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Millennial: Apple's iPhone displays 55% of smartphone ads

post #1 of 42
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Millennial Media, the largest independent mobile adverting network, has released figures for July showing Apple leads mobile devices in general with its iOS platform and smartphones in particular with iPhone.

Millennial Medias Mobile Mix report for July 2010 says Apple remains the leading device manufacturer on its ad network, with 35 percent share of all ad impressions.

Samsung is in second place with 17 percent, RIM in third with 10 percent, while Motorola and HTC round out the top five with 9 and 7 percent shares, respectively.

Excluding non-phone devices, Apple's iPhone ranks first among the top 20 mobile phones with 24 percent share, followed by RIM's BlackBerry Curve with 6.7 percent, Motorola's Droid with just under 5 percent, and two Samsung models filling out the top five.

Smartphones in the mobile device pie

Twelve of the top 20 mobile phones are smartphones; six are Android devices, four are BlackBerry. OF all the mobile devices Millennial handles, 32 percent are simple feature phones while 19 percent are "connected devices," which include video games such as the Sony PSP and Nintendo DS, and web enabled devices like iPod touch. The other 49 percent are smartphones.

Looking only at smartphones (which are defined as running a recognizable operating system, excluding some higher end feature phones using a proprietary operating system such as the Samsung Instinct and LG Vu), Apple commands 55 percent of the pie, while Android smartphones delivered 19 percent, RIM had a 16 percent share, Windows Mobile took 4 percent, and every other platform added up to 6 percent.



Developers, developers, developers

Among developers targeting multiple platforms on its ad network, Millennial reports that 100 percent support Apple's iOS, while 75 percent target Android, 46 percent support RIM's BlackBerry OS, 29 percent write for Symbian, 21 percent use Java, and 17 percent support other platforms, including Java, Symbian, Windows Mobile, and BREW.

The top mobile category for mobile software continues to be games, which represented 47 percent of the app revenue from Millennial's network. Social networking apps remain in second place. Music apps jumped up from sixth in June to third place in July, while weather and news apps filled out the top five most popular categories of apps.

Most of Millennial's data reflects the US market, but globally, the company said July ad requests on Android have grown 47 percent over June, and 690 percent since January. Apple's iOS ad requests increased 24 percent in July, and 15 percent since January. iPad requests grew by 327 percent in the month of July. RIM's ad requests grew by 18 percent over June, and 66 percent since January.

Largest of the indies

Millennial Media became the largest independent mobile adverting network after Google acquired AdMob and Apple bought up second place Quattro Wireless last fall. Apple has since converted Quattro into iAd, which is also now exclusive to the iOS platform.

RIM has reportedly expressed interest in buying Millennial to joint Apple and Google in the ad arms race but balked at the price, leaving Millennial to report an intent to remain independent.

Apple's iOS SDK insists that developers not include code from competing ad networks that collect private data from users for any purpose other than to serve relevant ads, and technically bars advertisers linked to competing platforms from harvesting private data from iOS users at all, although it does not appear to be enforcing this rule.

As AdMob shifted from an independent to a subsidiary of Google, the company's analytics began to reflect a bias toward promoting Android as a platform. Apple never released any public analytical data through Quattro after acquiring it, and now that iAd is Apple's preferred ad network for iOS, data from other ad networks (whether affiliated with another platform vendor or independent) will increasingly lack access to the full scope of what is occurring in mobile ads due to Apple's legendary secrecy.
post #2 of 42
Not surprising at all--is it?
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post #3 of 42
Apple don't actually think this kind of publicity is good do they? Newsflash: people don't like ads much and if they hear that a particular phone has the most ads that is not a positive for the product. Whatever happened to Apple's idea that you can't go wrong if you focus on the end user?
post #4 of 42
As a developer I find statements like this frustrating. Unless you are willing to pay for all your apps, how else do you expect developers to make a living? They have to monetize their apps either by selling them or by using display ads.
post #5 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Apple don't actually think this kind of publicity is good do they? Newsflash: people don't like ads much and if they hear that a particular phone has the most ads that is not a positive for the product. Whatever happened to Apple's idea that you can't go wrong if you focus on the end user?

If ads can bring you better free apps, the end user wins, especially if they are allowed to pay for the option of ad-free versions.

Moreover, if the ads can be an attraction, granted maybe not to all, then what's in iAds to dislike?

If people are voluntarily clicking and re-clicking on those ads, isn't that a good thing?

How far are we from having the Best iAds of the Year event? People in love with ads?

Happens on TV.
post #6 of 42
I'd rather it displayed 0% of smartphone ads...
post #7 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by ascii View Post

Apple don't actually think this kind of publicity is good do they? Newsflash: people don't like ads much and if they hear that a particular phone has the most ads that is not a positive for the product. Whatever happened to Apple's idea that you can't go wrong if you focus on the end user?

I never purport to speak for "people" or the "end user", regardless of what the perceived popular view of anything is. I always assess a thing on its merits, not on people's popular perception of it.

Accordingly, when I see an unobtrusive advert header at the bottom or top of a desktop or mobile screen, my first inclination is not to get rid of it - I read it first, then decide what to do, whether to read further or dispose of it.

This way I've actually found stuff I've been looking for and have had little luck with using search engines (Newsflash: advertisers use trending to serve you ads that might interest you, based on your prior preferences, location etc).

I personally think that the "two legs bad, four legs good" knee-jerk attitude against advertising is infantile and self-defeating. It's a clever way to offset 3rd party development costs, and keep everyone happy.

As (mobile) hardware becomes more and more of a commodity, its price will continue to plummet (we've seen this happen in the PC/Desktop market already), and ads will increasingly become the way to add value to units. In anticipation of this future scenario, Apple has accepted this reality and taken steps to invest in it on behalf of its shareholders, its developers AND its end-users. The acquisition of Quattro and its conversion to iAds is not a mere "hobbyist" venture.
post #8 of 42
Add me to the list of people saying that being able to claim to be the most ad-laden platform is a definite bad thing from a consumers' standpoint. "We have the most ads" is not a positive by any marker. These are the kinds of things competitors can and should use in their campaigns.
post #9 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by FineTunes View Post

Not surprising at all--is it?

Really? iAd has just started. I would be surprised if it's second, let alone first.
post #10 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Not sure why people look at this as good news. Guess what people don't like ads.

They must don't like Google immensely then.
post #11 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post

They must don't like Google immensely then.

I can block Google's ads. Is there an ad blocker for in-app ads on the iPhone?
post #12 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

I can block Google's ads. Is there an ad blocker for in-app ads on the iPhone?

Yes. You buy the paid version of the app. Problem solved.
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post #13 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Add me to the list of people saying that being able to claim to be the most ad-laden platform is a definite bad thing from a consumers' standpoint. "We have the most ads" is not a positive by any marker. These are the kinds of things competitors can and should use in their campaigns.

The pitch would actually be "our ads don't intrude."

Or, "....our ads don'd f### up your web experience."
post #14 of 42
Only 55%? Most free apps that I use, use AdMob, or Adsense. Canada doesn't get iAds yet so I can't count that in.

Lopsided infomation I guess .
post #15 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

Yes. You buy the paid version of the app. Problem solved.

And if there's only an ad-supported version of the app?

Problem still solved? No?

Knee-jerk much?
post #16 of 42
If apple can attract respectable advertisers, this isn't a bad thing. It will help ensure that developers are writing new apps and encourage printed publications to work with apple on the e-book versions of their magazines.
post #17 of 42
Does anyone really care?
post #18 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopper View Post

And if there's only an ad-supported version of the app?

Problem still solved? No?

Yes. You don't use the app if the ads offend you. Problem STILL solved.

Developers don't OWE you apps. They choose to provide apps on the basis of being reimbursed - either by you purchasing the app or by ad revenue. If neither of those is acceptable to you, then don't use the app. You're always free to write your own.

Who ever told you that everything in life was free?
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post #19 of 42
I suppose the folks who dislike ads on their phone so much don't ever listen to commercial radio, or television, or have a phone book in their house or drive bas billboard (and other outdoor advertising such as on the side of a bus). What would television look like and how many channels would thre be if EVERY program was pay-per-view?

and what of the folks who work at the companies advertising those products?

I would speculate that some of the very same folks you are lambasting advertisements and even complain about geeze how many times do I need to see an ad for a Ford truck are the same ones who complain that not enough people "buy american"

As much as I dislike ads - especially the ones on TV that partly obscure the picture or sound of the program I am watching - more for the idea that I can be swayed by advertising - it is a fact of life in a free-market capitalistic society. If you don't like it - change the channel.

Though it is interesting that the iPod function in iPods and other iOS devices - allows you to watch or listen to content for days on end without ads - but when you use other areas of the device you are subject to ads. Of course in the case of music, you have (allegedly) paid for the content and just like pay-per-view TV you would not expect commercials. But here again - if you want to pay for the content on your iOS devices then you do not have to see ads.

Perhaps the way to publicize this message would be to list the number of apps downloaded for free thanks to iAds. Such as iAds has allowed users to download 10,000,000 free Apps for the iOS platform while generating $ (fill in a number here) in revenue for the developers.

I am amazed at the variety and quality of content available for free - and the ads are really not very intrusive - if they took over the entire screen or required multiple steps to dismiss or were obnoxious in any way then I might feel differently. of course on the other hand - since the ad model doesn't necessarily distinguish between quality it also allows lots of pointless or stupid apps to also be just as available (of course what I consider pointless or stupid may be entirely different from what you consider stupid or pointless).

The only problem I see from my perspective is that there are very likely some very useful and very high quality apps available that I might not try (or might not even be aware of) simply because they are $4.99 or $9.99 (without adds) and there is a plethora of alternatives for free or 99 cents.

I have not kept very close track - but I have downloaded 167 apps - with about a dozen maybe paid versions -maybe a few more than that - with the majority at 99 cents - and though I cannot recall the most expensive - there were a couple at $4.99 and a few at $2.99. Although a few are companion apps to paid products on the computer - Delicious Library for example.
post #20 of 42
that's one more reason for me to staying with 3.1.3
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post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopper View Post

And if there's only an ad-supported version of the app?

Problem still solved? No?

Knee-jerk much?

Don't buy the app. You can live without it!
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post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Millennial Media, the largest independent mobile adverting network, has released figures for July showing Apple leads mobile devices in general with its iOS platform and smartphones in particular with iPhone.

.



No surprise. Apple customers generally spend lots of money on things that they just kinda want. Steve has created a monster demographic for just about anyone who wants that sort of customer (and everyone wants that sort of customer), and now he scoops up the advertising revenue for the big spenders he has aggregated.

I love Steve. I plan to buy stuff from every company that buys iAds.
post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

I can block Google's ads. Is there an ad blocker for in-app ads on the iPhone?

iAds are the finest quality - both the ads and the products. They enhance the User Experience. No way will Steve allow malcontents to block them. Every iPhone user needs to get the same good User Experience as every other iPhone user, and ad blocking would ruin it all.
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


Who ever told you that everything in life was free?



It is crazy how everyone thinks everything should be 100% free. Keep up the good work, JR.
post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SendMe View Post

iAds are the finest quality - both the ads and the products. They enhance the User Experience. No way will Steve allow malcontents to block them. Every iPhone user needs to get the same good User Experience as every other iPhone user, and ad blocking would ruin it all.

You're really going to keep doing this, huh? Oh well, whatever floats your (borderline mentally ill) boat.
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post #26 of 42
Lets try to see this info through a different light:

Almost every android application is ad-supported. That's because its a pain to sell applications on the Android MarketPlace (or whatever Android's store is called).

Check this link out: http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/08/16/...-losing-money/

A quote from the article above:

Quote:
You can only pay for apps in 13 out of the 46 or so countries where Android phones are available. For those of you who like stats, 13 in 46 works out to less than 30%. Contrast this with Apples App Store, which supports paid apps in 90 countries. This is a huge advantage iPhone developers currently have over Android developers.

That means most of what you can get out of Android is free and ad supported.

On the other hand, we have the app store. Which MOST content is paid, and just a few ad-supported. (I don't have numbers to back me up on this, its my own anecdotal experience)

And still, iOS has 55% of the ads. What does this tell you?
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilgto64 View Post

I suppose the folks who dislike ads on their phone so much don't ever listen to commercial radio, or television, or have a phone book in their house or drive bas billboard (and other outdoor advertising such as on the side of a bus). What would television look like and how many channels would thre be if EVERY program was pay-per-view?

I try my best to either avoid all of those, or strip the ads out before I use them. We're subjected to a barrage of advertising everywhere we go, and it's already far too much. The last thing we need are ads on our phones, it's unacceptable.

edit: I just discovered there is an iAd blocker. Looks like I'll just jailbreak, and move along.
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SendMe View Post


I love Steve. I plan to buy stuff from every company that buys iAds.

Wow!!!!


I'm in tears over here....
post #29 of 42
I don't mind the ads. After all, clicking on them is optional, right?
post #30 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by SendMe View Post

iAds are the finest quality - both the ads and the products. They enhance the User Experience. No way will Steve allow malcontents to block them. Every iPhone user needs to get the same good User Experience as every other iPhone user, and ad blocking would ruin it all.

I'm so happy that you've got it all figured out. All the fools on these boards can look to you when they're not sure how they should think or live.
post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

edit: I just discovered there is an iAd blocker. Looks like I'll just jailbreak, and move along.

That's the selfish, mediocre approach that hinders the development of an app store of any kind.
If you are so bothered by ads, instead, get paid applications that don't have ads.

Those that are free, and have ads, are supported by ads. By circumventing their ability to make money with ads you are pushing the market to only provide paid apps, is that what you really want?
post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by extremeskater View Post

Not sure why people look at this as good news. Guess what people don't like ads.

Extreme, answer me this honestly, how much "stuff" have you bought in the last 5 years, where your buying decision was not influenced, directly or indirectly, by ads you came across in some form of media or another?

IMHO, ads are kind of like a lawyer, in that, we all hate them .... until we need them .... and then they're our "best friend".
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post #33 of 42
Isn't that font used in the title of the pie chart graphic that annoying default Winblows OS font?
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz1492 View Post

... How far are we from having the Best iAds of the Year event? People in love with ads?

Happens on TV.

Every year. They're the CLIO awards: http://www.clioawards.com/

Some day the Webby awards might be as big...

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post #35 of 42
I like it that way, it would stink to have a paid subscription to view anything worthwhile. Ads keep developers happy and apps low cost.
post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by nsbm View Post

As a developer I find statements like this frustrating. Unless you are willing to pay for all your apps, how else do you expect developers to make a living? They have to monetize their apps either by selling them or by using display ads.

Look like IPhone user is more rich (demographically in tune with what ever you try to sell?) and worth to be targetted by Marketing?
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by emsilva View Post

That's the selfish, mediocre approach that hinders the development of an app store of any kind.
If you are so bothered by ads, instead, get paid applications that don't have ads.

Those that are free, and have ads, are supported by ads. By circumventing their ability to make money with ads you are pushing the market to only provide paid apps, is that what you really want?

No to both. We already see too many ads, and we already pay too much for what we get with mobile computing. Developers should find ways to get their money from the billions that Apple and the telecos are making instead of being just another gouge on the consumer.
post #38 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

No to both. We already see too many ads, and we already pay too much for what we get with mobile computing. Developers should find ways to get their money from the billions that Apple and the telecos are making instead of being just another gouge on the consumer.

What's it like to be living in "fantasy land" ? ....... Somebody else who wants everything for nothing .... not very realistic by a long shot ...
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post #39 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

What's it like to be living in "fantasy land" ? ....... Somebody else who wants everything for nothing .... not very realistic by a long shot ...

Who wants something for nothing? I'm already paying a lot.
post #40 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by airmanchairman View Post

I never purport to speak for "people" or the "end user", regardless of what the perceived popular view of anything is. I always assess a thing on its merits, not on people's popular perception of it.

Accordingly, when I see an unobtrusive advert header at the bottom or top of a desktop or mobile screen, my first inclination is not to get rid of it - I read it first, then decide what to do, whether to read further or dispose of it.

This way I've actually found stuff I've been looking for and have had little luck with using search engines (Newsflash: advertisers use trending to serve you ads that might interest you, based on your prior preferences, location etc).

I personally think that the "two legs bad, four legs good" knee-jerk attitude against advertising is infantile and self-defeating. It's a clever way to offset 3rd party development costs, and keep everyone happy.

As (mobile) hardware becomes more and more of a commodity, its price will continue to plummet (we've seen this happen in the PC/Desktop market already), and ads will increasingly become the way to add value to units. In anticipation of this future scenario, Apple has accepted this reality and taken steps to invest in it on behalf of its shareholders, its developers AND its end-users. The acquisition of Quattro and its conversion to iAds is not a mere "hobbyist" venture.


we all love it so much. we are tired of technology that doesn't behave like tv and give us ads every 10 seconds. i am not alone in imagining the day that we can be hard at work on a document and be forced to stop working and watch an advert. oh the joy!
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