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Anticipated Apple TV update seen as stepping stone for connected HDTV

post #1 of 101
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Apple is expected to launch a new Apple TV in the coming months with limited storage, a lower price, and its own App Store, paving the way for an Internet-connected HDTV as soon as 2012.

Analyst Gene Munster with Piper Jaffray on Monday issued a note to investors in which he reiterated his belief that Apple plans to launch a connected, full-fledged HDTV in the next 2 to 4 years. He acknowledged recent rumors that the existing Apple TV set top box will be renamed iTV, but said that the anticipated product update will only be a stepping stone to the eventual flat panel living room TV.

A key component for the Apple television set, Munster believes, will be Apple's soon-to-launch data center in North Carolina. He believes the massive location could serve as a hub for a cloud-based iTunes service that would allow users to stream their catalog of movies and TV shows.

Munster believes the upcoming Apple TV update will add an App Store, allowing users to download applications to run on the device. He also sees the product having a lower price and less internal storage, as more content is streamed without a need to save it on the device.

The new Apple TV would be an attempt by Apple to fight the set top box model that currently exists in America. In June, Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs explained that the Apple TV remains a hobby because it's hard to break in to a market where consumers are used to receiving a cable box for free or for $10 per month.

"The only way that's ever going to change," Jobs said, "is if you can really go back to square one, tear up the set top box, redesign it from scratch with a consistent UI across all these different functions, and get it to consumers in a way that they're willing to pay for it. And right now there's no way to do that."



But a new cloud-centric Apple TV is rumored to cost just $99, potentially making the device a much more attractive option for consumers.

When Apple can overcome the "primary" hurdles of set top boxes and live TV, Munster believes that is when the company will strike with an Internet-based iTunes TV pass for $50 to $90 per month. An App Store could also offer games, and services like Netflix and Hulu Plus, built right into the set.

As he has said before, Munster believes Apple could push into the hDTV market in the next 2 to 4 years, and could "move the needle" in a market that as of January of 2010 was worth more than $30 billion.

"Apple's ability to deliver hardware, software and content that could replace an entire entertainment system with a single TV, puts Apple in a unique position for the emerging connected TV cycle," he wrote. "Apple already has several of the key ingredients for success in the connected TV market, many of which would differentiate Apple from current market players."
post #2 of 101
Tooting my own horn without shame:

http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...45#post1481645
http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...65#post1643765
http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...77#post1510877
http://forums.appleinsider.com/showt...89#post1439789

Snappy!

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post #3 of 101
I just can't see it happening - content producers are going to play hard ball and make life as difficult as possible for Apple, which in turn will make Apple look bad as the TV will have very limited content. Secondly, the whole world has just upgraded to flat panel hi def TV's, the price of which are now very low (you can get a very decent samsung tv in the UK for around £400 - £500), most people aren't ready to make that investment again within a year or two - it's the same reason OLED TV remains so expensive (not enough sales to lower the price) and 3D TV doesn't have a chance in hell in the mainstream (no 3D content out there, so why pay 1000s more for the potential?)

The average consumer is being drowned in a barrage of new technology, and most have now bought their family TV which I'd imagine for most families would see them through at least three or four years.

Apple need to focus on a box capable of delivering 1080 hi-def content, with full tvr capabilities and tv tuner, along side all the strengths/functionality of the iOS with app store, games and face time (a return of the external iSight camera to fix on your telly for video chat in the living room). It would also need a Blu-Ray player for most normal consumers to consider the purchase. If they deliver this, then people will be a little more forgiving as more content comes online over time. It would also need blue-tooth support for keyboard and other input device. Wireless, simple streaming of content from computers/laptops/iPads in the household would be an additional killer feature.

A box which offers only limited content from limited content providers will remain a hobby. A single set top box that replaces all others and introduces new functionality would revolutionise the home media set up.
post #4 of 101
If anyone in their right mind thinks an Apple TV, integrated into a TV or not, could possibly replace that big stack of stuff in the Piper illustration, they're massively deluded.

How will an ATV replace an audio receiver for example? Will it amplify Dolby True HD and DTS Master and have a big row of 7.1 speaker terminals? Somehow, I suspect not.

Will an ATV replace an Xbox 360 or a PS3? I'm sure it will play casual games and the like, but will an ATV be hosting the latest Halo, GTA, God of War, or Gran Turismo anytime soon? Again, I suspect not. Gaming in particular requires absolutely massive investment and commitment on all fronts which Apple have never shown the slightest bit of interest in. That the iPhone has proved popular for small scale gaming happened by accident, and it's an epic leap to take that up to the level Microsoft, Sony, and even Nintendo operate on.

And then there's the issue of replacing the humble DVR/Cable set-top box. Obviously this will depend on content and pricing, which Apple are currently miles behind on. I realise things are a little better in the US, but here in the UK the iTunes store is barren, grotesquely over priced, and usually not in even 720p, let alone 1080i or 1080p. Even if Apple was committed on this front would the providers play ball? What's in it for them to lessen the appeal of their own TV channels and platforms by offering everything a la carte to Apple?

Jobs was right when he said there was no way to break into this market.
post #5 of 101
It's been more than two years I have HDTV via internet and I pay CHF 30 which is US $ 28.91.

As usual, the Americans are way behind on technology so in order to catch up with others they come with Apple TV and a service that's only available in America, not even Canada... like Hulu etc. Hulu is gay anyway...

The reason? Some sort of stupid and primitive TV law that forbids you from broadcasting the most interesting TV shows internationally, then they wonder why there is so much piracy... Yeah, well guess what, with a little bit of online research people will figure out how to download an HD episode for free in a matter of minutes and put it on their HD streaming devices and watch them on their HDTVs... So if you ever wonder why there is so much piracy, it's because of some unreasonable people who are only interested in coming up with pointless laws restricting and complicating entertainment.
post #6 of 101
Ahw... all this consumer stuff... how I long for the days when it was Apple Computer...
post #7 of 101
Unless it turns into a set top box with actual tv I can't see this working. I already have a set top box that streams BBC iplayer content for free. Why would I want to pay to see stuff from iTunes.

The only reason I've ever thought of wanting an apple tv is the choice of renting films, but at it's current price it just works out cheaper to buy the films on DVD.
post #8 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

Apple need to focus on a box capable of delivering 1080 hi-def content, with full tvr capabilities and tv tuner,.


Naw, we already have all that stuff. What is most needed is a better way to buy content from Steve. Apple TV works OK, because you can buy movies and stuff. But I want to buy apps too. And instead of recording series on my horrible DVR, I will be able to simply buy a subscription from Apple.
post #9 of 101
I don't think the connected tv fits apple's business model. People are much more likely to upgrade their apple tv box if its $99, but a $1999 TV will likely not be replaced for a decade.
post #10 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by SendMe View Post

Naw, we already have all that stuff. What is most needed is a better way to buy content from Steve. Apple TV works OK, because you can buy movies and stuff. But I want to buy apps too. And instead of recording series on my horrible DVR, I will be able to simply buy a subscription from Apple.

What you'd need in that case is for apple to have deals worldwide with every broadcaster/producer - it'll never happen and the device would be derided for having a lack of content. It needs to replace, or it has no place.
post #11 of 101
It's still one sexy looking TV
post #12 of 101
I can't see Apple bothering to compete in the low margin screen business. Sure there would be a small market who would love the brushed aluminum case with the Apple logo, but for most people the TV disappears - it's what's on it that matters.

The box on the other hand, that has huge potential and I'd buy in a second. It needs the Magic Trackpad if it's going to use iOS, and it needs a great consolidating interface for streaming content.

Check out PlayOn.TV for a preview. It does an awesome job of collecting all the Hulus, NetFlixes, Comedy Central, et al, and presenting it in an easy to use interface that can be delivered just about anywhere you want. It's not the screen that is holding things back.

If Apple thinks they can make a go of $5 movie rentals and $3 episodes from iTunes they will fail. If they embrace the iOS ecosystem and internet TV it could be huge.
post #13 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by waveghel View Post

Ahw... all this consumer stuff... how I long for the days when it was Apple Computer...

If the "consumer stuff" helps Apple to keep developing the Mac good. Remember when people were predicting Apple's demise? Starting with the iPod and then the iPhone, Apple survived and is stronger than ever.
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post #14 of 101
If Apple ever did make a TV set, it would cost twice as much as anyone else's, have a mirror like glossy screen to better see yourself, and would only work on Apple's electricity.

Steve O pretty much dismissed the future of the Apple TV on that D? interview so why are we to believe there is one forthcoming? He said the business model had no where to go as quoted in the article. Besides, you all hate Pied Piper and his predictions.

Forget the stupid TV Apple and fix the stuff you already have out. Apple has serious problems executing lately and if I were Steve Mobs I would pay attention to that. The company has a huge black eye over the iPhone 4 and their brand name is in jeopardy.

Straighten up and stop making stupid decisions.
post #15 of 101
Am so waiting for this. Currently got an old desktop hooked up to the TV, and honestly that is the only TV I watch. I still have cable for the rest of the family and for sports, but other then that I just use Clickr to find what I need and watch it.

The only problem with TV that I can see is that it will be limited to whatever I can get on iTunes. Currently I can browse the net as a whole internet (not just apps or itunes) and can play flash and all, something I don't see TV doing.
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post #16 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbruc View Post

I don't think the connected tv fits apple's business model. People are much more likely to upgrade their apple tv box if its $99, but a $1999 TV will likely not be replaced for a decade.

If a modern TV lasts 5 years, the owners should consider themselves lucky. Once Apple makes TVs, then they will last a decade.
post #17 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonbruc View Post

I don't think the connected tv fits apple's business model. People are much more likely to upgrade their apple tv box if its $99, but a $1999 TV will likely not be replaced for a decade.

The Apple Stores are also not currently set up to handle large items. Nobody's going to lug a 60" TV around a mall, and Apple would have tough competition against Best Buy etc. that offer delivery and in-home setup.

Apple should stay with the box, and focus on getting it right.
post #18 of 101
NKHM hit the nail on the head - people already get HD TV for free, and can record it for free too. DVDs are cheap as chips to buy, so why rent them? Just to pay Apple more money? I can see how that prospect is attractive to Apple, but the Apple TV has not sold in numbers because it is not attractive to the consumer with all its restrictions.

Under my TV I have a digital set top box with 320 Gb hard disk recorder; and a combined DVD/VHS Video recorder/player. They take up a lot of space, but all the functionality is already there. It would be nice to have a BluRay player too, and if it could record the HD video I make of my family direct from my computer that would be fantastic.

What would sell is a device that combines everything into one: interface with the computer, interface with incoming TV, ability to play and record to disk based media, set top box and streaming music/radio with Dolby surround sound all built in. Renting the odd video may be a subsidiary bonus, but it's not a reason to buy on its own.

Anything less than a complete package and people will just stay with what they already have.

To say that "that's not Apple's business model" is risible. Consumers don't care what a manufacturer's interests are, they focus on their own. That is something Apple used to appear to understand, but these days I wonder sometimes. I really do.
post #19 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

What you'd need in that case is for apple to have deals worldwide with every broadcaster/producer - it'll never happen and the device would be derided for having a lack of content. It needs to replace, or it has no place.

Sorry to break your heart but the TV will be primarily beneficial to the US for some time but at least you have Spotify.

Whether the content owners & cable companies like it or not TV is moving to the net. The best they could do is slow it down. With a Netflix, ABC and Hulu Plus apps one can get by with no cable box.
post #20 of 101
I dont see any real analysis going on in this article. It only is taking a stab in the dark with nothing to back up any of these ridiculous claims. I see no justification to claim that Apple will release a $2000 TV. What does PJ see that Apple doing to justify this claim? Who in their right mind would pay 90 dollars a month to stream iTunes? Im sure some would, I wouldnt. If they had all the content available on cable, then I would consider the 50 price target, but I somehow think that Apple will never get enough streaming on demand content to justify this.
At a 99 dollar price point I would buy iTV but only if it had a Netflix App on it. This would be about the same price as a Roku box but much more versitile and I already have on demand streaming with my Netflix subscription. As I have stated in other posts, Apple's biggest competition is Netflix and it is very odd that they had the CEO of Netflix on stage for the iPhone Release.

@Swissmac- Yes people get OVER THE AIR HDTV for free, but still pay for cable. In my area, HD cable costs about $80 per month, which is why I dont have it, but my rabbit ears on my Flatscreen works just fine for free ota programs. Im not sure where you get your DVD's but they seem to be stuck in the 14-22 dollar range for recent, quality movies. Sure I can buy "Youve got mail" for 8 dollars, but why would buy when I can rent for half the price. Not like Im going to watch that movie over and over.
post #21 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by waveghel View Post

Ahw... all this consumer stuff... how I long for the days when it was Apple Computer...

do you find their Mac offerings to be lacking nowadays? What effect has iPhones/iPads/etc had on their Mac products?
post #22 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

I just can't see it happening - content producers are going to play hard ball and make life as difficult as possible for Apple, which in turn will make Apple look bad as the TV will have very limited content. Secondly, the whole world has just upgraded to flat panel hi def TV's, the price of which are now very low (you can get a very decent samsung tv in the UK for around £400 - £500), most people aren't ready to make that investment again within a year or two - it's the same reason OLED TV remains so expensive (not enough sales to lower the price) and 3D TV doesn't have a chance in hell in the mainstream (no 3D content out there, so why pay 1000s more for the potential?)

The average consumer is being drowned in a barrage of new technology, and most have now bought their family TV which I'd imagine for most families would see them through at least three or four years.

Apple need to focus on a box capable of delivering 1080 hi-def content, with full tvr capabilities and tv tuner, along side all the strengths/functionality of the iOS with app store, games and face time (a return of the external iSight camera to fix on your telly for video chat in the living room). It would also need a Blu-Ray player for most normal consumers to consider the purchase. If they deliver this, then people will be a little more forgiving as more content comes online over time. It would also need blue-tooth support for keyboard and other input device. Wireless, simple streaming of content from computers/laptops/iPads in the household would be an additional killer feature.

A box which offers only limited content from limited content providers will remain a hobby. A single set top box that replaces all others and introduces new functionality would revolutionise the home media set up.

I think that Apple might diverge from the normal iTunes model with this. If they are having trouble negotiating deals, let others do it for them. If they make an AppStore model, they can make a multi-source system for content. You could get your content from netflix, directly from networks, or from a cable provider over TCP/IP connect to your cable box. They will probably continue to offer iTunes shows and videos as an additional option (Kinda like the government health insurance option). If done right, this could both enhance existing cable offerings and add more options to this market.
post #23 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

I just can't see it happening - content producers are going to play hard ball and make life as difficult as possible for Apple, which in turn will make Apple look bad as the TV will have very limited content.

I mostly agree. Apple is going to have to bring ubiquity of content and live sports, news, and special events, or it's just a repackaged version of the content offering they already have for Apple TV.

Quote:
Secondly, the whole world has just upgraded to flat panel hi def TV's, the price of which are now very low (you can get a very decent samsung tv in the UK for around £400 - £500), most people aren't ready to make that investment again within a year or two - it's the same reason OLED TV remains so expensive (not enough sales to lower the price) and 3D TV doesn't have a chance in hell in the mainstream (no 3D content out there, so why pay 1000s more for the potential?)

The average consumer is being drowned in a barrage of new technology, and most have now bought their family TV which I'd imagine for most families would see them through at least three or four years.

I don't think that's very persuasive. The flat panel market is still growing, and innovation always drives replacement sales. Apple doesn't compete in commodotized markets; if they can't offer something that innovates, they won't get into that market.

Quote:
Apple need to focus on a box capable of delivering 1080 hi-def content, with full tvr capabilities and tv tuner, along side all the strengths/functionality of the iOS with app store, games and face time (a return of the external iSight camera to fix on your telly for video chat in the living room). It would also need a Blu-Ray player for most normal consumers to consider the purchase. If they deliver this, then people will be a little more forgiving as more content comes online over time. It would also need blue-tooth support for keyboard and other input device. Wireless, simple streaming of content from computers/laptops/iPads in the household would be an additional killer feature.

A box which offers only limited content from limited content providers will remain a hobby. A single set top box that replaces all others and introduces new functionality would revolutionise the home media set up.

1080p: Netflix Watch Instantly isn't 1080p, and most of the content looks as good as the Comcast HD channels that I get. I'm not sure that's a huge priority.

FaceTime: Definitely. Apps: Definitely. Games: Definitely.

DVR/TV tuner: Maybe. I think Apple would market an iTV as a cable killer, so it's hard to say if they would include cable/satellite capability or market the product as a hard break from that payment model.

Blu-ray: Same. I could see Apple moving past Blu-ray as a relic of days when you needed a physical disc to watch a movie. Skipping Blu-ray would also help with the price point.
post #24 of 101
In that price comparison, the apple HDTV comes out looking terrible. Not to mention that many people are still going to want to watch optical disks, and unless they are somehow streamed from iTunes, people will want cable for sporting events and other real time shows (not to mention just watching TV when it's actually on - releasing shows immediately after air if not during would be a huge improvement over next day).

Netflix, hulu, and other third party streaming offerings would be a huge upgrade to aTV, I'd even consider one at that point, but I'm skeptical apple will allow things other than iTunes.

I think apple could be huge in the tv/set top box business but I see them shooting themselves in the foot by not allowing things other than iTunes.
post #25 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleStud View Post

do you find their Mac offerings to be lacking nowadays? What effect has iPhones/iPads/etc had on their Mac products?

Mention iMac or Snow Leopard or Apple TV to the average Joe and they have no idea what you mean. Like it our not, outside of the Apple community, most people know of Apple as "that company that makes iPods and iPhones." This is true in America and especially other countries.

Whether they deserve it or not, the iPhone 4 has given Apple a black eye and it has hurt their brand name. If anyone was thinking of delving deeper into the Apple ecosystem, they would think twice after dropping calls all over the place.

For this reason, I too mourn the loss of the former Apple Computer company. They have morphed in to a company that cares about consumer devices for idiot teenagers who have nothing to do all day but walking across the street texting while B Bopping to the latest Lady Gaga symphony.
post #26 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

Whether they deserve it or not, the iPhone 4 has given Apple a black eye and it has hurt their brand name.

Just like the sticking gas pedal and Toyota? Doing business in the US is apparently a high-risk operation as you can get hit by a shitstorm at any moment.
post #27 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post

...I think apple could be huge in the tv/set top box business but I see them shooting themselves in the foot by not allowing things other than iTunes.

Well then what would you need iTunes for if your future AppleTV or iTV or whatever were as open and as compatible as a WDTV Live or similar? Apple's model relies on the sale or rental of content and an open AppleTV device would definitely hurt that revenue stream.
post #28 of 101
Maybe at $1599 I'll bite into an Apple HDTV with AppleTV built-in, but not at $1999.

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post #29 of 101
I have a solution for this already... I am getting the new MacMini hooked up to my 55" Samsung and a PS3 for Blu-Ray. The internet comes via a DSL, but I am about to switch to fiberoptic that offers 10, 30, 50 MB plans and symmetrical. Once I got that, I can even ditch the cable rip-off plan after I connect a digital antenna in the attic for local broadcast channels.

This way, I can watch 1080P BluRay movies, and some HD streamed content from Netflix, Hulu, You Tube, and over the air HDTV. The cable channels are just too full of garbage and makes no sense to have them. Even financial news can be seen via Bloomberg TV. Got to spend some $moolah and this is not for everybody. I can save $100+/mo in cable subscription per month so the MacMini has quick pay-off, plus I can surf the internet.

I hope Apple does well with iTV, but I do not see where they will fit in the market place. Content is the key and so far they have a hard time getting content. Plus makes no sense cutting the capability and go with 720P. So far it sounds like a MacMini Lite... kind like the PC Jr with the chicklet keyboard, if anybody is old enough to remember that fiasco.
post #30 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

If Apple ever did make a TV set, it would cost twice as much as anyone else's, have a mirror like glossy screen to better see yourself, and would only work on Apple's electricity.

Steve O pretty much dismissed the future of the Apple TV on that D? interview so why are we to believe there is one forthcoming? He said the business model had no where to go as quoted in the article. Besides, you all hate Pied Piper and his predictions.

Forget the stupid TV Apple and fix the stuff you already have out. Apple has serious problems executing lately and if I were Steve Mobs I would pay attention to that. The company has a huge black eye over the iPhone 4 and their brand name is in jeopardy.

Straighten up and stop making stupid decisions.

If you weren't being such a jerk in just about every post of yours, I'd actually agree with you.
post #31 of 101
I hate this HDTV rumour with a passion. We're talking about a company that goes out of its way to have a limited number of devices. You simply can't do that with the TV market as there are way to many reasons. Then there is the lack of profits from these low PPI monitors. Since none of the rumours specify panel type, size, etc. I have to think it's just a poorly thought out wish.

What I can see are possible AppleTV types: 1) One built into the new Mac Mini case with a HDD for local storage designed for your main big screen TV. 2) A cheap, simple device for streaming that one could feasibly put on all the other TVs in the house. 3) A device that "connects" to the back of any and all TVs that wish to participate by way of a universal plug and clamps.
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post #32 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

If you weren't being such a jerk in just about every post of yours, I'd actually agree with you.

The truth is the truth. What difference does it make how I convey it? I've made no secret of the fact that this forum frustrates me in it's inability to criticize Apple. There is a difference between liking their products and worshipping at the alter of Jobs. If everyone else would keep it in perspective, I wouldn't get my iP4 antenna in such a knot.

I will take your post as a personal victory for the logical point of view.
post #33 of 101
I think going with a physical TV makes very little sense to Apple - the actual value they can add to the TV outside of the AppleTV functionality itself, is very minimal. All the functionality mentioned in this article is already possible with a reinvented Apple TV.

I think the way Apple will go ahead will be the following:
- Move Apple TV to iOS, opening up AppStore.
- Cloud based DVR with limited local DVR.
- Built in Video tuner capability to hook up other devices
- Sell cheap iPod Touch as a iControl remote control unit, including IR Transceiver, WiFi, etc.
- Sell motorized iSight camera to be mounted on top of TV - with pan, zoom functions. These functions should be controllable from iControl as well.
- Integrate DVR functionality with MobileMe - so that we can enable and change recordings from anywhere in the planet.
- Integrated SlingBox functionality for place shifting - using Mobile Me - any content available from Cloud will be streamed from Cloud

Have blogged in great detail about this at:
http://prastalk.blogspot.com/2010/05...einvented.html
post #34 of 101
As Jobs stated before, the real barrier facing Apple are the telco/cable monopolies that control the pipes that feed the content from the producers... Very few of us don't rely on the same company providing both our internet connection and our television content. No Apple-branded, Google-branded, or Microsoft-branded solution will topple that. Sure there will a limited number of partnerships formed, but in general the monopolies are real smart ensuring they stay a monopoly.

What I find interesting, is that Apple/Google/Microsoft had a chance a couple of years ago to buy some pipes when the FCC was auctioning off that wireless spectrum that could be used to build for a nation-wide wireless broadband infrastructure. It seemed like that sprectrum could be used to unseat the telcos (or at least provide some much needed competition). None of the three seem to make a serious bid for it. If Jobs and company had a chance to own some pipes but chose not, its logical to think that the ROI just isn't there in trying to unseat the telcos.

The AppleTV or iTV should be a simple way to stream your content residing on your home computer to your televison... It should be cheap and just work. Not sure what an app store would provide? High quality apps (i.e., games) would need good hardware and turn the iTV into a gaming console, which in turn affects the price... The idea of a Netflix streaming app residing on my iTV doesn't sound like the direction Apple will take.
post #35 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

If you weren't being such a jerk in just about every post of yours, I'd actually agree with you.

I wholeheartedly disagree with his conclusion that Jobs dismissed media extender appliances at All Things D. I say he confirmed a new one was coming.

Apple launches the device into the media extenders market before it was mature or focused. This has worked for out great for the iPad but we've seen stand alone media extenders evolve to best Apple in many ways and PVRs and game consols add features that mimic what Apple had done a couple years earlier. Two mistakes they made were setting it up against the original iPhone and depending on contracts from content owners to help sell the device before they inked the deals. I'm sure that mini-demo back in 2006 was to help push the content owners into seeing a secure connected option for their content, not for us. The demo for us came months later at MWSF 2007.
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post #36 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by macarena View Post

I think going with a physical TV makes very little sense to Apple - the actual value they can add to the TV outside of the AppleTV functionality itself, is very minimal. All the functionality mentioned in this article is already possible with a reinvented Apple TV.

I think the way Apple will go ahead will be the following:
- Move Apple TV to iOS, opening up AppStore.

Explain please why anyone would want iOS to escape from the iPhone or iPod or iPad? It's a watered down crippled version of OSX. And it's a walled garden, why in the world would we want another device to have it?

I am waiting to pull the lever on a new Apple TV but if they flipped to iOS, I would try to grab an older one from Amazon. I want flash videos, I want free HULU, I want the full YouTube that lets me watch classic TV shows. I want the real internet, with a firefox option because Safari doesn't work with every website.

Besides, no one has said if the new version would allow you to stream content from your real Mac to your TV. I like that feature for looking at Photos on the TV set.


Too bad a FIOS DVR only lets you do that with a PC.
post #37 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I wholeheartedly disagree with his conclusion that Jobs dismissed media extender appliances at All Things D. I say he confirmed a new one was coming.

Amazing how two people can listen to the same words and reach such different conclusions. I guess this is how Barrack got elected.
post #38 of 101
I just sold my 3 year old AppleTV for $100 yesterday (which I loved!) I cancelled my cable ($60/mo is too much) and am thinking about selling my 46" HDTV, DVD player and my 20" intel iMac and replacing both with a 27" iMac...put it in my living room the odd time I want watch a red box DVD...connect my eyeTV and record a local channel the odd time I want to watch a local channel and skip the commercials.

And just have my silver Apple remote instead of the craptastic remotes from the TV/DVD/Cable companies!

Instead of watching TV...I've decided to start training for a Triathlon!

Best!
post #39 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

The truth is the truth. What difference does it make how I convey it? I've made no secret of the fact that this forum frustrates me in it's inability to criticize Apple. There is a difference between liking their products and worshipping at the alter of Jobs. If everyone else would keep it in perspective, I wouldn't get my iP4 antenna in such a knot.

I will take your post as a personal victory for the logical point of view.

Perhaps you need to read more carefully. Most people hear have positive AND negative things to say about Apple and Jobs. Your rhetoric doesn't change that, but it does weaken any point you may have.

If you want to talk about reading into things to see only worship note that you made a comment that infers that because Steve said so it must be true. Sounds to me like you think his word is canon.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
Reply
post #40 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

Whether they deserve it or not, the iPhone 4 has given Apple a black eye and it has hurt their brand name. If anyone was thinking of delving deeper into the Apple ecosystem, they would think twice after dropping calls all over the place.

NO, it hasn't. Apple dealt with it very well, by keeping quiet, then making a one off statement - "it's BS, now shut up about it". That was enough for Jo Ordinary, that plus that fact that only a very small percentage of people exhibit the antenna or proximity sensor issue. The devices are still sold out, Apple share price is fine and it's still a must have item. Apple couldn't sell any more than they are doing and production barely seems to be keeping up.

You see your friend has an iPhone - how is it? Amazing? Any Problems? No.

That undoes all of the unfounded media hysteria. People are over this now. It's why the new android phone with similar issue won't be a big story.
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