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Android users quicker than iPhone users in upgrading to new OS versions - report

post #1 of 130
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Motorola Droid users have a higher adoption rate of Android 2.2 than that of iPhone 3GS users and iOS 4.0, according to a new report.

Mobile app analytics firm Localytics took a look at data from its analytics reports to compare the upgrade rates of two major smartphone upgrades from the summer: Android 2.2 (aka Froyo) on the Motorola Droid and iOS 4.0 on the iPhone 3GS. Android 2.2 for Motorola Droid was released on Aug. 12 and iOS 4.0 was released on June 21.

Based on the data, Localytics concluded that over-the-air upgrades result in a significantly higher upgrade rate. After two weeks, 96 percent of Droid users had upgraded to the new Android OS, while only 56 percent of iPhone 3GS users had upgraded. Even two months after the release of iOS 4.0, just 80 percent of iPhone 3GS users had upgraded.

iPhone users are quicker to upgrade in the first few days, though. Within the first couple days of the iOS 4.0 release, over 30 percent of iPhone 3GS users upgraded. In contrast, it took Android users, who had to wait for OTA Android upgrades to gradually roll out to them, four days to reach a 30 percent upgrade rate.

To Localytics, the lower iPhone 3GS upgrade rate reflects a general shift away from smartphone reliance on PCs/Macs. "Smarter phones and cloud-based services make connecting phones to computers virtually unnecessary," wrote Localytics.



For a comparison of iOS to Android release versus availability, see AppleInsider's coverage of Mobile OS - SDK releases vs User Availability:
post #2 of 130
Yeah but OTA updates also have a higher chance of failing. And therefore bricking the phone. They are also reliant on carriers pushing out the upgrades.

iTunes performs checks that the file downloaded is sound then backs up then performs the upgrade. No backups for OTA. Apple also controls the upgrade so it's entirely up to the user to upgrade. Many hold off until the reports of issues roll in to see if the upgrade is worth it. Also others choose not to upgrade in order to keep their jailbroken phones jailbroken until an update is released.

Sorry but these sorts of data releases mean nothing.
post #3 of 130
Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.
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post #4 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Yeah but OTA updates also have a higher chance of failing. And therefore bricking the phone. They are also reliant on carriers pushing out the upgrades.

iTunes performs checks that the file downloaded is sound then backs up then performs the upgrade. No backups for OTA. Apple also controls the upgrade so it's entirely up to the user to upgrade. Many hold off until the reports of issues roll in to see if the upgrade is worth it. Also others choose not to upgrade in order to keep their jailbroken phones jailbroken until an update is released.

Sorry but these sorts of data releases mean nothing.

I agree that Apples method is done for safety reasons, and it does make a lot of sense, especially since iDevices are designed to be plugged into a PC running iTunes so they can sync.

That said, i think it would benefit the user if these x.x.1 updates that are really just security updates be pushed OTA so users can get them more quickly. Like Security updates for Mac OS X, they would only have to update specific files.

Of course, Apple would have to build in such a mechanism and allow for for fail-safe during the install like on Mac OS X, but I think it could be and should be done as the less and less technically savvy person I know with an iDevice is also one that doesnt listen to music often and therefore doesnt sync their phone unless I remind them to do it.
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post #5 of 130
Maybe it was because Android 2.1 sucked, so users can't wait to get something better?
post #6 of 130
Possible reasons:

1. Android 2.2 brings a very huge improvement over 2.1, pre 2.2 versions suck.

2. iPhone 3G / 3GS with iOS 3.1.3 run very fast.

3. Android users have to wait for a very long time for *announced* software update to 2.2, and many of them simply cannot upgrade to this version, thus increasing the desire for current eligible users to upgrade.

4. Geeky users tend to upgrade at once. There are no doubt more tech geeks in the Android platform than that of iOS.

post #7 of 130
Isn't there more 3GS owners than Droid owners? seems like the upgrade should take longer with more people...plus a lot wait for jailbreak
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post #8 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Maybe it was because Android 2.1 sucked, so users can't wait to get something better?

I believe the survey is of just one Android phone model that was capable of getting v2.2. I think the total percentage of Android phones with v2.2 Froyo is still at around 4.5%, with 35% still using version 1.x, which is pretty sad.

This does bring up a logistical issue with OTA updates for iOS devices. Is it really feasible for Apple to issue worldwide iOS updates for (say) 200,000,000 iOS-based devices come next summer when they move from iOS 4.x to iOS 5.0? Apple has a history of issuing this updates together, and for a full three years, which is a completely different model than the carriers in each country combined with the vendor for each model that have a say and keep their updates few and far between despite the number of new Android activations per day.
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post #9 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.

Agreed. iOS4 made my phone practically unusable
post #10 of 130
What a bizarre comparison - why wasn't adoption of the latest phone compared, so uptake of iOS4 on the iPhone 4? Seems very odd to compare using legacy hardware.
post #11 of 130
Can't blame desperate 'Droid users wanting to upgrade in hope of getting rid of bugs.
post #12 of 130
Maybe, just maybe, OS 4 adoption by iPhone 3GS users MIGHT have been lower because early adopters found that the OS was significantly slower than v3.x was, and that there were some BlueTooth problems.

They just might have held out for v4.1...
post #13 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

What a bizarre comparison - why wasn't adoption of the latest phone compared, so uptake of iOS4 on the iPhone 4? Seems very odd to compare using legacy hardware.

The iPhone 4 does come with iOS 4.0, but you have a point in what phones they were comparing. Obviously a method sucks your bandwidth in the background compared to one you have to actively choose to update whilst connecting to another device is going to slower. I think that after 2 months the 3GS was up to 80% is impressive. I would have thought it to be considerably lower.
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post #14 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

Maybe, just maybe, OS 4 adoption by iPhone 3GS users MIGHT have been lower because early adopters found that the OS was significantly slower than v3.x was, and that there were some BlueTooth problems.

They just might have held out for v4.1...

I dont recall any evidence of that on the 3GS, just the 3G.
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post #15 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.

What a giant pile of BS.
post #16 of 130
If I'm a mobile service provider (which I am) that Android hockeystick graph for OTA updates scares the crap out of me.

That means that within a short period of time I can expect to have a very large number of users downloading some very large files from the same servers at the same time, directly over the wireless network-- instead of the Apple model, where it is downloaded to a PC, presumably from a wired network, then applied to the mobile device.

Aside from that it's not at all clear how they draw their conclusion: that OTA updates cause higher adoption rates.

Isn't it merely possible that a higher percentage of 3GS users are satisfied enough with their device the way it is that they don't need to update? Sure, its' possible that they just sync with a PC or Mac less often, and therefore don't see an upgrade prompt, but that's only one possibility.

It's almost as if the author of the graph had something invested in the idea that all interactions with mobile devices should take place over the air and in real time... hmm...
post #17 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Yeah but OTA updates also have a higher chance of failing. And therefore bricking the phone. They are also reliant on carriers pushing out the upgrades.

iTunes performs checks that the file downloaded is sound then backs up then performs the upgrade. No backups for OTA. Apple also controls the upgrade so it's entirely up to the user to upgrade. Many hold off until the reports of issues roll in to see if the upgrade is worth it. Also others choose not to upgrade in order to keep their jailbroken phones jailbroken until an update is released.

Sorry but these sorts of data releases mean nothing.

I'm pretty sure that Android doesn't actually start applying a firmware update until it is downloaded and verified as well. Most of the OTA update brick reports I've seen are about a version of the firmware which bricks some phones and gets pulled because of that-- not because of the OTA nature of the update. If OTA update failures were that common and ocurred during the update phase, rather than just during download, it's a fair bet the adoption rate would not be as displayed-- it'd be a lot lower.
post #18 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Yeah but OTA updates also have a higher chance of failing. And therefore bricking the phone. They are also reliant on carriers pushing out the upgrades.

iTunes performs checks that the file downloaded is sound then backs up then performs the upgrade. No backups for OTA. Apple also controls the upgrade so it's entirely up to the user to upgrade. Many hold off until the reports of issues roll in to see if the upgrade is worth it. Also others choose not to upgrade in order to keep their jailbroken phones jailbroken until an update is released.

Sorry but these sorts of data releases mean nothing.

well said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Maybe it was because Android 2.1 sucked, so users can't wait to get something better?


Quote:
Originally Posted by haruhiko View Post

Possible reasons:

1. Android 2.2 brings a very huge improvement over 2.1, pre 2.2 versions suck.

2. iPhone 3G / 3GS with iOS 3.1.3 run very fast.

3. Android users have to wait for a very long time for *announced* software update to 2.2, and many of them simply cannot upgrade to this version, thus increasing the desire for current eligible users to upgrade.

4. Geeky users tend to upgrade at once. There are no doubt more tech geeks in the Android platform than that of iOS.


Actually, it made my iphone 3GS faster in my opinion.
post #19 of 130
Yes, yes. Android users are good guys. They are great guys.

(Let the whole bunch of proletariat move on that platform. Us the Apple enthusiasts have enough already of those ``phone owners' '. Yeah... )

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post #20 of 130
I didn't upgrade to 4.0 on my 3GS because I knew that it wasn't really designed for the 3GS. And my concerns were realized when performance issues were reported by upgraders. Don't know if that's a factor, but it was why I refrained from upgrading. And my mom never upgraded her iPod Touch because Apple charged money for the OS updates. So there.

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post #21 of 130
The article is a load of crap.

Why specifically target a specific vendor/phone running Android?

Let's see how the totality of Android users updates compared to iOS users...

Especially since a ton of Android devices are carrier locked/crippled and cannot even update to 2.0, much less 2.2
post #22 of 130
Interesting stats.

But the link to OTA upgrades is spurious at best. There are many differences between the phones. Fixating reclusively on one as the cause for adoption rate? That's just idiotic or disingenuous.
post #23 of 130
The conclusions of this "research" are laughable. The reality is that their wasn't that much of an upgrade needed for iOS users as the previous version was working beautifully and had most of the features and functions that people wanted / needed. The remainder are probably jailbroken phones that make the new OS irrelevant until a new hack is produced. To conclude that this has anything to do with "over the air" updates is pure fantasy. They have no idea what they are talking about. Especially when you consider that when Apple posts an upgrade, it is available to everyone immediately. For Android, its when the carrier gets around to it.
post #24 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatisgoingon View Post

Maybe, just maybe, OS 4 adoption by iPhone 3GS users MIGHT have been lower because early adopters found that the OS was significantly slower than v3.x was, and that there were some BlueTooth problems.

They just might have held out for v4.1...

Fully agree with you. Was dripping to upgrade to iOS4 on my iPhone 3G and then saw the negative echoes and suddenly recalled the LSA 101 : never upgrade an OS unless SP1 is out. So I basically held out until 4.1, which I might actually put on my phone this w/e - not having read any negative reviews so far.

Another reason could be that for the iPhone 3G the list of new features was a rather compact one. For me the only 'killer' thing that they packed into 4.1 is a full AVRCP stack, meaning that I can now fully enjoy the capabilities of my BT headphones...but other than that and the unified inbox the new feature set for the 3G is irrelevant.

IOW why bother...

Oh - one more thing : aren't the Android updates incremental as opposed to the fat deploy used by iOS ? I mean 300-500 MB OTA would make any network melt.....
post #25 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Maybe it was because Android 2.1 sucked, so users can't wait to get something better?

LOL - brilliant.
post #26 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by haruhiko View Post

Possible reasons:

1. Android 2.2 brings a very huge improvement over 2.1, pre 2.2 versions suck.

2. iPhone 3G / 3GS with iOS 3.1.3 run very fast.

3. Android users have to wait for a very long time for *announced* software update to 2.2, and many of them simply cannot upgrade to this version, thus increasing the desire for current eligible users to upgrade.

4. Geeky users tend to upgrade at once. There are no doubt more tech geeks in the Android platform than that of iOS.


5. Motorola Driod users bought their phones knowing that Android 2.2 was just around the corner. They probably had a list of feature updates in mind when they bought the phone. Many iPhone3GS users had owned their phones for a full year when the iOS4 update came out and were already satisfied...

That said, I wouldn't mind OTA updates in the future if it were offered. I just don't know if this article *means* much...
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post #27 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Yeah but OTA updates also have a higher chance of failing. And therefore bricking the phone. They are also reliant on carriers pushing out the upgrades.

iTunes performs checks that the file downloaded is sound then backs up then performs the upgrade. No backups for OTA. Apple also controls the upgrade so it's entirely up to the user to upgrade. Many hold off until the reports of issues roll in to see if the upgrade is worth it. Also others choose not to upgrade in order to keep their jailbroken phones jailbroken until an update is released.

Sorry but these sorts of data releases mean nothing.

great post
i would only add that many iphone owners got them as a gift AND SO their iphones are Just phones to these people .

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post #28 of 130
i agree, it's like saying 4 out of 5 dentists choose Trident or that choosy mothers choose Jif! who frigging cares. find some real news!!!
post #29 of 130
(Retracted. Reason: not to feed them further)
post #30 of 130
(Retracted. Reason: not to feed them further)
post #31 of 130
Isn't Android 2.2 the first Android with Flash? Could be one reason for rapid adoption, although it may be a disappointing experience in reality if web reviews are anything to go by.
post #32 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.

Indeed. Many people refuse to upgrade their iPhone because doing so ruins so many aspects of their phones.
post #33 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Maybe it was because Android 2.1 sucked, so users can't wait to get something better?

Maybe.

Got any support for that as a possibility?
post #34 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Indeed. Many people refuse to upgrade their iPhone because doing so ruins so many aspects of their phones.

Maybe.

Got any support for that as a possibility?


(Newtron/DaHarder -- same-troll marriage?)
post #35 of 130
As an Android owner of a Motorolla Droid (can't use AT&T where I live, so no iPhone), I can tell you why I updated quickly to 2.2 when it was released: because the phone syncs certain things wirelessly and wirelessly only, it pushes its software updates over the air. And I can tell you, when something like 2.2 is available, the message that it is available with the prompt to download keeps coming every couple of minutes until you finally agree to do it. Essentially, they pestered me with it - rendering the phone unusable until I clicked "Install Later" until I finally broke down and installed it within the hour. If I understand correctly, for the iOs, you need to sync the phone to iTunes. If you don't, which many people don't have to do so often, you will not be prompted to upgrade. I almost had no choice if I wanted to be able to use my phone.
post #36 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by dsect View Post

Maybe.

Got any support for that as a possibility?

I'm thinking of jailbroken phones, which are ruined by Apple's updates. I am under the impression that there are many jailbroken phones out there.

I may be incorrect.
post #37 of 130
I guess I can see how in the developing world, where people have no computer and no wired internet connection, OTA updates might be necessary. But for people who have a computer and who have a wired Internet connection, I think a computer-based OS upgrade approach is clearly preferable for both cost and reliability reasons.
post #38 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I didn't upgrade to 4.0 on my 3GS because I knew that it wasn't really designed for the 3GS. And my concerns were realized when performance issues were reported by upgraders. Don't know if that's a factor, but it was why I refrained from upgrading. And my mom never upgraded her iPod Touch because Apple charged money for the OS updates. So there.

Well - you're simply missing out on a great OS - your loss (but needn't be)

(iPhone 3GS, iOS 4.1)
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post #39 of 130
What's the point of this article?

If it was a comparison of all android phone devices vs iPhones - I would see a point.

Besides, with a pushed OTA carrier update, shouldn't that mean all droids are automatically updated regardless of the users actually looking to upgrade or not? I presume the first thing alot of users knew of the 2.2 upgrade is when the phone asks them to confirm the upgrade (kind of like how firefox updates) - or am I wrong?

Sure, iTunes does a period check on an iPhone when syncing, but I know people that go months before syncing their iPhone, and simply charge it from a wall socket beside their beds overnight. My wife wouldn't have a clue about which os her iPhone was running if I didn't upgrade it for her ("why do I have tiny little pictures in boxes on my screen" was the reaction to folders).

Also, a more telling point - a large amount of 3GS users were upgrading to the iPhone 4 at the time of ios 4 release, so I doubt they would have cared much about upgrading their now unused phone in a hurry - this would have pushed the upgrade figure lower:

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles..._upgrades.html
post #40 of 130
My phone is jail-broken and unlocked. I only update when the dev. team oks it.
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