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Nokia CEO to step down as company still struggles to combat iPhone - Page 4

post #121 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

People tended to stick to the same network when they upgraded their phones.

C.


Then show us the stats. It is called churn rate. According to your statements, churn rate should have increased with the introduction of the iPhone.

Got any facts?
post #122 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


The extent to which consumers switched networks was.

C.

Show us the stats.
post #123 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

What confounds me about the fandroids is that Apple is somehow doomed as Android becomes more widespread. That's as ridiculous as saying, well, the iPhone 3G was doomed because you had BBerry, Symbian, WindowsMobile, etc, and whatever OS all the major non-smart phones ran on.


I am unaware of anybody predicting Apple's demise. Especially due to Android.

Get real.
post #124 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Show us the stats.

Google them for yourself.

Here's a start.

http://gigaom.com/2009/04/22/why-att-is-desperately-addicted-to-the-iphone/


C.
post #125 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Google them for yourself.

Here's a start.

http://gigaom.com/2009/04/22/why-att-is-desperately-addicted-to-the-iphone/


C.

Your cite contains no support for your contention. Extraordinary claims need extraordinary support, and you are advancing a whopper.
post #126 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Your cite contains no support for your contention. Extraordinary claims need extraordinary support, and you are advancing a whopper.

This information isn't hard to find. Can you not bring yourself to search for it?

How about this one?
http://www.tgdaily.com/business-and-...from-recession

Quote:
Its wireless business made up for the landline decline.
AT&T added 2.1 million new wireless subscribers in the quarter,
which is down from 2.7 million a year ago. The growth slowed due primarily to a matured
market as most now have at least
one cellphone with a service plan. It's remarkable that 90%
of new subscribers came to AT&T thanks to iPhone 3G and its service lock.

But really do you need anything more extraordinary than the elephant in the room?

Apple has become the most profitable handset manufacturer on the planet - after just three and a bit years. Does that not, in any way, suggest that something remarkable has happened here?

The previous business model enjoyed by Nokia has collapsed because at the profitable end of the market, customers suddenly demanded a better product, and were prepared to abandon their existing carriers to get it.

Nokia has had four years to formulate a response to this sea change in the industry. To this most disruptive of disruptive products. And their response is....

Sit on your hands for four years, then hire a foreigner.

C.
post #127 of 203
You say Nokia phones have been failing where is this because it sure is not in Asia where I live as Nokia seems to be number 1 here. Motorola is a complete flop here with no distribution at all.
post #128 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by gerald apple View Post

You say Nokia phones have been failing where is this because it sure is not in Asia where I live as Nokia seems to be number 1 here. Motorola is a complete flop here with no distribution at all.

Nokia's sales have been increasing.
It's the profits that are falling.

C.
post #129 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


The previous business model enjoyed by Nokia has collapsed because at the profitable end of the market, customers suddenly demanded a better product, and were prepared to abandon their existing carriers to get it.

Nokia has had four years to formulate a response to this sea change in the industry. To this most disruptive of disruptive products. And their response is....

Sit on your hands for four years, then hire a foreigner.

C.



Most people might disagree with you:

Nokia Named World’s Most Sustainable Tech Company Twice

http://www.allheadlinenews.com/artic...ompany%20Twice




The annual review of the DJSI family is based on a
thorough analysis of corporate economic, environmental and social performance, assessing
issues such as corporate governance, risk management, branding, climate change mitigation,
supply chain standards and labor practices. It accounts for general as well as industry specific
sustainability criteria for each of the 57 sectors defined according to the Industry Classification
Benchmark (ICB).
In addition, SAM also identified the top company for each of the 19 Supersectors that the 57
sectors roll up to. The new 2010/2011 Supersector leaders are Air France-KLM (Travel &
Leisure), AkzoNobel (Chemicals), ANZ Banking Group (Banks), BMW (Automobiles & Parts),
EDP Energias de Portugal (Utilities), GPT Group (Real Estate), Investimentos Itaú (Financial
Services), Lotte Shopping (Retail), Nokia (Technology), Pearson (Media), Philips Electronics
(Personal & Household Goods), Roche (Health Care), Sasol (Oil & Gas), Siam Cement
(Construction & Materials), Swiss Re (Insurance), Telefónica (Telecommunications), TNT
(Industrial Goods & Services), Unilever (Food & Beverage) and Xstrata (Basic Resources).

http://www.sustainability-index.com/...9_Review10.pdf





Maybe the folks at Dow Jones know more than you do?
post #130 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Most people might disagree with you:

Nokia Named Worlds Most Sustainable Tech Company Twice

http://www.allheadlinenews.com/artic...ompany%20Twice

Grin.

Which facts would they be disagreeing with?

Did you read your link? It's about "green-type-sustainability" - not Nokia's ability to sustain itself during a dramatic market upheaval.

C.
post #131 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Grin.

Which facts would they be disagreeing with?

Did you read your link? It's about "green-type-sustainability" - not Nokia's ability to sustain itself during a dramatic market upheaval.

C.

Did you read my post?

"The annual review of the DJSI family is based on a
thorough analysis of corporate economic, environmental and social performance, assessing
issues such as corporate governance, risk management, branding, climate change mitigation,
supply chain standards and labor practices."


The first criteria is economic performance. Bankrupt companies, obviously, are not sustainable. Neither are shaky companies.

But Nokia has been awarded the top honors by Dow Jones as the company most likely to sustain itself.

Dow Jones analyzes corporate economic performance. Dow Jones assesses corporate governance, risk management and branding.


Get in touch with reality.
post #132 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Get in touch with reality.


http://www.sustainability-index.com/...9_Review10.pdf

Quote:
SAM is an investment boutique focused exclusively on Sustainability Investing

Quote:
Based on global sustainability trends, SAM has identified Sustainability Themes such as Water, Energy, Resource Efficiency, Climate Change and Healthy Living. These investment themes are translated into thematic-oriented portfolios which often contain a high portion of small and midsized companies with attractive valuations. The focus lies on companies that develop and market innovative products and services accompanying the emergence of new sectors that are expected to experience above-average growth. As such, sustainability theme investing offers investors attractive return potential.

It's about investing for tree huggers.
Perhaps the reality that investors should look at is the fact that Nokia has lost a third of its value in the last 12 months.

http://www.google.co.uk/finance?chdn...E:NOK&&fct=big

But hey, Nokia shares are so sustainable, buying them is practically like hugging a polar bear.

(link to horrendous polar-bear-related-injuries deleted)

C.
post #133 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Perhaps the reality that investors should look at is the fact that Nokia has lost a third of its value in the last 12 months.


C.


Perhaps you are under the impression that you have better information than Dow Jones.
post #134 of 203
It's obvious from the past month, Newtron has been getting his rocks off by purposefully going against whatever everyone else says, methodically, post-by-post. When his "points" are directly countered, he tries to shift it not-so-subtly to a kind of side angle.

It doesn't matter what you say, Newtron just can't resist trying to counter it.

This is getting tiresome.

Newtron, for example, what the hell has Nokia's "sustainability" (in anything) got to do with anything?
post #135 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

Newtron, for example, what the hell does Nokia's "sustainability"(in anything) got to do with anything?

.



The point was made that Nokia is going to hell in a handbasket.

I countered that far from that being the truth, Nokia has instead been deemed to be the most sustainable (in a broader sense of the word than some folks would like to admit) company in the entire tech sector by Dow Jones.

Please try to keep up.
post #136 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Perhaps you are under the impression that you have better information than Dow Jones.

Yeah Right.

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-...16-706366.html

C.
post #137 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

The point was made that Nokia is going to hell in a handbasket.

No - but it's profit margin is now at 2% and likely to become negative next year. That is a charlie-foxtrot by most people's reckoning.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

I countered that far from that being the truth, Nokia has instead been deemed to be the most sustainable (in a broader sense of the word than some folks would like to admit) company in the entire tech sector by Dow Jones.
Please try to keep up.

You mis-interpreted that press release. It is about sustainable (ie green) investing.
http://www.nampblog.com/2009/09/noki...ndly-tech.html

C.
post #138 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post


You mis-interpreted that press release.

C.


From the press release:

"The annual review of the DJSI family is based on a
thorough analysis of corporate economic, environmental and social performance, assessing
issues such as corporate governance, risk management, branding, climate change mitigation,
supply chain standards and labor practices."
post #139 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

From the press release:

"The annual review of the DJSI family is based on a
thorough analysis of corporate economic, environmental and social performance, assessing
issues such as corporate governance, risk management, branding, climate change mitigation,
supply chain standards and labor practices."

One can only hope that the exceptional quality-of-life indicators enjoyed by Nokia's plethora of middle-managers is a source of comfort for them in the period following the downsizing.

C.
post #140 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post

What confounds me about the fandroids is that Apple is somehow doomed as Android becomes more widespread. That's as ridiculous as saying, well, the iPhone 3G was doomed because you had BBerry, Symbian, WindowsMobile, etc, and whatever OS all the major non-smart phones ran on.

Or the mac is somehow doomed at 8% or whatever it is now. iOS is well established and not much will dethrone its mindshare in the near future.
post #141 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

One can only hope that the exceptional quality-of-life indicators enjoyed by Nokia's plethora of middle-managers is a source of comfort for them in the period following the downsizing.

C.

Likely any downsizing will add to the "corporate governance" score.
post #142 of 203
Nokia's biggest problem IMHO is that Symbian^3 isn't all that an inspiring platform to develop for given Nokia's market share, it's inability to execute and because it's still in that crappy unstable phase that all OSs go through near the beginning. iOS, Android, etc all went through this but are largely past it. So it'll be a couple years by the time they get to the equivalent stable state as Android 2.x.

Symbian^4 is going to have a complete revamp of the touch UI and full Qt integration so I expect a large amount of breakage between Symbian^3 and 4.

So really, why bother targeting Symbian as an app dev until Nokia gets its act together. Which may be never at the rate they've been going the last few years.

I suspect that even WP7 will stabilize faster given that one of MS' core strengths is supporting developers.
post #143 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by nht View Post

So it'll be a couple years by the time they get to the equivalent stable state as Android 2.x.

Symbian^4 is going to have a complete revamp of the touch UI and full Qt integration so I expect a large amount of breakage between Symbian^3 and 4.

So really, why bother targeting Symbian as an app dev until Nokia gets its act together. Which may be never at the rate they've been going the last few years.

I suspect that even WP7 will stabilize faster given that one of MS' core strengths is supporting developers.

Hmm. Why would Adroid (a new OS) with 3.x coming up be more stable than a very mature Symbian, which has it's latest evolution (instead of a rewrite) coming up with stuff like GUI acceleration?

Between Symbian ^3 and Symbian ^4 there will be breakage unless you create your apps with Qt. Then your apps should be minimalöy affected by OS differences and compatible with Meego, OSX, Windows and apparently possibly even Android. WP7 on the other hand is a more disruptive change than either Symbian or Android so how would that be the most stable?

Regs, Jarkko
post #144 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

Hmm. Why would Adroid (a new OS) with 3.x coming up be more stable than a very mature Symbian, which has it's latest evolution (instead of a rewrite) coming up with stuff like GUI acceleration?

Between Symbian ^3 and Symbian ^4 there will be breakage unless you create your apps with Qt. Then your apps should be minimalöy affected by OS differences and compatible with Meego, OSX, Windows and apparently possibly even Android. WP7 on the other hand is a more disruptive change than either Symbian or Android so how would that be the most stable?

Regs, Jarkko

I don't think Nokia will pin its future to Symbian (except at the bottom end) Nokia have said - no more Symbian in the N-Series devices.

I can't for the life of me understand why they would continue to develop this problematic platform. Symbian was created by Psion as a small footprint OS - well suited to the handheld devices back in the mid-90s.

At exactly the same time Symbian was running on a Psion organiser, the technology that became the iPhone OS was happily being used to create the World-Wide-Web on the NeXT workstation.

There's no need to develop horribly compromised operating systems to work on handhelds. Even the slowest modern handsets are superior to the workstations of yesteryear.

Nokia's most impressive technology is based on Meego , and I think they should intensify their efforts to make it suitable for the widest possible set of applications.

I am still not convinced that QT is good enough to best Cocoa.

C.
post #145 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

The concept was not new.

Ok, you have just admitted that your original statement was a lie. Thanks.
post #146 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I don't think Nokia will pin its future to Symbian (except at the bottom end) Nokia have said - no more Symbian in the N-Series devices.

Actually Nokia didn't say that, and as their head of Mobile Solutions said

Quote:
There has also been some confusion about Symbian and Nseries. The Nokia N8 will be our only Nseries device on Symbian^3. Of course, we never comment on future products, but a Symbian^4 Nseries device is a strong possibility. A very strong possibility
post #147 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Ok, you have just admitted that your original statement was a lie. Thanks.

What I described was a fundamental change in consumer behaviour in the cellphone market. Not the use of carrier exclusive handsets.

What I actually said is written down in this thread. Please have a go at reading it again. And then retract the above please.

C.
post #148 of 203
Quote:
Of course, we never comment on future products,

Nokia would never pre-announce a product and thereby harm sales of their existing product line.
They'd never pre-announce the N97.
They'd never leak details about the N900 seven months prior to launch.
Or go on an international sales drive to pre-announce the N8

Perhaps if Nokia stopped vigorously competing with itself it might be in a slightly better shape.

C.
post #149 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

What I described was a fundamental change in consumer behaviour in the cellphone market. Not the use of carrier exclusive handsets.

What I actually said is written down in this thread. Please have a go at reading it again. And then retract the above please.

C.

Why would I retract it, you made this claim

Quote:

It's the choices of consumers that now drives the market. Not the choices forced on consumers by carriers.

More precisely...
Pre iPhone, select a carrier, then select a device offered.
Post iPhone, select device, then pick carrier.

And it is incorrect. I stand by the fact that your statement is wrong.
post #150 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Nokia would never pre-announce a product and thereby harm sales of their existing product line.

Why did you side step the bit where you were wrong again?
post #151 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

Hmm. Why would Adroid (a new OS) with 3.x coming up be more stable than a very mature Symbian, which has it's latest evolution (instead of a rewrite) coming up with stuff like GUI acceleration?

Symbian^3 is mostly S60v5 with some touch/UI extensions and a 1st cut at Qt integration. Somewhat half baked and only charitably equivalent to say Android 1.0. Symbian^4 is revamping the touch interface.

Quote:
Between Symbian ^3 and Symbian ^4 there will be breakage unless you create your apps with Qt. Then your apps should be minimalöy affected by OS differences and compatible with Meego, OSX, Windows and apparently possibly even Android. WP7 on the other hand is a more disruptive change than either Symbian or Android so how would that be the most stable?

Because MS dev tools don't suck and they know how to build robust APIs?

Qt Quick seems better than Android XML UI layout which isn't hard given that Relative Layout is like some unholy spawn of GridBagLayout and XML. But Qt Mobility (access to the phone features like dialing, contacts, camera, etc) is still a moving target despite the 1.0 moniker. If I recall correctly it's still part of the beta SDK. Coding against the mobile extensions preview is like coding against pre-release Android. Useful to learn but expect a lot of breakage when S^4 comes out when it becomes mandatory.

At this point in time, I would think that the only devs really hammering away at S^3 development are existing Symbian devs and folks who really really want to code Qt on phones. Which isn't all THAT many.

That Qt is somewhat cross platform is mostly uninteresting. You can claim the same of Java and .NET but it doesn't matter that much unless you have an application you want to port from the desktop to a mobile platform.

WP7 SDKs are based on the solid foundations of other MS technologies like XNA and WPF just like iOS SDKs are based on solid foundations of other Apple technologies like the Core libraries.
post #152 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I don't think Nokia will pin its future to Symbian (except at the bottom end) Nokia have said - no more Symbian in the N-Series devices.

Neither do I in the high end phone sector. They'll go Meego. In the low and mid-level they propably will stick to Symbian. The only things that Symbian lags behind Android is the UI and Dev environment. On others it's way ahead (power management, GPU acceleration, multitasking etc). UI is being revamped in ^4 and Dev environment is changing right now to Qt.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I am still not convinced that QT is good enough to best Cocoa.

That's just it. The commentary on Qt is extremely favourable. The transfer of Angry Birds for example from Cocoa to Qt (Beta at that stage) took three weeks. Can't be all that bad. And the Maemo version of Angry Birds is said to be better than iPhones (mainly due to resolution though).

I've said it before. There are a lot of very favourable comments on current Qt. App developers will come once the largest number of phones out there support Qt (remember Nokia's market share). Even if Nokia's market share dips dramatically, Qt-capable device deployment will be huge.

Add the Meego, Symbian, Android cross-platform to it (no need for desktop to complicate the discussion), there will be developers.

The thing really missing is a non-biased developer, who has written for both Qt and Cocoa to give their honest opinion. The would clear some stuff for me. I'm no developer so I can't really judge. I just want to understand the landscape better.

Regs, Jarkko
post #153 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


And it is incorrect. I stand by the fact that your statement is wrong.

Let's get this right.
1. Read something
2. Mis understand it completely
3. Call the writer a liar
4. Refuse to apologize.

How fortunate is this forum to have your contribution.

C.
post #154 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

Why did you side step the bit where you were wrong again?

The point of this debate is to illustrate what monumentally incompetent decisions led to the demise of Nokia.
The utterly laughable statement you quoted, about never taling about future products, was the clearest possible illustration of just how bizarrely full of bullshit the Nokia management are. The record shows a long history of Nokia sabotaging existing product sales by pre announcing forthcoming products.

On your point.

I don't think we will ever see a Symbian 4 N-Series phone because the pursuit of two competing OS technologies is one of the reasons that Nokias product development has been so slow compared to others.

If we ever see such a thing, I'll happily admit I was wrong. Perhaps we will know in 3 or 4 years. But personally I don't think Nokia are that dumb.

What that are is embarrassed to admit that Symbian is a about to be relegated to the second tier.

C.
post #155 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Let's get this right.

Ok, let's get this right. For some reason you have such a hatred for Nokia that you can't even see when you have made an arse of yourself.

Has this hatred made you blind to that fact that you made a claim that you can't even acknowledge you made? Have you forgotten the fact it is still sitting in this thread for everyone to read.

You made a claim, a claim that was false, now you are trying to walk your way out of it.

Get over yourself.
post #156 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

That's just it. The commentary on Qt is extremely favourable. The transfer of Angry Birds for example from Cocoa to Qt (Beta at that stage) took three weeks. Can't be all that bad. And the Maemo version of Angry Birds is said to be better than iPhones (mainly due to resolution though).

At most, a product like Angry Birds should be 3 man months to develop from scratch. 1-2 weeks porting time to another platform would be reasonable. Three seems a bit long. I don't think that number suggests that QT is anything special.

I'd argue that a non-game product might be a better one to study.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

I've said it before. There are a lot of very favourable comments on current Qt. App developers will come once the largest number of phones out there support Qt (remember Nokia's market share). Even if Nokia's market share dips dramatically, Qt-capable device deployment will be huge.

Certainly solving the mess of incompatibility and fragmentation is a smart move for Nokia. But remember that a cross-plaform API does not magically solve that. To create great apps, a developer has to invest effort in each form-factor. A resistive screen qwertyphone needs different handling to a large screen capacitive display. Nokia's fragmented OSes are a problem that could be solved by QT. Nokia's huge number of SKUs and form-factors can not.

Cocoa isn't like this. Instead it provides robust flexible models for creating typical applications. It provides solutions for presenting information, manipulating data, saving and loading. It's all there and it's really very simple to exploit.

This leaves the programmer to focus entirely on customisation and experience. QT seems so solve a different problem.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jahonen View Post

The thing really missing is a non-biased developer, who has written for both Qt and Cocoa to give their honest opinion.

(GRIN) That seems unlikely. There seems to be a near-religious schism between the two. I recently went to a mobile developer conference. The commercial message was quite clear. Right now the most profitable platform to develop for was iOS. I talked to a bunch of Symbian developers and asked them if they were going to switch platform. It seems they would rather chew razor-blades than learn Cocoa.

I have just taken up full-time iOS development. I'd happily learn QT if it appeared commercially viable. But at the moment the numbers don't work out. In terms of developer revenues the iPhone seems to be five or six times ahead of Android, and the Nokia platform is well behind that.

I'd respectfully suggest that if Nokia..
Completes Meego so that it is complete and awesomely great.
Get QT working effectively
Culls 70% of it's product lines
Successfully integrates a GPU into all devices (and into the OS)
Overhauls its development tools..

Then it might finally have a platform that is the technical peer of Android, WebOS, WP7 and iOS.
But that's a lot of ifs. It would still have a commercial mountain to climb.

C.
post #157 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

The point of this debate is to illustrate what monumentally incompetent decisions led to the demise of Nokia.

No, the point of this debate is you are making false claims, and are trying to back track out of them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

The utterly laughable statement you quoted, about never taling about future products, was the clearest possible illustration of just how bizarrely full of bullshit the Nokia management are. The record shows a long history of Nokia sabotaging existing product sales by pre announcing forthcoming products.

Let's see, you made a claim regarding Nokia not making any more Symbian based N series devices. Where is your proof of this claim? I posted something that proves you claim was wrong, but your hatred means you will ignore this. Says alot about you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

I don't think we will ever see a Symbian 4 N-Series phone because the pursuit of two competing OS technologies is one of the reasons that Nokias product development has been so slow compared to others.

That is your thought, you are welcome to have your own thoughts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

If we ever see such a thing, I'll happily admit I was wrong. Perhaps we will know in 3 or 4 years. But personally I don't think Nokia are that dumb.

No you won't, you have been proved wrong in the past, you will just ignore the fact.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

What that are is embarrassed to admit that Symbian is a about to be relegated to the second tier.

you will have to repeat this one, as I don't know what "what that are is" means. If you mean that I am embarrassed about Symbian.... Then no, I wouldn't embarrassed one bit, that would like saying my Macs are second teir as they account for under 5% of the worlds computers
post #158 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

You made a claim, a claim that was false, now you are trying to walk your way out of it.
.

Which claim did I make which is false. Please explain?

I honestly don't hate Nokia. I hate the fact that a once-brilliant world-beating European company has been flushed down the toilet by the most idiotic and incompetent leadership I have ever seen.

Here's my argument - in short "facty" sentences so that you can understand it without getting all confused again.

1) iPhone was released a little over three years ago by a company with zero experience of handset manufacture or design.
2) Nokia, world leader in handsets, dismissed it and failed to respond in any way.
3) iPhone triggered a sea change in the way consumers behaved, triggering subscribers to switch networks in order to get the device.
4) The willingness for consumers to drop their carriers, was a blow to Nokia, because their real strength was in forging commercial ties with carriers (not with consumers)
5) Google and Palm recognised this change in consumer habits and quickly responded with products.
6) Nokia did nothing, apart from repeatedly undermining current products, with pre-announcements of "better ones"
7) Sales of Nokia's N-series devices collapsed. Leaving a smartphone portfolio with lower price points and weaker profitability.
8) After just two years, Apple became the worlds most profitable handset maker. Passing Nokia.
9) After three years Apple captures some 45 of the entire profits in the entire cellphone industry.
10) Nokia are widely criticised for their failure to respond to this change in the market. Specifically in their failure to create compelling products that rival Android and iPhone devices.
11) They hire a manager. (not a product guy)

I thank you for this opportunity to clarify this argument.

C.

Hint . if you sound out the words - you might do better at understanding their meaning.
post #159 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by jfanning View Post

you will have to repeat this one, as I don't know what "what that are is" means.

Apologies. Mis-typed without my glasses.

Should have said.

"What they are"

Having two competing OS technologies is two more than most cellphone companies. And one more than the others. Nokia are clearly going to have to dump one of them. They can't do this without upsetting some people.

This is why they issue veiled and mysterious comments about the future of Symbian.

Here's what Jean-Louis Gassee thinks:

http://www.mondaynote.com/2010/09/12/nokia’s-new-ceo-challenges/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaig n=Feed%3A+monday-note+%28Monday+Note%29



C.
post #160 of 203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Which claim did I make which is false. Please explain?

Do you I have tell you for a third time?

This is what you said, and I have correctly you just as many times as I have repeated you...

Quote:
It's the choices of consumers that now drives the market. Not the choices forced on consumers by carriers.

More precisely...
Pre iPhone, select a carrier, then select a device offered.
Post iPhone, select device, then pick carrier.

As I have explained before, prior to the iPhone a consumer could select a device, and select a network, this ability was not a new concept that Apple brought to the table.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Here's my argument - in short "facty" sentences so that you can understand it without getting all confused again.

What's what the insults, I'm not the one with the confusion issue, I think you will find that is you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

1) iPhone was released a little over three years ago by a company with zero experience of handset manufacture or design.

Yes Apple the company didn't have experience, but Apple hired a lot of people that did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

3) iPhone triggered a sea change in the way consumers behaved, triggering subscribers to switch networks in order to get the device.

Like I said, this happened prior to the iPhone, it isn't a new concept.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

11) They hire a manager. (not a product guy)


The fact that Nokia does more than just make handsets seems to be lost on you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carniphage View Post

Hint . if you sound out the words - you might do better at understanding their meaning.

And what are you referring to. If I have made a mistake with a word or a phrase, can you please reference them, otherwise it just appears to be some whinging on your part.
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