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iLife '11 Family Pack from Apple, Parallels 6 both spotted early - Page 3

post #81 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Your link isnt very informative. Neros system requirements page on the other hand is informative.
For playback of protected high definition content (home recorded BD-AV or AVCREC discs), additionally:

For 64bit systems, Windows Vista or later is required
The installed Blu-ray Disc drive must support AACS

Additional Requirements for Playing Protected High-ResolutionContent

One of the following processors with at least the specified clock speed: AMD Athlon 64 FX 2.6 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 X2 2.2 GHz, AMD Turion 64 X2 2 GHz, Intel® CoreDuo 2 GHz, Intel® Core 2 Duo 1.8 GHz, Intel® Pentium® Extreme Edition 3.2 GHz, Intel® Pentium® D 3.4 GHz
Minimum 1 GB RAM
Up to 50 GB free hard drive space for Blu-ray Disc BD-R/RE dual layer disc images
Up to 30 GB free drive space for HD DVD-R/RW dual layer disc images
Minimum Vista® for 64-bit systems
AACS support by means of the installed Blu-ray Disc or HD DVD drive
Graphics card with at least 256 MB video RAM based on: nVidia GeForce 6600GT, 7600GT, 7800GTX512, 7900GS, 7900GT, 7900GX, 7900GTX, 7950GT, 7950GTX, 8500, 8600, 8800, 8400M, 8600M or newer. ATI series X1600, X1650, X1800, X1900, X1950, Radeon HD or newer in one of the following board and screen combinations: PCI-Express/Onboard video board with built-in display (e.g. notebook or integrated PC). PCI-Express video board with support for DVI/HDMI and HDCP, screen/television with HDMI input or HDCP supported DVI input. PCI-Express video board with VGA output and VGA monitor. PCI-Express video board with component video output and video output, CGMS-A and Macrovision support, television or projector. On analog monitors some discs display only at low resolution or not at all.
The newest graphics drivers with COPP support. Recommended: ATI Catalyst 7.5, nVidia ForceWare 94.24 (Windows XP), ForceWare 158.22 (Windows XP / GeForce 8 Series), ForceWare 158.24 (Windows Vista) or higher
Microsoft® .Net Framework 2.0 must be installed prior to Nero Suite in order to play interactive HDi content on HD DVD-Video
For optimal resolution, the graphics card and the screen should support HDCP - some combinations of graphics card and screen produce poor resolution
Internet connection for updating AACS keys. These are needed in order to play AACS protected Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD videos. See the respective device manual to determine whether a screen or TV device supports HDCP.

It clearly states that AACS must be included for protected content to play. How else is that going to happen unless Apple allows it?

AACS is simply a standard for managing Digital Copyright information. It DOES NOT have to be included in an operating system. It Must, however, be included in a Software player or a hardware player, components.. All it does is check to see that the drive, video card, etc.. is the right type. The hardware does the rest. If the signal is broken on Digital Content for example, the hardware simply won't play the signal. its' simply a standard.

For example, a HDCP Video card is required, or an internal video system such as an iMac, or Laptop would work fine. The MiniDisplay port is HDCP compliant so it would register in the software player fine. The BluRay Drive would register too. thats the only Communication required by AACS. It wouldn't be too difficult to write a program for this, it's just simply that no one has done it yet.
post #82 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by webraider View Post

It wouldn't be too difficult to write a program for this, it's just simply that no one has done it yet.

As much as I’d like your statement to be accurate it goes against the fact that this does not yet exist despite Roxio long ago adding support for Blu-ray media, but not adding support for playback of AACS encrypted content within Blu-ray media, so I can only conclude that it’s much harder than you’re making it out to be otherwise they and dozens of others would have already created apps.
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post #83 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

As much as Id like your comment to be accurate your statement that it wouldnt be difficult goes against the fact that this does not yet exist. Roxio long ago added support for Blu-ray media, but they did not add support for playback of AACS encrypted content, so I can only conclude that its much harder than youre making it out to be otherwise they and dozens of others would have already created apps.

Roxio makes a BluRay player for Windows. Works on Vista, Windows 7 AND XP. PLease note there is no AACS in Any of these version of Windows. AACS is only in the player that Roxio provides.

http://www.roxio.com/enu/products/ci.../overview.html
post #84 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by webraider View Post

Roxio makes a BluRay player for Windows. Works on Vista, Windows 7 AND XP. PLease note there is no AACS in Any of these version of Windows. AACS is only in the player that Roxio provides.

http://www.roxio.com/enu/products/ci.../overview.html

The reason it hasn't been done yet is that there's not a market for a BluRay player (commercially) If Apple releases their own player. I think people have been waiting to see what Apple would do. If people develop one and then Apple comes out with one, then They won't make any money. However, If Apple shuns it, then Roxio could make some good money.
post #85 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by webraider View Post

Roxio makes a BluRay player for Windows. Works on Vista, Windows 7 AND XP. PLease note there is no AACS in Any of these version of Windows. AACS is only in the player that Roxio provides.

http://www.roxio.com/enu/products/ci.../overview.html

You’re arguing my point even harder now by stating that Roxio makes a Blu-ray player for AACS content for Windows, but not or Mac OS X.


Quote:
Originally Posted by webraider View Post

The reason it hasn't been done yet is that there's not a market for a BluRay player (commercially) If Apple releases their own player. I think people have been waiting to see what Apple would do. If people develop one and then Apple comes out with one, then They won't make any money. However, If Apple shuns it, then Roxio could make some good money.

1) For all these apps Apple makes for consumers I bet i can find some other vendor who has also made an app to do the equivalent task… and that is for apps that already exist.

2) You said it was easy so it should be no issue for Roxio to add playback.

3) If Roxio was afraid of Apple competing with them then why does Toast let you create a DVD (something both iDVD and DVD Studio Pro do)? Why does Toast let you create a music CD (something iTunes does)? Why does toast let you create a data disc (something Disk Utility, Finder, iTunes, and many other apps already do)?

4) It seems DirectX 9.0c is required minimum for all these versions of Windows. Could these collections of APIs be what is allowing AACS to interact smoothly between the compatible Blu-ray player and the GPU, out through the HDCP-enabled ports? I don’t get why it’s so hard to see that MS is more willing to play ball when it comes to optical media than Apple. It’s a logical fallacy to say that it’s easy and yet years later it’s still not added.

5) It’s September 2010. If it was easy to do and in any way profitable they would have done it. Roxio is a smart company, they simply aren’t going to let money pass them up because Apple might do something in the future, as noted by the above examples.
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post #86 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

As much as Id like your statement to be accurate it goes against the fact that this does not yet exist despite Roxio long ago adding support for Blu-ray media, but not adding support for playback of AACS encrypted content within Blu-ray media, so I can only conclude that its much harder than youre making it out to be otherwise they and dozens of others would have already created apps.


nvidia and ATI added this capability into their drivers years ago. back then you had to have a supported video card to play back AACS. now everything does it.

the minimum is still Windows XP and a supported graphics card
post #87 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

You make some good points. But the chair leg thing was from Steve Jobs himself. In 2007 he said, "Weve got two strong legs on our chair today we have the Mac business, which is a $10 billion business, and music, our iPod and iTunes business, which is $10 billion. We hope the iPhone is the third leg on our chair, and maybe one day Apple TV will be the fourth leg"


Now here is something constructive we can deal with, and indirectly addess your original comment on page 1, no. 37 (if anyone cares but us). Back to the iLife topic in a minute . . .

Leg one, Apple humanizes the computer with the Mac. This is why it is increasingly preferred by people who pay attention to their senses, not only the so-called creative crowd that comprises their 'niche,' but also the growing mass of people whose senses have been awakened by digital arts and music of all kinds. This could result in exponential growth for the Mac leg.

Leg two, Apple realizes that internet-distributed art is one big reason we have computers, and that we can try putting 1000s of songs and videos in our pockets and have a marketplace around that. Now they're looking to 'socialize' that with Ping. Could be big.

Leg three, Apple realizes that if the computer is something we can take everywhere in our pockets, then we can communicate with each other and with the world knowledge-base that is the internet, everywhere, anytime. "The internet in your hands." This keyboard-and-mouseless but otherwise not so 'crippled' iOS is stimulating (through competition) an entirely new computer, phone and internet build-out, with unknown, probably vastly positive, economic results.

Leg four, Apple realizes that TV can also be put into the hands of the individual (building on QuickTime, iMovie, Final Cut, iTunes, etc.), and that home TV could have the same weight as global TV if you have something compelling like FaceTime-over-AirTime connected to anyone in the world with an email address. This could be the biggest thing Apple ever did, as Gruber remarked after FT was announced. This is why it gladdens the iMovie fan, still pining (like me) over the loss of the fabulous iMovie 6, to see they are bringing 'precision editing' to the new iLife. All this new video in the Apple TV leg is going to need some editing.

So thank you for reminding us of the four-legged stool. Apple and the Mac are doing just fine, and in contrast to many another mature technological/electronic company, they act like a start-up, like Sj says, no doubt because of their vision. This is unusual in the history of business and industry, and it should be remarked upon at least, if not studied in detail.
post #88 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOFEER View Post

its a great feeling isn't it.....i've been windows free for 4.5 years never looked back

I've been Windows free almost 3 years, and can't wait to go back. Call me a troll or pro-troll, or whatever. Realize that is one of the reasons to go back. I don't like Kool-Aid, and all the other childish behaviors associated with MacHeads.

Windows is far from perfect, but it takes a real PC to best run Linux, and I totally dig Linux!
post #89 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Youre arguing my point even harder now by stating that Roxio makes a Blu-ray player for AACS content for Windows, but not or Mac OS X.

I'm simply backing up my original point that someone doesn't need to wait for Apple or the Mac OS to make a BluRay player for the mac. They didn't wait for Microsoft to do it on Windows, they don't have to WAIT for Apple on the Mac. Microsoft hasn't included some special unique access to AACS in their OS's and Apple won't have to either. They MAY have to in iTunes, but not because of BluRay, but simply because the movie studios want it there. Apple's hardware is already AACS, other than an internal BluRay drive.

Technically you can do it already playback a commercial BluRay by accessing it in MakeMKV and streaming it to VLC. All of the AACS decoding is handled in MakeMKV. All MakeMKV has to do is add their own player.
post #90 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

I personally don't like RapidWeaver. I've tried and I've tried but I really don't see what the fuss is all about.

iWeb is much more configurable and adding third party tools like iWeb Buddy fills the gaps for a lot of things.

I'm really hoping for a major upgrade to iWeb though.

RW is light years ahead of iWeb and will be that way for the foreseeable future. I can't believe this hasn't been addressed yet but as far as customization goes, RW beats iWeb like OSX beats Windows, hands down.

Loghound.com, YourHead.com, SeyDesign.com, along with many more third parties give RW the win in a landslide. RW doesn't even need the third party support to beat iWeb.
Hard-Core.
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Hard-Core.
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post #91 of 91
Arguing about BluRay?

That's pretty interesting.

About as interesting as talking about floppy disks.
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