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First look: Taking HDR photos with Apple's iOS 4.1

post #1 of 99
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When iOS 4.1 ships next week, iPhone and iPod touch users will have a new feature that allows for better photos in bright lighting: High Dynamic Range. AppleInsider offers a first look at the new technology built right in to the iOS Camera application.

HDR photos allow for superior pictures in daylight or other bright settings. Particularly when a shadow is cast on the subject or a part of the photo, it allows for a more accurate representation that doesn't allow the light or shadow sources to overpower the picture and result in a murky or discolored photo.

The new feature aims to prevent photos that are "blown out" with too much light. It accomplishes this by taking three photos in rapid succession: one with normal exposure, one underexposed, and another overexposed.

By combining these three photos, iOS 4.1 uses what Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs referred to in his keynote Wednesday as "pretty sophisticated algorithms" to produce an HDR photo.

"It's really remarkable in some photos," Jobs said. He then showed examples of how HDR allows a picture to capture colors in the sky and details in the foreground that otherwise would have been blown out by the light of the sun.

Tested on an iPhone 4, the HDR function is in fact a great option for users built right in to the native Camera application. If a picture is appropriately focused before it is snapped, the resulting photo is often superior to the regular picture.

On the left, without HDR. On the right, with HDR enabled.

Based on the conditions of the shot, HDR option won't always provide a better photo, but through the Settings application, users can elect to save both the "normal" photo and the HDR photo, and they can go back and decide which shot looks better. Users are asked if they want to save both HDR and regular photos the first time they boot the application after installing iOS 4.1.

In general, focusing the iPhone 4 camera lens on a darker area results in a better picture with HDR enabled. Focusing on a brighter area, however, can sometimes have the opposite effect, and create in a photo even more blown out -- particularly if the photo is a bright subject being snapped from the shade.

On the right, HDR fixes the overpowering sunlight seen in the normal photo.

Photo taken from shade, HDR photo on the right results in a more washed out sky, though areas in shadow have more detail.

On the left, without HDR. On the right, with HDR enabled.

The HDR feature does not work with pictures snapped with the forward facing camera on the iPhone 4. Selecting HDR also automatically turns off the flash function for the rear camera. Changing the flash back to auto or on will likewise disable HDR.

When taking a photo, the Camera app presents an on-screen toggle to switch HDR on or off, wedged between to the flash and camera swap controls.

When browsing photos in Camera Roll, HDR snaps are identified appropriately in the upper left corner.

HDR options in the Settings app.

Other changes in 4.1

iOS 4.1 also fixes bugs that have existed in iOS 4, including a problematic proximity sensor issue that would cause the touchscreen to sometimes become active when a user was on a call. It also addresses problems with Bluetooth connectivity, and slow performance for users running the iPhone 3G.



The latest version of iOS also brings the ability to upload HD video over Wi-Fi, including uploads to YouTube. It also allows for TV show rentals, which were unveiled alongside the new Apple TV introduced Wednesday. And iOS 4.1 also ships with Game Center, Apple's social media service for gamers with friends lists and achievements.

iOS 4.1 will become available for recent generation iPhones and iPod touches next Wednesday Sept 8. It will be followed by iOS 4.2, which will bring wireless printing and AirPlay to the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad in November.

For more on iOS 4.1, see AppleInsider's previous in-depth look: Inside Apple's iOS 4.1 update: proximity sensor fix, Game Center, more.
post #2 of 99
I ain't losing my jailbreak over that.

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post #3 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crunch View Post

I ain't losing my jailbreak over that.

Nor am I. But it does leave me looking forward to a jailbroken 4.1.
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post #4 of 99
This is a pretty cool feature. I've done HDR by hand, and it can be a tedious process. Too bad it doesn't work with the flash, because sometimes those are the photos that need it the most.

For instance, I've taken photos of people at night on the beach with flash, and the background details are lost in the darkness. That's when HDR would come in handy, blending a non-flashed background with a flashed-subject.
post #5 of 99
Looks good!
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post #6 of 99
Having already updated my phone to 4.1 via unofficial channels, I can tell you that the feature is outstanding. At this point, the point and shoot industry is having a hard time justifying its existence.
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Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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post #7 of 99
It will be interesting to see how Apple's HDR implementation stacks up to some of the 3rd party apps. I have been using ProHDR and have been very happy with it.

-kpluck

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post #8 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

This is a pretty cool feature. I've done HDR by hand, and it can be a tedious process. Too bad it doesn't work with the flash, because sometimes those are the photos that need it the most.

For instance, I've taken photos of people at night on the beach with flash, and the background details are lost in the darkness. That's when HDR would come in handy, blending a non-flashed background with a flashed-subject.

Exposure blending is not the same as HDR and tone mapping. Both can be useful.
post #9 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

It will be interesting to see how Apple's HDR implementation stacks up to some of the 3rd party apps. I have been using ProHDR and have been very happy with it.

I can address that, as I am, was, a ProHDR app user. Overall, I would say that third party solutions have to try a lot harder, now. With PHDR, you have to wait for the program to take three pictures and try to keep things steady in the process. With the built-in camera, you just snap your pic, and it takes it instantly.

In truth, three pictures are taken in the background, as I understand it. But you never notice anything other than the one picture that is quickly taken. You do have to wait for a few seconds for the pictures to process. But again, you do not have to keep holding steady while that happens. There is just a short delay between the time you take one pic before going to the next.

I think Apple also made some white balance improvements, as everything about the HDR picture looks much truer to what you saw when you took the picture.
Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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Apple has no competition. Every commercial product which competes directly with an Apple product gives the distinct impression that, Where it is original, it is not good, and where it is good, it...
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post #10 of 99
Now just need Apple to add HDR processing to Aperture and iPhoto since most, if not all, DSLRs can already automatically take the sets of exposures for HDR. And add a few slider controls for the blending.
post #11 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivertrip View Post

Exposure blending is not the same as HDR and tone mapping. Both can be useful.

I've been reading up on this for the last few days in anticipation. I have yet to find a straight-forward explanation of the differences between HDR, exposure blending and tone mapping. It sounds like the latter two are essentially methods within the HDR process, but that might not be entirely accurate. From what I'm hearing, the iPhone version of HDR is essentially exposure blending. I wonder how much these distinctions will matter to the audience Apple is targeting for iPhone HDR.
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post #12 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crunch View Post

I ain't losing my jailbreak over that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

Nor am I. But it does leave me looking forward to a jailbroken 4.1.

You don't have to you can steal the proHDR App from the pirate repositories that jailbreaking enables.

You can even use the lame old excuse of "I'm only testing it before I buy it".
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #13 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I wonder how much these distinctions will matter to the audience Apple is targeting for iPhone HDR.

It won't matter at all. They get a better shot. It's -easy-, no options etc.

Some "Pro's" will show they aren't pro by complaining it's only this or that.

It might increase sales of HDR apps as people become interested in the idea from being -exposed- to it and then wanting more options.
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you only have freedom in choice when you know you have no choice
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post #14 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

You don't have to you can steal the proHDR App from the pirate repositories that jailbreaking enables.

You can even use the lame old excuse of "I'm only testing it before I buy it".

No need to be a proactive dick.

What kind of ass assumes all jailbroken device users pirate apps?

I've spent over $400 on the App Store and have zero pirated apps on my phone. I haven't even installed the hack that would enable me to download them in the first place. I jailbreak because I don't love any games quite like I love some of those old Super Nintendo/NES/GBA games I used to play. Jailbreaking gives me access to nearly all of them and much more enjoyment out of my device. And before you decide to be a dick about that, too, I actually own physical copies of the games I play. I probably should have sold them.
The true measure of a man is how he treats someone that can do him absolutely no good.
  Samuel Johnson
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The true measure of a man is how he treats someone that can do him absolutely no good.
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post #15 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

And before you decide to be a dick about that, too, I actually own physical copies of the games I play. I probably should have sold them.

That you own physical copies is neither here nor there. It might justify what you're doing in your mind but it doesn't change the equation at all.

I also jailbreak as it happens and have zero pirated apps. Solely jailbroken for SBSettings, which I can live without but 1 action access to a significant device settings such as brightness and turning wi-fi off (for Runkeeper) is so convenient. I am surprised Apple haven't implemented such a scheme themselves.

I rarely take my standalone camera along anymore and this addition to iOS should make things even better. But, like you I will wait until a jailbreak comes along.
post #16 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by rivertrip View Post

Exposure blending is not the same as HDR and tone mapping. Both can be useful.

You are incorrect. Actually HDR, or high dynamic range images, are achieved by blending several (I use 3) exposures of low dynamic range, LDR i.e. 'normal images'. The three are taken at different exposures to capture the luminance of the three exposures, usually one stop apart, one either side of the best compromise and best if they are RAW for obvious reasons. Tonal mapping is a procedure done with the data collected and merged within the software used for the afore mentioned process - mainly contrast compression to allow viewing of the effect in a lower dynamic range. I have been playing with this for a while using high end software and RAW images. It can create some mind boggling results. Apple I suspect have a simplified system here but never the less a useful feature that adds some fun to a simple iPhone.
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post #17 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

Having already updated my phone to 4.1 via unofficial channels, I can tell you that the feature is outstanding. At this point, the point and shoot industry is having a hard time justifying its existence.

So far I've had the opposite reaction. Apple's HDR algorithm seems to really wash out color and make things seem flat and lifeless in my tests. There are maybe 1 in 10 shots that it improves and 5 in 10 it makes worse. I fear that everyone is going to turn on HDR and leave it on and just get slower performance (HDR pics take several seconds to take on an iPhone4 versus instant for normal pics) and worse results.
post #18 of 99
This is _NOT_ an HDR photo, its a regular photo thats been processed as a combination of three other regular photos. Please do your research before mindlessly and incorrectly expanding Apple's RDF, AI...

The camera is _not_ HDR. The resultant photo is _not_ HDR. The process in between could just possibly be called HDR, but we'd need to see a sensor of at least 9 or 10 bits to truly claim an HDR process: 1-8 for low exposure, 2-9 for medium, 3-10 for high, or some such. If not, you're just combining three 8-bit images, one of which is underexposed and one overexposed/bleached, in order to reduce dark and bleached areas.
post #19 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac Voyer View Post

Having already updated my phone to 4.1 via unofficial channels, I can tell you that the feature is outstanding. At this point, the point and shoot industry is having a hard time justifying its existence.

I suspect that in about two to three years we ought to have sensors using Quantum Dots which should dramatically improve the sensitivity of cell phone cameras. Of course that is only one element needed to improve the utility of cell phone cameras, we still need a way to stuff better optics into these small devices. There is nothing digital that can compare to a good zoom lens for example.

In any event cell cameras are closer than they every have been to being good enough.

Dave
post #20 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

You are incorrect. Actually HDR, or high dynamic range images, are achieved by blending several (I use 3) exposures of low dynamic range, LDR i.e. 'normal images'. The three are taken at different exposures to capture the luminance of the three exposures, usually one stop apart, one either side of the best compromise and best if they are RAW for obvious reasons. Tonal mapping is a procedure done with the data collected and merged within the software used for the afore mentioned process. I have been playing with this for a while using high end software and RAW images. It can create some mind boggling results. Apple I suspect have a simplified system here but never the less a useful feature that adds some fun to a simple iPhone.

Not at all. An HDR image is 'higher dynamic range', really, than the commonly accepted 8-bits (256 steps) of current image technology. You need an image of 9 bits or more to be an HDR image as the term is currently accepted.

Apple _is_ exposure blending, and it's a great effect, but it's not HDR.
post #21 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

This is a pretty cool feature. I've done HDR by hand, and it can be a tedious process. Too bad it doesn't work with the flash, because sometimes those are the photos that need it the most.

For instance, I've taken photos of people at night on the beach with flash, and the background details are lost in the darkness. That's when HDR would come in handy, blending a non-flashed background with a flashed-subject.

Google Slow Sync Flash. That is the technique that already exists to do what you request and it is better if you are handholding or shooting human subjects since there is only one exposre taken.

Of course the iPhone has no manual controls, but perhaps an enterprising App developer could implement this technique in software...

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post #22 of 99
The iphone 4's camera is superb!!!!
I took a picture of an orange beach cruiser(bike, old school) and them I emailed it to myself. Then I opened it on ipad. DAM*!!!
I made it my background and the quality is breathtaking. Now with ISO 4.1 for ipad coming out I will be able to send photos to my ipad thru wifi. Love it!!!!
And has anyone used Pages and Numbers for the ipad? Jesus they are awesome!
post #23 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I've been reading up on this for the last few days in anticipation. I have yet to find a straight-forward explanation of the differences between HDR, exposure blending and tone mapping. It sounds like the latter two are essentially methods within the HDR process, but that might not be entirely accurate. From what I'm hearing, the iPhone version of HDR is essentially exposure blending. I wonder how much these distinctions will matter to the audience Apple is targeting for iPhone HDR.

You are correct. It has been dressed up to sound complicated for the justification of the pro apps I suspect. Several images of varying exposures are merged. Tone mapping allows a level of control over the various elements such as contrast curves and in pro apps you can save and apply pre sets that are useful in different types of images. These are applied in RAM before the final merged image is written to disk. The software I use only works on RAW images.
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post #24 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwatson View Post

Not at all. An HDR image is 'higher dynamic range', really, than the commonly accepted 8-bits (256 steps) of current image technology. You need an image of 9 bits or more to be an HDR image as the term is currently accepted.

Apple _is_ exposure blending, and it's a great effect, but it's not HDR.

Hence it is always done in RAW on pro apps and Apple have some simplified system here. You have to tone map and save as an image for distribution in LDR at the end of the process, I wonder if Apple is working in HDR in RAM but saving to disk as LDR?
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post #25 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

No need to be a proactive dick.

What kind of ass assumes all jailbroken device users pirate apps?

I've spent over $400 on the App Store and have zero pirated apps on my phone. I haven't even installed the hack that would enable me to download them in the first place. I jailbreak because I don't love any games quite like I love some of those old Super Nintendo/NES/GBA games I used to play. Jailbreaking gives me access to nearly all of them and much more enjoyment out of my device. And before you decide to be a dick about that, too, I actually own physical copies of the games I play. I probably should have sold them.

Ironically, all of those SNES and NES ROMs you have on your phone are technically illegal.
post #26 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwatson View Post

Not at all. An HDR image is 'higher dynamic range', really, than the commonly accepted 8-bits (256 steps) of current image technology. You need an image of 9 bits or more to be an HDR image as the term is currently accepted.

Apple _is_ exposure blending, and it's a great effect, but it's not HDR.

You are incorrect. what you are describing is a high bit depth image which increases the number of samples from 0 to 1 per pixel per channel. the actual lightness & darkness range between 0 and 1 can range from 6 stops to 10 or more depending on how well you've done HDR. My point is, after processing an HDR you can certainly fit the resulting image into an 8bit per channel HDR image made from 8 bit per channel bracketed source images that shows 10 stops of dynamic range from the real world. One can take a single expose with a 14bit sensor, run it through RAW processing and it will be clipped off at 7 (for example) stops of dynamic range from the real world.

If you don't believe be, go check out Photoshop. Take an 8 bit per channel image and set it to 16bit per channel mode. You can't make the blacks any darker or the whites any whiter if they were properly set in the 8bit file. Likewise, if you take 3 bracketed images and create an HDR image as both 8 & 16 bit per channel files, they will look the same to you.

High bit depth images are really only useful for heavy tonal remapping so as to not introduce banding artifacts into the image.

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nothing to see here

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post #27 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

This is a pretty cool feature. I've done HDR by hand, and it can be a tedious process. Too bad it doesn't work with the flash, because sometimes those are the photos that need it the most.

For instance, I've taken photos of people at night on the beach with flash, and the background details are lost in the darkness. That's when HDR would come in handy, blending a non-flashed background with a flashed-subject.

It's NOT HDR, it's tone mapping. HUGE DIFFERENCE.

Did they increase the dynamic range of the image sensor?

Do you have a monitor that can view that new dynamic range?

I'm guessing that most consumers and even pro-sumers, the answer is a definitive NO. Apple is simply doing in-software-TONE-MAPPING.
post #28 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by polymnia View Post

You are incorrect. what you are describing is a high bit depth image which increases the number of samples from 0 to 1 per pixel per channel. the actual lightness & darkness range between 0 and 1 can range from 6 stops to 10 or more depending on how well you've done HDR. My point is, after processing an HDR you can certainly fit the resulting image into an 8bit per channel HDR image made from 8 bit per channel bracketed source images that shows 10 stops of dynamic range from the real world. One can take a single expose with a 14bit sensor, run it through RAW processing and it will be clipped off at 7 (for example) stops of dynamic range from the real world.

If you don't believe be, go check out Photoshop. Take an 8 bit per channel image and set it to 16bit per channel mode. You can't make the blacks any darker or the whites any whiter if they were properly set in the 8bit file. Likewise, if you take 3 bracketed images and create an HDR image as both 8 & 16 bit per channel files, they will look the same to you.

High bit depth images are really only useful for heavy tonal remapping so as to not introduce banding artifacts into the image.

Perfect example of TONE MAPPING, not HDR.
post #29 of 99
I heard they were present in the beta of IOS 4.0 but pulled out at the last moment.
post #30 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by hill60 View Post

You don't have to you can steal the proHDR App from the pirate repositories that jailbreaking enables.

You can even use the lame old excuse of "I'm only testing it before I buy it".

↑↑↑↑↑ *grade A fanboi post*



Quote:
Originally Posted by Xian Zhu Xuande View Post

No need to be a proactive dick.

What kind of ass assumes all jailbroken device users pirate apps?

I've spent over $400 on the App Store and have zero pirated apps on my phone. I haven't even installed the hack that would enable me to download them in the first place. I jailbreak because I don't love any games quite like I love some of those old Super Nintendo/NES/GBA games I used to play. Jailbreaking gives me access to nearly all of them and much more enjoyment out of my device. And before you decide to be a dick about that, too, I actually own physical copies of the games I play. I probably should have sold them.


You're wasting your time rationalizing with hill60 and the like about the merits and justifications of jailbreaking. They don't get it. They don't know how to do it. They're intimidated by what they can not comprehend.
post #31 of 99
I am not very skilled in photography so can some one answer me this: The article said that HDR is good for bright days to put more detail into washed out pictures. Does that mean I don't want to use HDR in darker settings or when it's cloudy? Thanks in advance.
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post #32 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

I am not very skilled in photography so can some one answer me this: The article said that HDR is good for bright days to put more detail into washed out pictures. Does that mean I don't want to use HDR in darker settings or when it's cloudy? Thanks in advance.

Based on my understanding of HDR images in the new iPod Touch and iPhone update, using HDR will give you one image as if HDR was not used and a second image with HDR. You'll have the opportunity to save the better image.

In my opinion, HDR can only help an image, especially in high contrast settings. In low contrast settings, there may be little to no difference between the normal image and the HDR image.
post #33 of 99
I did a write up some time ago about how to do HDR photography with a simply point-and-shoot digital camera. Though the camera on the iPhone 4 is pretty good, the colors and exposure control leave a lot to be desired.

You can read more here:

http://www.kimballlarsen.com/2008/09...e-photography/
and
http://www.kimballlarsen.com/2010/01...e-photography/

I'd be interested in any feedback on my HDR technique....

Thanks!
post #34 of 99
Typically, with a DSLR, it is better to do HDR by taking multiple exposurers with a range of shutter speeds while keeping the f-stop (aperature) the same. This eliminates depth of focus anomilies that will otherwise occur. In other words, stopping the lens down will increase the depth of focus, making part of the image in focus; the other range of exposures, with the lens aperature open wider, will result in the smae object possibly being out of focus. It's harder to combine such images.
post #35 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

You are correct. It has been dressed up to sound complicated for the justification of the pro apps I suspect. Several images of varying exposures are merged. Tone mapping allows a level of control over the various elements such as contrast curves and in pro apps you can save and apply pre sets that are useful in different types of images. These are applied in RAM before the final merged image is written to disk. The software I use only works on RAW images.

When this hits the streets, we can anticipate a lot of sniffing and looking down of noses by the pros who will tell us that what Apple is offering isn't "real" HDR and how anyone who thinks otherwise is very much deluded, a fanboy, or blinded by Apple's marketing, or all three. The fact that it helps people take better photographs (with their phone, no less), no matter what you call it, won't figure into this criticism. Place your wagers now...
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post #36 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by am8449 View Post

For instance, I've taken photos of people at night on the beach with flash, and the background details are lost in the darkness. That's when HDR would come in handy, blending a non-flashed background with a flashed-subject.

The HDR won't work in this case. Too much exposure difference. The area with flash (normal exposure) and the background that flash couldn't cover could easily be more than 5 stops difference. In short, it's impossible in this case. That's why it's not enabled with flash.
And that's why pro photographer must knows "when", "where" and "how" to take photograph.
post #37 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwatson View Post

Not at all. An HDR image is 'higher dynamic range', really, than the commonly accepted 8-bits (256 steps) of current image technology. You need an image of 9 bits or more to be an HDR image as the term is currently accepted.

Apple _is_ exposure blending, and it's a great effect, but it's not HDR.

Not necessarily true. Dynamic range in photography is the digital term for the difference in exposure. Since early digital photography has less dynamic range than film, especially black & white film, HDR was invented. The process is just to combine the best part of different exposures. No need for difference of "color bits" since film never has color bits information.
The process you explained should be called "High Color Dynamic Range".
post #38 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by kpluck View Post

It will be interesting to see how Apple's HDR implementation stacks up to some of the 3rd party apps. I have been using ProHDR and have been very happy with it.

-kpluck

I have been using TrueHDR, the image matching is hit and miss. Sometimes nice, sometimes colours and resolution is poor. This Apple HDR, assuming it is available on the 3GS, will be awesome. F the jailbreak...
post #39 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

When this hits the streets, we can anticipate a lot of sniffing and looking down of noses by the pros who will tell us that what Apple is offering isn't "real" HDR and how anyone who thinks otherwise is very much deluded, a fanboy, or blinded by Apple's marketing, or all three. The fact that it helps people take better photographs (with their phone, no less), no matter what you call it, won't figure into this criticism. Place your wagers now...

And in 3... 2... 1....

Quote:
Originally Posted by MOEW View Post

It's NOT HDR, it's tone mapping. HUGE DIFFERENCE.

Did they increase the dynamic range of the image sensor?

Do you have a monitor that can view that new dynamic range?

I'm guessing that most consumers and even pro-sumers, the answer is a definitive NO. Apple is simply doing in-software-TONE-MAPPING.

There ya go.
post #40 of 99
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

I've been reading up on this for the last few days in anticipation. I have yet to find a straight-forward explanation of the differences between HDR, exposure blending and tone mapping. It sounds like the latter two are essentially methods within the HDR process, but that might not be entirely accurate. From what I'm hearing, the iPhone version of HDR is essentially exposure blending. I wonder how much these distinctions will matter to the audience Apple is targeting for iPhone HDR.

It's a cell phone camera. It's mostly just exposure blending, I assume. The audience won't care, they'll just think, cool, better looking pictures*. Anyone else that cares should be using a DSLR anyways.

*Of course, this is as debatable as "real" HDR photography itself. You lose the stronger contrast sometimes. In the pro photo world HDR is still quite controversial.

Until there comes a time when I can get a Canon 5D mark II with those red stripe lenses (yes, doesn't automatically mean those are the best lenses) without having to live on the streets.... iPhone 3GS snaps is enough for me. I only keep some nature and music event photos now for simple memory keepsakes.
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