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Millions of Android users hit by malicious data theft app - Page 3

post #81 of 211
Goodbye Mac vs. PC ads. Hello iPhone vs. Droid ad campaign.

"Hi, I'm an iPhone"
"And I'm a Droid"

"Hey Droid, do you have problems with viruses?"
"Well actually, iPhone, I..." [battery dies]
post #82 of 211
Just had to create an account for this. The hatred here towards android is scary. For the record I own and have owned many products from both sides of this discussion.

I'm currently an Android user, I own an iPad, Macbook and PC and I don't and never will understand what can only be described as the fan boy behavior occurring on this thread.

Lets face it, if it weren't for Android, Apples major rival, there would be very little to no competition, causing the entire mobile market to become almost stagnant. Unless everyone here has very large steaks in AAPL you really should be glad of the competition which drives innovation. Now quit all this silly gloating and respect that both the App store and the Android market place both have their weaknesses and strengths . \
post #83 of 211
So on Android, we have Google watching, listening, and recording every move we make (presumably this is legal) and now we have a bunch of hackers doing the same (illegally).

Android = Hemorroid.

I like my 'closed' system on the iPhone.
post #84 of 211
Strange, my Mac is jail broken. I can download what I want on it when I want. Don't really see that as a problem. Apple has implemented adequate protection measures there. Yet, when it comes to the iPhone somehow people are advocating it be totally controlled by Apple and Apple is advocating it can't protect jail broken phones.

I wonder what people will think when Apple starts putting iOS on it's Macs and has them locked down as well. For what it is worth, this could have happened to an app in the app store as well. Recently, Apple removed applications from stealing people's iTunes account information and using it to purchase applications. Further, there was an application that was sold as a spot light application, but really had the hidden talent of allowing tethering.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

See Apple told you so!

For those the jailbreak their iPhones they are more likely to get played by malware writers. Now that it is legal to jailbreak I'm sure more people will do it. We may even see a lawsuit from jailbroken iPhone users claiming Apple didn't protect them enough.
post #85 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by TBell View Post

Strange, my Mac is jail broken. I can download what I want on it when I want. Don't really see that as a problem. Apple has implemented adequate protection measures there. Yet, when it comes to the iPhone somehow people are advocating it be totally controlled by Apple and Apple is advocating it can't protect jail broken phones.

I wonder what people will think when Apple starts putting iOS on it's Macs and has them locked down as well.

Well said TBell. Since the dawn of the computing age until the iPhone, it was completely up to the user what software they were allowed to install on there computers. Admittedly the iOS method is very safe, but poses some very strict limitations.

I'd like to pose the question and I'm not being sarcastic here, I genuinely want to see peoples opinions. Why not put iOS or similar on all apple products, from iPod to Macs?
post #86 of 211
Until Jobs and his minions start believing that apple owners have enough intelligence to change the batteries in their products, Apple and its fanboys should stop bashing any other product, including Android.

How soon we forget about that "great" antenna design on the eyeFone 4.
post #87 of 211
One thing i don't get. The article mentions that 23% of the iPhone apps incorporated third party code (which may include malicious functions). So why is everybody being so happy while also they are maybe infected (although with a lower chance)?

// posting from a iMac so no mac-hater here
post #88 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

An app distributed by Google's Android Market has collected private data from millions of users and forwarded it to servers China, validating Apple's uniquely strong stance on mobile security in the iPhone App Store.....

Besides the obvious, I think the lesson here is also ... why the heck is a "wallpaper app" allowed in the Android store or the app store in the first place?

These kind of apps are what people point to when they talk about the "crud" in the Apple app store. They serve no purpose other than directing a user to a private website which can of course be dubious. Apple might have an app with the same problem right now. The malicious code could just as easily be in the website you are connecting to as in the app.

These kind of apps should be web apps at best or banned form the store otherwise. The only difference between this and a "regular" wallpaper app (of which there ate a great number), is that the payload of this one was data mining, whereas the payload of the others is advertising.

Equally nefarious IMO.
post #89 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by notafanboy View Post

Until Jobs and his minions start believing that apple owners have enough intelligence to change the batteries in their products, Apple and it’s fanboys should stop bashing any other product, including Android.

How soon we forget about that "great" antenna design on the eyeFone 4.

Of course we forget non-issues. You think comparing the fact that in a very weak signal area you can make your an iPhone lose a signal by gripping it tightly with a totally unsafe, unsecured eco system? Really?
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
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Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
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nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
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post #90 of 211
Is it me, or the text sounds a bit strange?

For example:

Quote:
Apps on any platform can access personal data and forward that data to an external server, but the Lookout research found that 47 percent of the selection of Android apps it looked at incorporated third party code (which may include malicious functions), while only 23 percent of analyzed iPhone apps did.

So they looked at apps from the market/appstore... I thought those app are 100%... so what are these numbers?!

Second:

Quote:
That doesn't necessarily mean iOS apps can't forward user data inappropriately however; Apple has discovered and pulled apps that have violated its privacy policies.

This kinda means "Ok, it already happened on iPhone as well"... or am I misunderstanding it?!

Pls enlighten me ;-)
post #91 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by bopppp View Post

One thing i don't get. The article mentions that 23% of the iPhone apps incorporated third party code (which may include malicious functions). So why is everybody being so happy while also they are maybe infected (although with a lower chance)?

// posting from a iMac so no mac-hater here

I think that the 23% with the 3rd party code is actually, mostly code for advertising. So if they use Admob for their advertising revenue, it is third party code, and potentially could send data to that third party.
post #92 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaim2 View Post

"Android Phone Fans" have received clarification from the company.


"[Update]: MyLookout chimed in with us to clarify some details that other outlets have been reporting. Specifically, the app does collect data from your phone, but only the devices phone number, subscriber identifier, and voicemail number fields are retrieved. SMS and browsing history are not touched by any of the apps they analyzed throughout their Blackhat conference. Your voicemails password is also not transmitted unless you included the password in your phones voicemail number field.

Were not yet certain on what the developers intentions are for using the pieces of data it does send to China so we cant outright call it malicious but it is collecting and sending data nevertheless. Hopefully that clears up some of the confusion everyones been faced with regarding the read-only property READ_PHONE_STATE that the application uses to access certain pieces of data."


So not as bad as reported, but bad nonetheless.

"We are collecting your Credit Card Info for survey purposes"... or better yet: "We are collecting your Credit Card Info to verify you are an adult".
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I've accomplished my childhood's dream: My job consists mainly of playing with toys all day long.
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post #93 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaim2 View Post

"Android Phone Fans" have received clarification from the company.


"[Update]: MyLookout chimed in with us to clarify some details that other outlets have been reporting. Specifically, the app does collect data from your phone, but only the devices phone number, subscriber identifier, and voicemail number fields are retrieved. SMS and browsing history are not touched by any of the apps they analyzed throughout their Blackhat conference. Your voicemails password is also not transmitted unless you included the password in your phones voicemail number field.

Were not yet certain on what the developers intentions are for using the pieces of data it does send to China so we cant outright call it malicious but it is collecting and sending data nevertheless. Hopefully that clears up some of the confusion everyones been faced with regarding the read-only property READ_PHONE_STATE that the application uses to access certain pieces of data."


So not as bad as reported, but bad nonetheless.



Hey AI... the main article probably needs an update. It looks like Gwydion was right. Feel free to gloat if you must.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

No, this thread proves nothing, mainly because is full of wrong facts. An app with that permission can't read any personal data (SMS's, bookmarks, history, voice mail passwords, etc)
post #94 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacTel View Post

From my encounters, the main reason people jailbreak is to get on T-Mobile and away from AT&T. Then they can tether and do all kinds of things AT&T doesn't like. Get the iPhone on T-Mobile and many will stop jailbreaking as it wouldn't be worth it then.

The main reason that the people I know used to jailbreak their phones was to activate tethering. That's the reason I did as well. Now that AT&T actively supports tethering it's not an issue for me. I bought an iPhone 4 and have no plans to jailbreak it.

That said, it would be very nice indeed if Apple would support turning the iPhone into a wireless access point instead of just the Bluetooth connection. It would be slightly more convenient for me and invaluable when traveling in groups. And yes, I'm aware that the battery draw would go up significantly. That's not a problem on Amtrak which is where I do 99% of my business travel.
post #95 of 211
Symantec and McAfee are lovin' it.
post #96 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post



Hey AI... the main article probably needs an update. It looks like Gwydion was right. Feel free to gloat if you must.

The Apple fanboys don't care about that update. They just want something so they can "show those Android fanboys". Just like when the Android fanboys are unrelenting once an apple issue (accurate or not) starts. This site is entertaining because its like a giant nerd-fest of people defending their products like they were personally attacked--although the Apple nerds seem to think they're less nerdy than the Android nerds
post #97 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2 View Post

So they looked at apps from the market/appstore... I thought those app are 100%... so what are these numbers?!

They probably scanned the binary files (on the iPhone that would require jailbreaking the device) and looked for linkages. Those would tell you what code was being used. If their statistics are trustworthy it means that 1/4 of iPhone apps use third-party libraries and 1/2 of Android apps do. That only means something if there are malware code libraries floating around that people are using.

Quote:
Originally Posted by space2 View Post

This kinda means "Ok, it already happened on iPhone as well"... or am I misunderstanding it?!

So far as anyone is aware there haven't been any actively malevolent applications in the App Store. Some apps in the App Store violated Apple privacy policies, e.g., used your contacts without your knowledge and were pulled.

The points to take away from the story are that Android apps aren't thoroughly "sandboxed". That means the apps on the phone are restricted in terms of what data they can access. On iOS devices apps can't access other apps data and have only limited access to user data. So it wouldn't be possible for an iOS app to access your SIM card unless the app writer found an iOS defect.

The second point is that no one really looks at the apps in the Android market place. Apple actually tries each and every app and rejects those that don't do what they say they do. They also run some automated binary analysis routines looking for red flags. That said, a malware writer could possibly sneak something like this into the App Store. But it wouldn't be able to access the same amount of data that the Android app would and there's a much higher possibility of detection before it gets into the store.
post #98 of 211
Hello all. After reading the three page discussion that's taken place on this site concerning the app that may/may not have been collecting personal data, I felt compelled to create an account and ask a few questions.

Now I understand that this site is about as Apple-biased as you can get, but come on.. do you guys spend all day just looking for things wrong with Android? Is it an insecurity thing or do you really think iOS is the best thing since sliced bread? Your hatred of all things Android is absolutely ridiculous! I mean, it seems like somebody that worked at Google killed your best friend or something. I don't think there could be any more bitterness and hatred here.

Let me get one thing straight- I love Android. I have used both iOS and Android for enough time to decide which I preferred (I had an iPhone for a few months) and made sure not to knock either before I tried them. I'm almost positive none of the commenters here have done that. I'm sure you/your mom/your grandma bought an iPhone, you used it, and decided that nothing in the world can be better, and that's fine- everybody has their own preferences. But good lord, why is it that all Apple fanboys are so closed-minded? As I previously mentioned, I've used both Android and iOS and I can name strong-points and weak-points of each (including hardware).

Examples- I love the design of the iPhone. From the screen to it's overall look and feel- it's very well designed. Better than most Android phones, for sure. The iPhone keyboard is also better than the stock Android keyboard. It's MUCH easier to type on (perhaps because of the spacing of the keys?). I also like the proximity sensor on the iPhone, as my MyTouch 3g doesn't have one. Some apps are also much better on the App Market when compared to what you find on the Marketplace (Chase bank app, Facebook, etc.).

See? Just because I use and love Android doesn't mean I have to spend all day searching for faults in other OS's. Sure, I love that I can sideload apps onto my phone without having to root it, and I actually prefer the Android Marketplace to the App Store (even though there is a higher chance of there being dangerous apps on it). The way I see it, I would rather be able to decide for myself if something is safe than have somebody else decide for me, and that's exactly what Android lets you do when it tells you what information an app has access to. Don't blame Android because people don't pay attention to warnings. If you see a calculator app is going to have access to your passwords, IMEI, stored passwords, and credit card, you probably shouldn't download it.

Anyways, I'm done. If you get nothing else out of what I said, understand this- just because you're a fanboy doesn't mean you have to hate everybody else. Apple and Android need each other, just face it. The competition is great for everybody, right? So just sit back, stop your hating (unless you've actually used Android and can explain in detail WHY you don't care for it), and enjoy your phone.
post #99 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by st3v3 View Post

This site is entertaining because its like a giant nerd-fest of people defending their products like they were personally attacked

Speaking of which: I didn't had any signal loss problems with my Sony-Ericsson X10... nor was Sony-Ericsson even mentioned in the "antennagate" ... so I lived happily ever after ;-)
post #100 of 211
So, a more open platform has disadvantages (not that something like this can't happen with the Apple model), but that doesn't mean a closed platform doesn't also have disadvantages. It is strange how people can't see that while Apple's closed model has some major advantages, like security, that it doesn't mean it is perfect. It is possible for Apple's closed model to remain secure and yet allow more flexibility.

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"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
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post #101 of 211
I don't think it's fair to blame Google for this. People know it's an open marketplace, so it's their responsibility to check out the developer, make sure they're reputable, before installing something. They have to think of their phone as same as a PC in that respect.
post #102 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctwise View Post

They probably scanned the binary files (on the iPhone that would require jailbreaking the device) and looked for linkages. Those would tell you what code was being used. If their statistics are trustworthy it means that 1/4 of iPhone apps use third-party libraries and 1/2 of Android apps do. That only means something if there are malware code libraries floating around that people are using.

But then it means that if a 3rd party app is simply using another 3rd party library (maybe just for decoding a jpeg image), then it's immediately flagged as malicious?!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ctwise View Post

The points to take away from the story are that Android apps aren't thoroughly "sandboxed". That means the apps on the phone are restricted in terms of what data they can access. On iOS devices apps can't access other apps data and have only limited access to user data. So it wouldn't be possible for an iOS app to access your SIM card unless the app writer found an iOS defect.

The second point is that no one really looks at the apps in the Android market place. Apple actually tries each and every app and rejects those that don't do what they say they do. They also run some automated binary analysis routines looking for red flags. That said, a malware writer could possibly sneak something like this into the App Store. But it wouldn't be able to access the same amount of data that the Android app would and there's a much higher possibility of detection before it gets into the store.


Android has a sandboxing model as well: by default an application cannot access another application's data (since each app has it's own user id, and the data folders are protected). To access other apps (or system) data, application needs permissions. To make it user-friendly, the user has to accept all permissions at once, when intsalling. IMHO this is still better compared to the old java era when you were asked every time when an app accessed the internet, and then every time when it tried to read the contacts, etc.

So as I see, the problem is the following:
* Android is more open, more flexible: applications can access a wider range of data. But users (including me of course ;-) ) tend to ignore the permission list, they just accept it.
* iOS is more strict, apps can access only a very limited data, hence iOS is more secure.

Question: is the above correct? Is it really the case that an iOS app cannot access the browser history at all? Even if the app supposed to do that (for example if the app is called BrowserHistorySynchronizer?)

If this is the case, then the problem is a matter of preference: does one prefer to live a bit more dangerously but have more functionality in the phone or not.
post #103 of 211
harmoniousDISCORD

You think this place is bad go to Droidforums.net the Apple Bashing is much worse than the Android discussions I have seen here.

Apple haters have to grab every little detail they can to put down the iPhone.

For me the iPhone works perfectly out of the box.
Both Android and iOS have there benefits.
Since I am moving to Verizon I am looking at the new Droid and learning about how it exist in my environment.

Syncing Outlook with iOS is easy and requires no 3rd party application. From what I have gathered you cant do that with Android out of the box.
I like Motorola as thats all I used before switching to Apple. but they also dont provide functionality in a device they market as an iPhone Killer.

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post #104 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by donarb View Post

Press conference!!! And free bumpers for everybody!!!

Free Anti-App Virus protection thanks to lockline or norton for everybody..
post #105 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rind View Post

Syncing Outlook with iOS is easy and requires no 3rd party application. From what I have gathered you cant do that with Android out of the box.

You can, since Android 2.1
post #106 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesw View Post

well we (iPhone owners) wouldn't know. ask DaHarder

Let your words be sweet and tender. You may have to eat them tomorrow.

Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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Life is too short to drink bad coffee.

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post #107 of 211
It seems someone is already taking advantage of people trying to jailbreak their iPhones. It appears to affect Windows machines. Here is the link regarding the trojan that is disguised as a jail-breaking program.
http://news.softpedia.com/news/iPhon...e-149613.shtml

Beware.
post #108 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by NSXROX View Post

Goodbye Mac vs. PC ads. Hello iPhone vs. Droid ad campaign.

"Hi, I'm an iPhone"
"And I'm a Droid"

"Hey Droid, do you have problems with viruses?"
"Well actually, iPhone, I..." [battery dies]

Rofl
post #109 of 211
harmoniousDISCORD, frankly I think Android fanboys are much worse, speaking from my experience here.
post #110 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpcg View Post

... You have to remember that a lot of parts of Android are closed source and I believe there must be a reason for that. ...

The reason is that they want to claim Android is "open", yet, at the same time, they want to maintain control of Android and not have device manufacturers forking it and creating versions independent of what they want it to be. (Google is nefarious enough without us having to invent even more nefarious scenarios than what they actually do.)

Interestingly, the Chinese have forked Android and replaced the proprietary parts with their own proprietary parts, so that the version of Android that is being implemented their isn't really Android at all, and thus of little or no value to Google.
post #111 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2 View Post

But then it means that if a 3rd party app is simply using another 3rd party library (maybe just for decoding a jpeg image), then it's immediately flagged as malicious?!

Android has a sandboxing model as well: by default an application cannot access another application's data (since each app has it's own user id, and the data folders are protected). To access other apps (or system) data, application needs permissions. To make it user-friendly, the user has to accept all permissions at once, when intsalling. IMHO this is still better compared to the old java era when you were asked every time when an app accessed the internet, and then every time when it tried to read the contacts, etc.

So as I see, the problem is the following:
* Android is more open, more flexible: applications can access a wider range of data. But users (including me of course ;-) ) tend to ignore the permission list, they just accept it.
* iOS is more strict, apps can access only a very limited data, hence iOS is more secure.

Question: is the above correct? Is it really the case that an iOS app cannot access the browser history at all? Even if the app supposed to do that (for example if the app is called BrowserHistorySynchronizer?)

If this is the case, then the problem is a matter of preference: does one prefer to live a bit more dangerously but have more functionality in the phone or not.

Yes you are correct. It seems based on the comments I've read that most people don't understand what sandboxing and 3rd party libraries mean. I can't speak for Android, only as an iOS developer.

3rd party libraries include such things as analytics packages and as you say some help frameworks that make life easier. It's possible that such a lib could have malware embedded in it. However...

Sandboxing: People, this means that apps can't see each others data at all. Two sandboxed apps might as well be running on two different phones. On iOS there is no possibility to "Ask for permission" to enable such acces, it just doesn't exist.

The only possibility for malware would be some sophisticated inter-process messaging or exploiting a hole in the APIs from Apple. Writing such malware would be hard to sneak by Apple's analysis tools.

Everything is possible of course, but it's extremely unlikely that this is going to happen. Especially when there are so many other easier to target options available to hackers.
post #112 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

How do you say that is Mandarin?

Kua da
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post #113 of 211
I think this makes it evidently clear that Apple's more closed and scrutinized app store model is much better than something so wide open.
post #114 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Market_Player View Post

I love the (Walled Garden)

What kind of idiot installs a wallpaper app that warns you it will be accessing your personal information?
post #115 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post

Hmmm... Using fear to justify draconian control and censorship... I wonder if that has ever been used in the past...



No Nazi or Adolph Hitler reference - if you're going to go there - go all the way!!

post #116 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2 View Post

Speaking of which: I didn't had any signal loss problems with my Sony-Ericsson X10... nor was Sony-Ericsson even mentioned in the "antennagate" ... so I lived happily ever after ;-)

I'm pretty much a SE "fanboi", if you will, but I don't find the X10 to be a compelling phone at all. First of all, there are many users reporting poor battery performance, though there are users saying it's great. It's the uncertainty that I don't like. But absolutely WORST of all reasons not to get an X10 is one of the problems with Android itself. The X10 currently ships with Android 1.6. It's not even 2.1. 2.1 for X10 is "expected" in October of this year. Which probably means it'll ship in February 2011. 2.2 isn't even on the map, and there's no indication whatsoever whether 2.2 or greater version will ever be released for the phone.

There are a good number of high-profile Android apps from major developers that REQUIRE 2.0 or greater. As 2.2 becomes more widely available, there will be many apps that require that version, etc. But your X10 cannot run them.

With iOS, we are guaranteed that the iPhone 4 will be upgraded to every version of iOS 5.x. All iPhone 4s (and iPod Touch 4.0 after it's released) will be upgradable to iOS 5.x, to the last of whatever "x" is before iOS 6.0 is released.

Forget Flash. Android 1.6 can't even run HTML5.

It's unbelievable that a phone that ships TODAY runs a version of Android that was obsolete 9 months ago. Not only that... at the time the X10 was released, Android 2.0 was already almost 6 months old. I don't have to worry about that with iOS. My September, 2009 iPod Touch is working fantastic with full support for iOS 4.0, and can run every single iOS app that doesn't require the camera, telephone or GPS.
post #117 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post

I though you wouldn't know.

By the way, with those permissions an app can't read most of the thing the reports says.

Do you think the fanboys here know that they are talking about? No way! The same about editors, especially about Daniel and Prince.

Have anyone of them read about manifest file in android apps and Android security program? Do anyone know that an Android application executes in its own sandbox and have no access to another application data? Do they know that user must look through all permissions he gives the application before it is downloaded?

And I recall about some strange SMS that gives hackers access to user data on iPhone. Is it fixed in iOS 4 ?
American centrism dominates 50% of the population here. That half don't think outside the box ... or perhaps just don't think. © digitalclips
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American centrism dominates 50% of the population here. That half don't think outside the box ... or perhaps just don't think. © digitalclips
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post #118 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I don't think it's fair to blame Google for this. People know it's an open marketplace, so it's their responsibility to check out the developer, make sure they're reputable, before installing something. They have to think of their phone as same as a PC in that respect.

IMO this is the one major difference between the application stores. With Apple you are guaranteed that when you install an application it comes from the developer you think it does (because they are all signed). You have no such guarantee with the Android application store.

Apart from that the stores seem similar. Apple give no guarantee that applications vetted for the store are free from malware. There is a surprising number of people that have this false belief that Apple will somehow protect them from the evils of the world where that is simply not the case.

I'm also surprised that AI haven't put an update on the article. At this point there is nothing to indicate any kind of malicious act and everything to indicate that it was not.

Not to say that something wrong hasn't been done here. Personal information (phone number, carrier id and message bank number) was gathered without user consent, but the tracking of user data is a industry concern with a scope that reaches far beyond one Android application.

I think this was the point of the security conference rather than simply calling out one application.
post #119 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by notafanboy View Post

Until Jobs and his minions start believing that apple owners have enough intelligence to change the batteries in their products, Apple and its fanboys should stop bashing any other product, including Android.

How soon we forget about that "great" antenna design on the eyeFone 4.

Yep, millions of minions. Who don't have to change batteries because *gasp* the batteries don't need to be replaced! And then they don't have phones that blow apart everytime they're dropped because there's no way to build a slim device that has a battery with decent life AND a secure coverplate to keep it in place. Nearly every touch-screen smartphone is an incremental of the benchmark established by the iPhone. Poor guy. Too much time under the bridge, the sunlight hurts the eyes a bit doesn't it - you need to get out more.
post #120 of 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

I don't think it's fair to blame Google for this. People know it's an open marketplace, so it's their responsibility to check out the developer, make sure they're reputable, before installing something. They have to think of their phone as same as a PC in that respect.


Exactly.


Android = Windows of mobile. Insecure, crappy, bloated.
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