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Apple obtains exclusive rights to custom, super-durable metal alloy - Page 4

post #121 of 124
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Originally Posted by Kyle76 View Post

Is this the same substance used to make the T-1000 Terminator?

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Originally Posted by Blastdoor View Post

Or is it adamantium?

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Originally Posted by GQB View Post

No, its Unobtanium.

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Originally Posted by malax View Post

I think this is just an intermediate solution. While adamantium would be a decent choice, I'm holding out for mirthil. Powered by dilithium crystals of course.

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Originally Posted by pcmonahan View Post

Is this Reardon Metal from Hank Reardon ?

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Originally Posted by melgross View Post

Mithral is pretty good, but cuendillar is much better. You can make your part out of anything first, and then turn it into cuendillar afterwards, so it's really easy and inexpensive to make things into it. You do need someone with the One Power to make the change though.

All necessary materials to build an interociter, or make that an iIntercociter.

An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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An iPhone, a Leatherman and thou...  ...life is complete.

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post #122 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukevaxhacker View Post

All this focus by Cnocbui on money must mean he has none...

Of course, many of us have done very well by investing in Apple, Inc., especially at the right times like April 2003 myself (and I have the Schwab Trade Confirmation to prove that... (Yet another company started in 1977)) for under $7 per share.

Good thing I'm under a pseudonym - otherwise I'd have to post a darn disclosure and disclaimer.

Bragging about your wealth is generally considered gauche.
post #123 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by jb510 View Post


Will this quickly or slowly replace all the aluminum or steel components? Can they mill this stuff like aluminum for unibody cases? What is the material cost in comparison to aluminum?

Actually, the cool thing about the alloy is that it can be formed in a similar injection process as plastics making it more versatile for curvy shaped parts.

Cost, from my limited research a few years ago, is much higher than traditional materials such as aluminum, but it is thought that the versatility and strength gained make up for the raw material costs in shorter manufacturing time and less material.

I always thought they would use it for future NASA spaceships, and the like, but I have started suspecting that it deforms at a lower temperature than the materials currently used. Guess there always has to be a trade-off for versatility.
post #124 of 124
Let's understand something here. I've been reading articles that have stated that metals can't be die cast because of the crystalline nature of the metal, and that this will be able to be die cast because it has no crystalline structure. This isn't true.

Metals have been die cast for a long time. "Tin soldiers", actually made of zinc, have been die cast. Metal type is die cast, and has been since the 19th century. Metal camera bodies are die cast. Some of them have such high precision that little machining is needed. Even steel is sometimes die cast. Many things are die cast. It's nothing new. The equivalent in plastic is injection moulding.

It's also expensive because the majority of the alloy is often composed of zirconium, beryllium, or titanium as a main constituent..
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