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Apple tightens iPhone App Store security, Wired prints piracy guide

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
Responding to piracy problems in the iTunes App Store, Apple has instituted stronger security measures to protect users' accounts.

Earlier this month, iTunes was hit by account fraud that resulted in a few hundred users--a relatively tiny proportion of iTunes accounts--discovering as much as several hundred dollars' worth of unauthorized charges on their accounts.

Apple responded by immediately deleting specific developers who appeared to be using the fraudulent purchases to inflate their sales rank, and is now adding a new layer of security that requires account holders to enter their credit card security code on each new computer or device they register with their account.

According to a report by the blog Different District, iTunes prompts users for their security code the first time they make a purchase from a new computer or device. This prevents malicious users from guessing simple passwords on users' accounts and reselling the information to fraudulent buyers.

The previous report filed by AppleInsider detailed how auction sites in China were reselling the account information for iTunes users and encouraging buyers to immediately make as many purchases as possible before the user discovered the purchases. Requiring a security code should prevent that type of fraud in the future.]

Apple's opposition to jailbreaking

While Apple hadn't sued any users over jailbreaking, it did petition the court not to allow the exemption, warning that the argument for the exemption, advanced by the EFF, was simply pushing a ideological software agenda which made poor assumptions about how much external experimentation Apple's successful business model could withstand.

Google's Android Market already lacks the security of iTunes App Store, and that has resulted in a weak commercial market where a critical mass of uses simply don't pay for anything. That has discouraged significant commercial development for Android and left it with little more than adware-based titles and hobbyist apps.

In addition to complaining that widespread jailbreaking could result in piracy levels that turn the App Store into a failed market, Apple also noted that jailbreaking has an impact on "a number of essential safety and control functions," and that modified operating system software could result in overheating or in overcharging of the battery, resulting in actual physical damage to the device.

Apple also noted that a hacked baseband could result in operational damage to the mobile network, a claim which many critics scoff at despite the fact that baseband software is highly regulated for this very reason. Apple also complained that users who jailbreak their phones generate millions of software crash reports that are sent to the company to investigate at its own expense.
post #2 of 43
Quote:
Apple also noted that a hacked baseband could result in operational damage to the mobile network, a claim which many critics scoff at despite the fact that baseband software is highly regulated for this very reason.

No-one has any interest in hacking the baseband beyond SIM unlocking. There's simply no point. Networks drop badly behaving phones.

If it was a problem, why haven't Android, Symbian or Windows Mobile hackers brought down networks already? The full source code for the first two are available.
post #3 of 43
I'm glad they took it down. If I was a developer trying to make a living off the App Store I'd be cancelling my subscription about now.
post #4 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I'm glad they took it down. If I was a developer trying to make a living off the App Store I'd be cancelling my subscription about now.

..... I stopped reading it years ago.
post #5 of 43
Hmmm...

...might have to try that guide on the wired App and share it with my uncle from Torrento.

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post #6 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Apple's opposition to jailbreaking

While Apple hadn't sued any users over jailbreaking, it did petition the court not to allow the exemption, warning that the argument for the exemption, advanced by the EFF, was simply pushing a ideological software agenda which made poor assumptions about how much external experimentation Apple's successful business model could withstand.

Google's Android Market already lacks the security of iTunes App Store, and that has resulted in a weak commercial market where a critical mass of uses simply don't pay for anything. That has discouraged significant commercial development for Android and left it with little more than adware-based titles and hobbyist apps.

In addition to complaining that widespread jailbreaking could result in piracy levels that turn the App Store into a failed market, Apple also noted that jailbreaking has an impact on "a number of essential safety and control functions," and that modified operating system software could result in overheating or in overcharging of the battery, resulting in actual physical damage to the device.

Apple also noted that a hacked baseband could result in operational damage to the mobile network, a claim which many critics scoff at despite the fact that baseband software is highly regulated for this very reason. Apple also complained that users who jailbreak their phones generate millions of software crash reports that are sent to the company to investigate at its own expense.

Absolutely. Truth in every word. Apparently, your favorite audience, Apple, needs no more, than clashing over discounted stuff in walmarts.
And we've got our popcorn and are now in the front row to see how ``market powers' ' are gonna build perfect products.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #7 of 43
I am impressed with Appleinsider's in-depth coverage of news. Whereas most apple websites do shallow reporting and try to just be quick to report news events as they happen, appleinsider covers news more deeply and gathers all related information. Nice.

As fare as the story goes, I agree that wired showuldnt have posted the How-to on piracy.

Jailbreaking is essentially bad.. Instead ideally Apple itself should provide a section of the App store titled 'Unapproved' or something, and list all these apps there. So no need fopr complicated hacks and waiting for the hackers to develop tools for the latest version.
post #8 of 43
Wired magazine used to be a respected magazine. They sure have turned into pond scum for the masses.
post #9 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

It's a bullshit publication for morons anyway. I stopped reading it years ago.

Yeah, wired, schmired. That said, pirating apps is amazingly, amazingly easy. However you can't jailbreak iPhone4 and iPhone3GS new bootrom running iOS4.

Why hasn't Apple tried to shut down the repositories hosting the cracked apps?
post #10 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

...with Kahney noting ... I’ve always liked publications that informed me about things we’re not supposed to do. I can then make my own moral decision whether to act on that information or not.

Are you kidding me? What's next month, a WIRED guide to bombmaking equipment, a WIRED guide to how to cook Crystal Meth for your friends, a WIRED guide to finding Child Porn on the net?

And it will be okay because EVERYONE who gets their grubby little hands on the information will be a good little geek and make the CORRECT moral choice so WIRED is absolved of all moral responsibility? That's not an adequate excuse.

They're abetting pirates and leaving people open to theft and abuse.
post #11 of 43
"Apple also noted that a hacked baseband could result in operational damage to the mobile network, a claim which many critics scoff at despite the fact that baseband software is highly regulated for this very reason." ~ AppleInsider

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichL View Post

No-one has any interest in hacking the baseband beyond SIM unlocking. There's simply no point. Networks drop badly behaving phones.

If it was a problem, why haven't Android, Symbian or Windows Mobile hackers brought down networks already? The full source code for the first two are available.

Yeah, so far, it does appear that hackers only want to hack the baseband to unlock the SIM. Malicious hackers would prefer to steal personal data from hacked phones, rather than, say, DoS attack AT&T or something like that. Could there be inadvertent fiddling with the mobile network due to running a hacked baseband? Maybe, but we haven't really seen this yet, unless AT&T and other providers come out and say (and prove) it does.

Or like you say, maybe the mobile networks are robust enough that they drop bad phones, block the IMEI and so on. I think during the time (in the past decade) when there was a lot of mobile phone theft and "cloning" of phones etc. etc. mobile network providers beefed up their security.

I've said it before, the telco industry is a very, very strange beast indeed.

"Apple also complained that users who jailbreak their phones generate millions of software crash reports that are sent to the company to investigate at its own expense. "

This is probably a huge problem for Apple, telcos and all kinds of resellers. Tons of people complaining they don't know what's going on, usually because their friend/ relative/ local tech shop jailbreaked their phone the moment they got it, with the actual user not even knowing what jailbreaking is all about.
post #12 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banalltv View Post

Are you kidding me? What's next month, a WIRED guide to bombmaking equipment, a WIRED guide to how to cook Crystal Meth for your friends, a WIRED guide to finding Child Porn on the net?

And it will be okay because EVERYONE who gets their grubby little hands on the information will be a good little geek and make the CORRECT moral choice so WIRED is absolved of all moral responsibility? That's not an adequate excuse.

They're abetting pirates and leaving people open to theft and abuse.

Yup, we don't need Wired, Google does that all for us. Seriously, the next question has to do with Google. You can find virtually any evil in the world thanks to Google.

Crystal Meth? No worries, tons of top search results on that:
http://www.google.com.my/search?clie...e+crystal+meth

For the record, I agree, WTF is Wired posting this stuff for? I mean, it (used to be) a reputable, respected, "cutting-edge" publication.
post #13 of 43
I did not steal that Wired magazine from the news stand - I was only trying it before I buy it.
post #14 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

I stopped reading it years ago.

Yeah, it is. I find it weird how Apple somehow brings out all these journalistic rats out of the woodwork.
post #15 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Wired said the guide was published "after a flood of Cult of Mac reader emails" requested it

I bought the first iPad issue of WIRED and I must admit I was very impressed with virtually everything in it. In fact, I didn't object to the price having spent decades in the publication arena.

I was holding off getting the next issue until my wife returned with her iPad.

Now, although my comments re WIRED's iPad introduction still stand, I will express my objection to their latest move by dropping their publication from my future library.
post #16 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banalltv View Post

Are you kidding me? What's next month, a WIRED guide to bombmaking equipment, a WIRED guide to how to cook Crystal Meth for your friends, a WIRED guide to finding Child Porn on the net?

And it will be okay because EVERYONE who gets their grubby little hands on the information will be a good little geek and make the CORRECT moral choice so WIRED is absolved of all moral responsibility? That's not an adequate excuse.

They're abetting pirates and leaving people open to theft and abuse.

Well said and I agree with you 100% . The only silver lining I see is Apple can use this as a guide on how to really make this a lot harder. That is the one benefit of hackers that brag, they enable fixes faster than might have otherwise been possible. Not that this is quite the same thing but I'd like to think a few brains at Apple are thinking of ways to make this all not so easy especially on the apps side. It sounds too simple but surely iOS should be made to check if the iPhone is hacked, if it is don't work. If they want to hack it and replace with another phone OS then that's fine.
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From Apple ][ - to new Mac Pro I've used them all.
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post #17 of 43
Very disappointed in WIRED!

I wonder if they even thought about there own magazine app being pirated and losing revenue from that. After all I would think it is the higher priced stuff (some would certainly say over priced) that would seem to be a prime target for piracy.
post #18 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

Well said and I agree with you 100% . The only silver lining I see is Apple can use this as a guide on how to really make this a lot harder. That is the one benefit of hackers that brag, they enable fixes faster than might have otherwise been possible. Not that this is quite the same thing but I'd like to think a few brains at Apple are thinking of ways to make this all not so easy especially on the apps side. It sounds too simple but surely iOS should be made to check if the iPhone is hacked, if it is don't work. If they want to hack it and replace with another phone OS then that's fine.

The Droid X has some kind of "efuse" that checks the OS before it boots. link It has been available for a while. I wonder why apple doesn't use this...
post #19 of 43
Quote:
Google's Android Market already lacks the security of iTunes App Store, and that has resulted in a weak commercial market where a critical mass of uses simply don't pay for anything.

uses?

USERS!

Waaaaaa. Quit crying. So apple didn't get it's way... It is better for all.

BTW, don't blame the Android Market or Phone for the failings of an Apple product.

Don't touch the black line!
post #20 of 43
Why in the F'n world would they give the Library of Congress this kind of power? Librarians controlling the world? Shameful. Idiots. Whatever.... IT's a bad idea! The reason Apple products work so well, and are so highly regarded is that they just work because of their tight controls. Now all the techtards are going to F-it all up.
post #21 of 43
.....
post #22 of 43
As I said...

Waaaaa

When was the last time you ran freeware on your MAC? You haven't' you mean to say you have only bought Apple sanction products? PUHLEASE


It is the same thing.

Waaaaaaa
post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by FreeRange View Post

Why in the F'n world would they give the Library of Congress this kind of power? Librarians controlling the world? Shameful. Idiots. Whatever.... IT's a bad idea! The reason Apple products work so well, and are so highly regarded is that they just work because of their tight controls. Now all the techtards are going to F-it all up.

So, then by your logic, Macs must work like shit, since Apple does not control what you are allowed to use on Macs. That is your point right? That Macs must not work well compared to iOS devices because they are not locked down.

The rest of your post is similarly flawed and useless.

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...sometimes it's both
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post #24 of 43
How exactly have they 'screwed everything up'?

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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post #25 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpcg View Post

The Droid X has some kind of "efuse" that checks the OS before it boots. link It has been available for a while. I wonder why apple doesn't use this...

I would think that Apple's time is spent doing something else.
post #26 of 43
Oh, putain! Linuxoids are so hilarious.

``Beach ball' ', linuxoids, we're calling ``beach ball' '.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #27 of 43
Heyyyy... where'd the WIRED stuff go out of the original article?

appleinsider.com/articles/10/07/27/apple_tightens_iphone_app_store_security_wired_pri nts_piracy_guide.html
post #28 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Absolutely. Truth in every word. Apparently, your favorite audience, Apple, needs no more, than clashing over discounted stuff in walmarts.
And we've got our popcorn and are now in the front row to see how ``market powers' ' are gonna build perfect products.

In reality, this changes nothing, as jailbreaking was legal before this ruling. All this does is to spell it out more clearly.

I think that there's too much fuss being made over this. In addition, this is going to affect RIM and Microsoft just as much. It will affect every phone maker, smartphones or not, as the perception will be that something has changed. It hasn't.
post #29 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Yeah, wired, schmired. That said, pirating apps is amazingly, amazingly easy. However you can't jailbreak iPhone4 and iPhone3GS new bootrom running iOS4.

Why hasn't Apple tried to shut down the repositories hosting the cracked apps?

That's up to the developers with apps there. There are cracked apps everywhere. There are cracked computer programs everywhere too. Just look at newsgroups. There are entire newsgroups devoted to cracked applications, books, video, music, etc.
post #30 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

"Apple also noted that a hacked baseband could result in operational damage to the mobile network, a claim which many critics scoff at despite the fact that baseband software is highly regulated for this very reason." ~ AppleInsider



Yeah, so far, it does appear that hackers only want to hack the baseband to unlock the SIM. Malicious hackers would prefer to steal personal data from hacked phones, rather than, say, DoS attack AT&T or something like that. Could there be inadvertent fiddling with the mobile network due to running a hacked baseband? Maybe, but we haven't really seen this yet, unless AT&T and other providers come out and say (and prove) it does.

So far. How many people would have believed that a REAL plot to hijack airliners and crash them into the Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and other places would really happen? Not many, I would think.

Quote:
Or like you say, maybe the mobile networks are robust enough that they drop bad phones, block the IMEI and so on. I think during the time (in the past decade) when there was a lot of mobile phone theft and "cloning" of phones etc. etc. mobile network providers beefed up their security.

I doubt if any system is that robust.
post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

In reality, this changes nothing, as jailbreaking was legal before this ruling. All this does is to spell it out more clearly.

I think that there's too much fuss being made over this. In addition, this is going to affect RIM and Microsoft just as much. It will affect every phone maker, smartphones or not, as the perception will be that something has changed. It hasn't.

Mel. Read your US legislation materials instead of repeating mantras after retarded snow pissers.
Quote:
§ 1201. Circumvention of copyright protection systems
(a) Violations Regarding Circumvention of Technological Measures.—
(1)
(A) No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title. ... [enacted Oct. 28, 1998]

(2) No person shall manufacture, import, offer to the public, provide, or otherwise traffic in any technology, product, service, device, component, or part thereof, that—

In reality... In reality, Mel, hordes of well-established bullshitters never ever dared publish vandalization guides before the ruling of those librarians of yours encouraged them. Until recently, it remained niche hobbyist time trashing.

In reality, Mel, this ruling is gonna impact severely Apple's AppStore and not solely the fart stuff in it but primarily truly valuable development efforts for the platform.

In reality, Mel, all that just brings what one can enjoy inside his own bedpan to the level of the official legislation.

What have I got to do with your RIM and Microsoft? Could care less about how they're now breathing.
Software developers will start leaving AppStore and seeding half-baked untested shit around instead.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

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People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #32 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banalltv View Post

Heyyyy... where'd the WIRED stuff go out of the original article?

appleinsider.com/articles/10/07/27/apple_tightens_iphone_app_store_security_wired_pri nts_piracy_guide.html

I don't know where the Wired stuff from this article went, but I can guess: Neither Wired Magazine nor Wired.com publish the CultofMac blog. The editor and publisher of the blog, Leander Kahney, worked at Wired.com for years but left more than a year ago. So the CultofMac posting about pirating apps -- which, by the way, has since been removed from the site -- had nothing to do with Wired.

-Joanna Pearlstein
Senior Editor, Research
WIRED Magazine
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jopearl View Post

I don't know where the Wired stuff from this article went, but I can guess: Neither Wired Magazine nor Wired.com publish the CultofMac blog. The editor and publisher of the blog, Leander Kahney, worked at Wired.com for years but left more than a year ago. So the CultofMac posting about pirating apps -- which, by the way, has since been removed from the site -- had nothing to do with Wired.

-Joanna Pearlstein
Senior Editor, Research
WIRED Magazine

Good to hear, I wondered what happened. Sounds like maybe the article author got a bit of foot-in-mouth about it.

It would have been nice to see a correction though, otherwise you have people getting a false impression of Wired for something Wired didn't do.
post #34 of 43
The ``Guide' ' was perfectly available at easily accessible location on Wired.com site this morning. The piece contained step-by-step instructions and screenshots of JB process.
Reader was also presented an advise on how to cheat and abuse Apple's warranty, when claiming Apple service for JB phone.

The guide is no more easily accessible for site visitors; though still can be found there.

For the better.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Mel. Read your US legislation materials instead of repeating mantras after retarded snow pissers.


In reality... In reality, Mel, hordes of well-established bullshitters never ever dared publish vandalization guides before the ruling of those librarians of yours encouraged them. Until recently, it remained niche hobbyist time trashing.

In reality, Mel, this ruling is gonna impact severely Apple's AppStore and not solely the fart stuff in it but primarily truly valuable development efforts for the platform.

In reality, Mel, all that just brings what one can enjoy inside his own bedpan to the level of the official legislation.

What have I got to do with your RIM and Microsoft? Could care less about how they're now breathing.
Software developers will start leaving AppStore and seeding half-baked untested shit around instead.

You've only quoted a part of it. There's a much more important part that's already been decided in court cases, and that directly pertains to jailbreaking, which the parts you quoted do not.

Quote:
(f) Reverse Engineering.—
(1) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a)(1)(A), a person who has lawfully obtained the right to use a copy of a computer program may circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a particular portion of that program for the sole purpose of identifying and analyzing those elements of the program that are necessary to achieve interoperability of an independently created computer program with other programs, and that have not previously been readily available to the person engaging in the circumvention, to the extent any such acts of identification and analysis do not constitute infringement under this title.
(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections (a)(2) and (b), a person may develop and employ technological means to circumvent a technological measure, or to circumvent protection afforded by a technological measure, in order to enable the identification and analysis under paragraph (1), or for the purpose of enabling interoperability of an independently created computer program with other programs, if such means are necessary to achieve such interoperability, to the extent that doing so does not constitute infringement under this title.
(3) The information acquired through the acts permitted under paragraph (1), and the means permitted under paragraph (2), may be made available to others if the person referred to in paragraph (1) or (2), as the case may be, provides such information or means solely for the purpose of enabling interoperability of an independently created computer program with other programs, and to the extent that doing so does not constitute infringement under this title or violate applicable law other than this section.
(4) For purposes of this subsection, the term “interoperability” means the ability of computer programs to exchange information, and of such programs mutually to use the information which has been exchanged.

This covers the issues quite well, and was designed as part of the DCMA for that very purpose. IBM has recently won a lawsuit over this issue, as have others.

The new wording adds nothing legal to this. It only make it more obvious to those, such as yourself, who aren't aware that this is already legal.

Where they mention "infringement" They are talking about the software being made for the purpose of making illegal copies of the software protected from this action by the DCMA.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jopearl View Post

I don't know where the Wired stuff from this article went, but I can guess: Neither Wired Magazine nor Wired.com publish the CultofMac blog. The editor and publisher of the blog, Leander Kahney, worked at Wired.com for years but left more than a year ago. So the CultofMac posting about pirating apps -- which, by the way, has since been removed from the site -- had nothing to do with Wired.

-Joanna Pearlstein
Senior Editor, Research
WIRED Magazine


Aw, no conspiracy then. But, good to hear, thanks for taking the time.
post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You've only quoted a part of it.

17 USC § 1201. Circumvention of copyright protection systems
Quote:
(f) Reverse Engineering.—
(1) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (a)(1)(A), a person who has lawfully obtained the right to use a copy of a computer program may circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a particular portion of that program for the sole purpose of identifying and analyzing those elements of the program that are necessary to achieve interoperability of an independently created computer program with other programs, and that have not previously been readily available to the person engaging in the circumvention, to the extent any such acts of identification and analysis do not constitute infringement under this title.

Absolutely. This is the case of Apple's iPhone Developer Program.

It's by no means the case of Cydia developers and by no means the case of an end user of Cydia application.
And Apple Insider's attempts to ``offer to the public' ' services like those were as well completely unlawful.


Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

The new wording adds nothing legal to this. It only make it more obvious to those, such as yourself, who aren't aware that this is already legal.

The discussed ruling is by no means a new wording of that code. You keep trying to mitigate its impact. The ruling introduces the exception to the part (a)(1)(A) for all cases not previously covered by the section (f).
This was precisely what I was explaining to you above. The scientific and niche use case was replaced with much wider general usage one. Sadly, but you are absolutely lost in the topic and can not offer anything more interesting than mantras of jailbreakers.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

17 USC § 1201. Circumvention of copyright protection systems

Absolutely. This is the case of Apple's iPhone Developer Program.

It's by no means the case of Cydia developers and by no means the case of an end user of Cydia application.
And Apple Insider's attempts to ``offer to the public' ' services like those were as well completely unlawful.

You're wrong. Apple's developer program has nothing to do with this.

Quote:
The discussed ruling is by no means a new wording of that code. You keep trying to mitigate its impact. The ruling introduces the exception to the part (a)(1)(A) for all cases not previously covered by the section (f).
This was precisely what I was explaining to you above. The scientific and niche use case was replaced with much wider general usage one. Sadly, but you are absolutely lost in the topic and can not offer anything more interesting than mantras of jailbreakers.

My wife is an attorney with considerable experience in these areas. We discuss this on a regular basic, as I had to deal with similar problems in my own businesses. Her reading of this is the same as mine, and I'm willing to bet that it would be for others in the business. Before this "new" ruling, this was discussed in the media, where it was pointed out that it was legal.

If it hadn't been legal, which even Apple agreed that it was, they would likely have sued those writing the software, as they did Psystar, but they didn't, because they would not have had a case.
post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

You're wrong. Apple's developer program has nothing to do with this.

No, no, I'm not. Some development tasks and steps are all about exactly that. And developer's enrollment fee, in particular, opens door of precisely that section (f). Apple is not taking our money for nothing. You, however, prove the topic is not actually your province, I then probably should not go too far in details.

Quote:
Originally Posted by melgross View Post

My wife is an attorney with considerable experience in these areas. We discuss this on a regular basic, as I had to deal with similar problems in my own businesses. Her reading of this is the same as mine, and I'm willing to bet that it would be for others in the business. Before this "new" ruling, this was discussed in the media, where it was pointed out that it was legal.

If it hadn't been legal, which even Apple agreed that it was, they would likely have sued those writing the software, as they did Psystar, but they didn't, because they would not have had a case.

Unfortunately, Mel, anonymous presenting credentials on the modern web has nothing to do with understanding the problem. On the contrary, this often means presenter has no valid arguments. And discussions in media can not help that.
You (and, unfortunately, I) will soon see, what happens, if JB'ing is legal, as it is now upon the recent exemption to the Code.

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

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post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

No, no, I'm not. Some development tasks and steps are all about exactly that. And developer's enrollment fee, in particular, opens door of precisely that section (f). Apple is not taking our money for nothing. You, however, prove the topic is not actually your province, I then probably should not go too far in details.

This has nothing to do with licensed developer programs. This has everything to do with unlicensed individuals or companies writing software to allow them to access a device so that their, or other's software will work with it. Are you sure you read the quoted portion of the DMCA carefully? It's really very clear. I don't know why you insist its saying something else. It's why these guys who cracked the DVD and Blue-Ray encryption haven't been sued, or thrown in jail either.

It's obvious I know quite a bit more about this topic than you do. Or you're trying to prove something you know is wrong for your own personal reasons.


Unfortunately, Mel, anonymous presenting credentials on the modern web has nothing to do with understanding the problem. On the contrary, this often means presenter has no valid arguments. And discussions in media can not help that.
You (and, unfortunately, I) will soon see, what happens, if JB'ing is legal, as it is now upon the recent exemption to the Code.[/QUOTE]

You have no valid arguments, and unlike myself, rarely seem to. You come very close to trolling.
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