to 0 bars with the touch of a single finger at a small part of the case. *

Apple is right to be criticized for this obvious design flaw. *This is not standard attenuation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by g3pro View Post

The iPhone 4 is the only phone that can go from 5 bars to 0 bars with the touch of a single finger at a small part of the case. *

Apple is right to be criticized for this obvious design flaw. *This is not standard attenuation.

"Standard attenuation" ??? "Obvious design flaw" ??? *Let's get real... what we are all talking about here are devices that evolved from a one function cell phone to a complex, multifunction device. There are design compromises EVERYWHERE in these devices. All functions are weighted and carefully considered on multiple criteria, and the final product is a blend of the demands of the designer, the marketers, and the engineers.

Everyone would love a device that never has to recharge, and that does everything you can imagine...that is the dream that keeps these companies working hard for the consumer. Will a "perfect" device ever exist? Depends what perfect means to the individual, but Apple is consistently is leading the industry, a pretty impressive performance, after only three years of *experience in the market.

I recall the CEO of Nokia publicly laughing off the first gen iPhone in 2007. *Where is he now? *He is in the process of most probably being ousted by an angry mob of Nokia shareholders, for failing to providing a Nokia answer to that very device he laughed at. *Steve Balmer reacted in the same manner...is he next? *
post #297 of 543
[QUOTE=g3pro;1678005]The iPhone 4 is the only phone that can go from 5 bars to 0 bars with the touch of a single finger at a small part of the case.

Apple is right to be criticized for this obvious design flaw. This is not standard attenuation.

"Standard attenuation" ??? "Obvious design flaw" ??? *Let's get real... what we are all talking about here are devices that evolved from a one function cell phone to a complex, multifunction device. There are design compromises EVERYWHERE in these devices. All functions are weighted and carefully considered on multiple criteria, and the final product is a blend of the demands of the designer, the marketers, and the engineers.

Everyone would love a device that never has to recharge, and that does everything you can imagine...that is the dream that keeps these companies working hard for the consumer. Will a "perfect" device ever exist? Depends what perfect means to the individual, but Apple is consistently is leading the industry, a pretty impressive performance, after only three years of *experience in the market.

I recall the CEO of Nokia publicly laughing off the first gen iPhone in 2007. *Where is he now? *He is in the process of most probably being ousted by an angry mob of Nokia shareholders, for failing to providing a Nokia answer to that very device he laughed at. *Steve Balmer reacted in the same manner...is he next? *
post #298 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

I have stated fact.

speculating the existence of hidden masses of dis-satisfied iPhone users is fact?

Quote:
I was referring to poor engineering in general.

apple is not perfect, but oh dear.
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
Reply
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
Reply
post #299 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

and is useless for me for the reasons I outlined in a previous post because the issue at hand will directly affect me.

i also have a 3gs and hold it in my left hand for phone calls (when not using the headphones, which i vastly prefer to use). i carry mine in a soft "foofcase", but apart from a screen protector it is "naked" when in use. for the iPhone 4, i feel a case, if you actually needed one (which isn't certain by any means) isn't too big a compromise considering how "non-bulky" they can be.

when you mention "should i take a risk" on the 4, what immediately came into mind was the stat of there being far fewer returns of 4's compared to 3gs' in the same period. it seems there was more "risk" with the 3gs.

IF you were so unlucky as to have meaningful issues with a 4, i doubt that you would be left without a phone. after a call to applecare and making an appointment at the nearest apple store, i had my 3gs replaced on the spot (and for free) for a superficial crack in the rear case. worst case scenario is you take it back for a complete refund and go back to your 3gs. that's how i feel about it anyway. good luck with your decision.
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
Reply
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
Reply
post #300 of 543
How did "My iPhone drops calls when I hold it in my left hand" evolve into this DEATH GRIP debacle?

Surely DEATH GRIP isn't the the reason for people's original complaints? Why do people go on about DEATH GRIP so much when it obviously isn't the source of the hysteria.

Apple has done well to deflect attention away from the real issue.
post #301 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by sennen View Post

speculating the existence of hidden masses of dis-satisfied iPhone users is fact?

As I have said to others, you can choose to believe what you want, but I believe in this case you are wrong. I can't provide you with hard data, but all you can provide is compaints to Apple, Steve didn't mention the people that complained to their providers. At the end of the day, human nature is human nature.



Quote:
Originally Posted by sennen View Post

apple is not perfect, but oh dear.

Are you saying the way Apple handled this issue was not perfect, and it won't put people off purchasing items off them again? Try to remember in customer servers departments, generally a rule is if someone has a bad experience with something, they will tell 10 people, if they have a good experience they may tell 1 person. Saying everyone does it so it's not my fault is a good example of poor customer service.
post #302 of 543
"I was referring to poor engineering in general."
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
Reply
"We're Apple. We don't wear suits. We don't even own suits."
Reply
post #303 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

As I said, i don't own any Android devices, so why would I post there? I like to troll Apple fansites and I think I might have finally found something to justify it, so I'll ride it for all it's worth, even if I'm wrong, hence why I am here.

Fixed.
post #304 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Postulant View Post

Even still, Apple survived a media blitz that would have brought any other phone manufacturer to its knees.

The other phone companies HOPE that they will have problems like this because it will mean that they are selling millions of 1 phone model in a few weeks.
post #305 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8CoreWhore View Post

Apple isn't trying to draw them into the debacle, they're demonstrating there shouldn't be a debacle that all phones designers have challenges and the iPhone isn't unique in its recommended way of holding it ( in weak signal areas).

Yes but while that may be true with sme other companies, these other companies have many different models where Apple only has one. I've worked in the entertainment business for years and
I presently have the 3G model. This phone compared to more than any other phone my wife and I have owned drops more calls then most and has a terible tine going from edge to 3G
Some phones never.
post #306 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2oh1 View Post

,Remember the Toyotas-won't-stop problem from a few months ago? If the issue wasn't a Toyota issue, but instead a problem that was universal to all cars (or all sedans, regardless of the carmaker), you're damn right that I'd have wanted Toyota to point that out.

Your post points out the very danger apple faces. "Unintended acceleration" WAS shown to occur with other car brands. And the accusers ended up highly suspect: one blamed the devil; one was angry at toyo over a prior gripe; one sold her car without ever mentioning any accel problem; in one of the most spectacular recorded cases, police couldn't find evidence the driver had actually been pressing on the brake despite instructions given him. Heck, testing couldn't even replicate the problems, leaving all the cases suspect as incidents of operator error or malicious fraud.

But look how you and most of the public remember it.
post #307 of 543
Many studies have shown that about 52% of the American population is so staggeringly stupid, they can't pick out their own home state on a map.

I always keep this in mind when a "big issue" arises on a forum. You just have to let those who can't find their own ******* blow off their worthless uninformed opinion, and then when the dust settles, the rest of us can move forward and forget about it.
post #308 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

Something that just caught my eye when browsing engadget:

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/17/h...ntage-pew-pew/

"Whereas Apple claimed over 0.55 percent of customers called AppleCare with reception-related complaints, HTC's Eric Lin told Pocket-lint the Droid Eris technical support rate was 0.016 percent, nearly thirty-four times lower"

Perhaps .55% is nothing to crow about? Just putting it out there. A number by itself may sound impressive but put into context and it takes on a different meaning altogether. I know nothing of the general or accepted rate of reception related issues but these two data points are quite disparate.

I call BS. Almost no consumer device is going to have a 0.016% level of customer support calls. Heck, toasters probably get that many calls. Maybe they only had that many calls in the first hour after its launch.

By most reports, 0.55% complaints is a very reasonable level. If you don't like that figure, look at the return rate - less than 1/3 the return rate of the 3GS - which is highly regarded as one of the best phones on the market. This figure IS far lower than the rest of the industry average.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

As I have said to others, you can choose to believe what you want, but I believe in this case you are wrong. I can't provide you with hard data, but all you can provide is compaints to Apple, Steve didn't mention the people that complained to their providers. At the end of the day, human nature is human nature..

So, IOW, your fantasies don't agree with the facts, so we're supposed to believe your fantasies?

What about the return rates? If you are correct, why is the return rate less than 1/3 that of the 3GS at the same time point?

Quote:
Originally Posted by djsherly View Post

Then, what is the point of the endless posting of the same links? What do they prove? That Nokia is clever enough to put their antennas out of the reach of physical contact?

Because Nokia and RIM have the same problem - even WITH their antennas not being touched. And both made the mistake of going public with the claim that their phones don't have the problem. That was a huge, boneheaded mistake. If they had kept their mouths shut, the broad perception would have been that this was an Apple problem (with some percentage of people realizing that it was an industry-wide problem). By opening their mouths and making a claim that their phones aren't affected, they opened themselves to ridicule - which will come back to bite them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaulMJohnson View Post

Unfortunately it's not quite that easy. For the signal loss due to de-tuning of the antenna, yes, some sort of coating would be part of a solution, though a coating over the gap between the two would actually act as a capacitor, which is not a block to RF (it is to dc), so that in itself would de-tune the antenna (you can actually use a capacitor in your antenna circuit to change it's resonant frequency and tune it in). I would imagine they could make some tweaks inside in conjunction to a coating which would alleviate that however. It's 10 years since I did any work on antennas and to be honest my memory is a bit rusty.

What a clear coating would not help is the attenuating effect of the proximity of your hand. The attenuating effect of your hand is nothing to do with whether or not there is an insulator between your hand and the antenna, more it is to do with the fact that there is something that is mostly water (remember, we're about 70% water) which will happily soak up RF energy and lower the received (and transmitted) signal. The only way around that is to move the antenna away from your hand, which the bumper will do a bit, and moving the antenna inside would do.

However, from what I've seen (and I admit, I don't have an iPhone 4 to play with, so I'm basing this off the videos I've seen), I suspect this problem is being caused almost entirely by de-tuning, and a coating, coupled with some internal tweaks would resolve it. I'm basing that on the idea that since a bumper does seem to solve the problem, and it only moves your hand a couple of mm away from the antenna, it's not really changing the attenuating effect of your hand, so the fact that it fixes the problem would point to de-tuning being the root cause).

That said, a clear coating is not exactly straightforward, given it will be going on an area of the phone that is handled/rubbed a lot, and would be sensitive to rubbing off. I'm not saying there is not such a coating out there, and there might be something really easy (I'm not a materials engineer), but I would think it's actually a bit of a challenge.

Your conclusion is not as simple as it looks. You are correct that if you add a thin polymer coating to the antenna that you'd have to change the internals but that would be quite simple. You could then have a phone with a coating that works as well as the 'naked' phone.

HOWEVER, to get a detuning effect, you don't have to actually touch the antenna. If you get close to it, you can get the same detuning (if you're old enough to remember rabbit ear TV antennas, you'd remember that you could change the signal just by standing near the antenna without touching it). Even with a coating, if you hold the phone in your hand, you could still detune the antenna. Probably not as much, but still some. You're still going to get capacitance effects, even through a thin polymer coating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

See you would fall in that 0.55% figure that jobs pulled out. You would be suprised to see the actual number of people that complain about an issue they have.

Maybe we would. Why don't you provide the figures so we can find out if they're surprising?

Oh, you can't - because you're simply making wild guesses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Maybe Apple should have kept their mouths shut and not dragged others into their issue, after all it is the iPhone 4 that the iPhone users are having the issue with, not the other brands.

And THAT is why people keep posting links to all the Youtube videos and Apple's testing showing that other phones experience the same effect.

It's funny how you can jump all over Apple and iPhone fans by claiming that they'll ignore evidence of a problem and deny that the problem exists --- yet when extensive evidence is presented that the same thing occurs with other phones, you simply deny it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by spiced View Post

Did anyone is as sensitive as I'm when using cell phones? My head gets heated up after good 5 minutes of use....guess what phones? Many models of Nokia, Ericsson and Sony Ericssion. Make another guess.....all these phones of the past hangs! I've given up even the most simplest of phones from them.....but I've no choice to carry the current Nokia 5370, due to company's requirement to carry one, which also has a mind of its own...hangs!

Decided I'm going to get one iPhone4 once its available in little red dot....if it cooks my brain or just works 7x24...365.

One would think that if you're that sensitive to cell phone use that you'd have learned by now that there are headsets so that you don't have to hold the phone near your head.
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
"I'm way over my head when it comes to technical issues like this"
Gatorguy 5/31/13
Reply
post #309 of 543
Finally got my 4, and just in time. Wanted to take it with for testing on trip to Colorado. We've been all over this beautiful state's north central areas and I can report that I have had no problems. Calls get made and data served. In every way this phone outperforms my 3G. I am VERY satisfied. Even on a dude ranch in the middle of nowhere I could make calls. For naysayers, maybe the phone IS doing what critics say it's doing, but if it is, it's not causing me any problems in real world use.
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
A.k.a. AppleHead on other forums.
Reply
post #310 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

I have stated fact.

As has been pointed out, discredited FUD isn't fact.


Quote:
I was referring to poor engineering in general.

Let's look at what a stupid statement that is. You intimate that the next iPod Touch might have poor engineering. Now if we take the cellular functions away from the iP4, you would not have anything at all to criticize. (Ignoring for a moment that you have nothing real to criticize there.) So where would the possible poor engineering on an iPod Touch come in? Obviously nowhere.

It's statements like these by you that not only show what a silly troll you are, but that you aren't even an intelligent one.
post #311 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by pmz View Post

Many studies have shown that about 52% of the American population is so staggeringly stupid, they can't pick out their own home state on a map.

I always keep this in mind when a "big issue" arises on a forum. You just have to let those who can't find their own ******* blow off their worthless uninformed opinion, and then when the dust settles, the rest of us can move forward and forget about it.


Brings up a good point: Have visited several countries where the people could pick out my home state without ever having been to the US and now I live in Japan and haven't heard a fuss about the "Death Grip" here; the news carried the CR story, but that was the end of it. Wonder if there are major complaints arising in Europe?

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply

 

Your = the possessive of you, as in, "Your name is Tom, right?" or "What is your name?"

 

You're = a contraction of YOU + ARE as in, "You are right" --> "You're right."

 

 

Reply
post #312 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

One would think that if you're that sensitive to cell phone use that you'd have learned by now that there are headsets so that you don't have to hold the phone near your head.

This comment is unacceptable. It is entirely too logical for the discussion at hand.

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply

I admit to being a Fanatical Moderate. I Disdain the Inane. Vyizderzominymororzizazizdenderizorziz?

Reply
post #313 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

But doesn't Apple like telling people that their products are "magical"?


Only the iPad is magical. Try again.
post #314 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


Nokia and RIM should STFU and look into their own derivative, visionless organizations before they open their traps and complain about a company that isn't afraid to take risks and guides the entire industry.


Yeah. Who do they think they are, anyways? They have no right to criticize Apple.
post #315 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleSauce007 View Post

Nokia has known about this issue and now they are trying to claim that their phones are perfect?
They are full of it!


Nokia is well known to be full of it. They are running scared as Apple eats their lunch! They are desperate for anything, no matter how insignificant, so they can pounce.

Nokia is just plain pathetic. They should just sell everything and return the money to the stockholders.
post #316 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haggar View Post

But doesn't Apple like telling people that their products are "magical"?

Do you know where the phrase magical comes from ?

According to Jobs himself:

Steve Jobs was testing the iPad in the wild in Florida. Some woman came up to him as asked what was that - Just something we're working on Steve said, to which the girl replied it's magical.

Clearly Steve liked that comment. and used it.


Let's face it wouldn't you be proud of something you worked for years on? and when people praise it wouldn't you repeat that praise?


Apple aren't as smug as you think, sure there's some pride but that's in part an artists joy at having their work appreciated.
post #317 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by sennen View Post

Why cannot they work on a solution to this problem on the iPhone?


Apple has brilliant engineers - the best in the world.

But they don't have anybody on staff who can rewrite all the laws of science.

The engineers are not magicians, even though Apple devices often seem to work like magic.

Sorry to disappoint you.
post #318 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Postulant View Post

Can someone remind me what the return rate is for the iPhone 4? The ".55%" represented what???


The return rate for the iP4 is less than one-third of the rate for the 3GS, which is the most popular phone in the entire world. That is all we need to know.
post #319 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trajectory View Post

One has to wonder just how much companies like Nokia or RIM helped fan the flames of this fury, and how much fuel they actually contributed to the fire.


I mostly blame Google.
post #320 of 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by sennen View Post

no one missed this. what you are missing is that this appears to meaningfully effect a very very small number of iPhone 4 users,


A VERY small number of iP4 users. And every other cellphone on the planet has worse reception issues when held in certain ways. But the media has gone crazy and blown things WAY out of proportion.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › RIM, Nokia respond to Apple's "Antennagate" press conference