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Android users quicker than iPhone users in upgrading to new OS versions - report - Page 2

post #41 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achiever View Post

As an Android owner of a Motorolla Droid (can't use AT&T where I live, so no iPhone), I can tell you why I updated quickly to 2.2 when it was released: because the phone syncs certain things wirelessly and wirelessly only, it pushes its software updates over the air. And I can tell you, when something like 2.2 is available, the message that it is available with the prompt to download keeps coming every couple of minutes until you finally agree to do it. Essentially, they pestered me with it - rendering the phone unusable until I clicked "Install Later" until I finally broke down and installed it within the hour. If I understand correctly, for the iOs, you need to sync the phone to iTunes. If you don't, which many people don't have to do so often, you will not be prompted to upgrade. I almost had no choice if I wanted to be able to use my phone.

Thanks for sharing. Your comment on syncing is probably quite pertinent.
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post #42 of 130
OK - Maybe I'm reading this graph wrong. The article mentions Android 2.2 was rolled out in stages. I see this reflected in days 0-6 where you see several jumps and plateaus particularly on days 4 and 6. But then on the 7th day it spikes to nearly 100%. Was this just another "stage" of the roll out or did something more significant happen on the 7th day?
post #43 of 130
Thanks for the experience recall Achiever.

It's pretty similar to what I assumed it was like.

OTA updates seem like a good idea in theory (especially for security updates that address critical flaws), but it only takes one bad update to completely trash the validity of the whole process (see Sony vs. PS3 "update" which bricked peoples units).
post #44 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodstains View Post

OK - Maybe I'm reading this graph wrong. The article mentions Android 2.2 was rolled out in stages. I see this reflected in days 0-6 where you see several jumps and plateaus particularly on days 4 and 6. But then on the 7th day it spikes to nearly 100%. Was this just another "stage" of the roll out or did something more significant happen on the 7th day?

And on the seventh day, He rested, so that He could establish that He had a stable cellular connection in a controlled environment, in order that He might download Android 2.2 without concern for the possible bricking of His Droid. And so it was.
post #45 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I believe the survey is of just one Android phone model that was capable of getting v2.2. I think the total percentage of Android phones with v2.2 “Froyo” is still at around 4.5%, with 35% still using version 1.x, which is pretty sad.

Latest stats from developers blog:

post #46 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by haruhiko View Post

Possible reasons:

1. Android 2.2 brings a very huge improvement over 2.1, pre 2.2 versions suck.

2. iPhone 3G / 3GS with iOS 3.1.3 run very fast.

3. Android users have to wait for a very long time for *announced* software update to 2.2, and many of them simply cannot upgrade to this version, thus increasing the desire for current eligible users to upgrade.

4. Geeky users tend to upgrade at once. There are no doubt more tech geeks in the Android platform than that of iOS.


Last point sounds credible at first. But that goes against the Open for all philosophy where all can't be equal to geeks
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post #47 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I didn't upgrade to 4.0 on my 3GS because I knew that it wasn't really designed for the 3GS. And my concerns were realized when performance issues were reported by upgraders. Don't know if that's a factor, but it was why I refrained from upgrading. And my mom never upgraded her iPod Touch because Apple charged money for the OS updates. So there.

As many users have pointed out, the 3GS is MUCH faster with 4.0 than with 3.whatever it was (I already forgot, thats how important it still is). I have a 3G, a 3GS and a 4, and I can say without any qualms that 4.0 only slowed down my 3G, the 3Gs became a little better at not running through my battery like cocaine and was certainly much more useable with the addition of multi-tasking. The 4 obviously only ran on 4.0 and higher, so I can't really compare it to anything.

Also, 4.0 was a free upgrade for the iPod touch as well. Yes, its true they made you pay for both 2 and 3, but if you had decided to read to the articles you would have found out that 4 was free.

So, basically, it sounds like you've been drinking too many negative-nancy's kool-aid rather than listening to Apple. You should try being optimistic about your $700 purchases in the future rather than letting jealous fans of competing products convince you of the"failures" of your own product.
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post #48 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

I didn't upgrade to 4.0 on my 3GS because I knew that it wasn't really designed for the 3GS. And my concerns were realized when performance issues were reported by upgraders. Don't know if that's a factor, but it was why I refrained from upgrading. And my mom never upgraded her iPod Touch because Apple charged money for the OS updates. So there.

There are no performance issues on my 3GS and I don't remember reading about any either.

IOS4 is a great OS.
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post #49 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I believe the survey is of just one Android phone model that was capable of getting v2.2. I think the total percentage of Android phones with v2.2 Froyo is still at around 4.5%, with 35% still using version 1.x, which is pretty sad.

This does bring up a logistical issue with OTA updates for iOS devices. Is it really feasible for Apple to issue worldwide iOS updates for (say) 200,000,000 iOS-based devices come next summer when they move from iOS 4.x to iOS 5.0? Apple has a history of issuing this updates together, and for a full three years, which is a completely different model than the carriers in each country combined with the vendor for each model that have a say and keep their updates few and far between despite the number of new Android activations per day.

Those are some good points....Also speaking for just the US market could AT&Ts network handle just a OTA update? I doubt it.....

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post #50 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddyguido View Post

As many users have pointed out, the 3GS is MUCH faster with 4.0 than with 3.......So, basically, it sounds like you've been drinking too many negative-nancy's kool-aid rather than listening to Apple. You should try being optimistic about your $700 purchases in the future rather than letting jealous fans of competing products convince you of the"failures" of your own product.

My partner and me both have iPhones with a one-year shift between contracts, meaning one of us is eligible to upgrade to a new subsidized iPhone each year. We both like our phones very much but past experience makes us cautious, not optimistic about our "$700" purchases.

The 2G and 3G were both snappy when we bought them. Somehow, they mutated into frustrating snails after several recommended updates. This is a fact, confirmed by many and peaked with the disastrous iOS 4.0 performance on the 3G.

As a result, we do NOT upgrade to a new iOS version when it comes out anymore. We wait until there's enough feedback on-line that the upgrade doesn't take away the reason why we bought iPhones in the first place: smooth, fast, sleek user experience.

Our 3GS has not been updated to iOS4 (but we may soon, given the positive experiences reported on forums) and I waited until a few days ago to update my (launch date) IP4 to iOS4.1, skipping the previous version altogether because I just don't trust Apple with updates anymore. I want my phone to be fast for the whole 2 year contract term.
post #51 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaim2 View Post

Latest stats from developers blog:


Are these users or developers? It makes sense that developers aren't putting their efforts into pre-2.1 applications.
post #52 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Indeed. Many people refuse to upgrade their iPhone because doing so ruins so many aspects of their phones.

They're baaaaaack!

Ugh.

Bye.
post #53 of 130
What is the metric they are measuring? OTA upgrade of iOS 3 to 4? You can only upgrade the phones via desktop connection, correct? What am I misinterpreting?

...morning coffee not set in yet....
post #54 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Are these users or developers? It makes sense that developers aren't putting their efforts into pre-2.1 applications.

Users. It's a pie chart based on every single handset which has accessed the market within a two week period (ending 1st September). Due to the OS' automatic update checking, this covers practically all Android handsets.

Android fragmentation is overblown. It has plenty of other legit problems to attack though.
post #55 of 130
The solution for Apple is simple, open the phone to ALL carriers or as many as possible.
A couple of friends of mine switched to Android on Sprint because the monthly plan prices are HALF of that of ATT, and guess what! They're starting to get used to it and actually like it. De Ja Vu!!
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post #56 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.

Could be that the original OS was slow and sub-par that people are desperate to upgrade.
post #57 of 130
I can't believe the denial in this thread. I am willing to bet good money that if Apple cut the umbilical cord to iTunes and started running OTA updates for iOS devices, the music would change with this audience very quickly and many here would suddenly start defending OTA updates as the only way to do business.

Is there nobody here that can be the slightest bit objective and give credit where it is due?

Smartphones should be stand-alone devices. You should not need a desktop for anything. The moment you do, it's not a stand-alone device anymore and the device becomes something less than 'smart'.

Is Android's OTA system flawless? Of course not. But they deserve credit for developing a system which completely cuts ties to the desktop. Apple can and should follow their lead. If anything it would be easier for Apple, with far fewer devices, to offer OTA updates.
post #58 of 130
Lazy iOS upgraders.
post #59 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Motorola Droid users have a higher adoption rate of Android 2.2 than that of iPhone 3GS users and iOS 4.0, according to a new report.

Mobile app analytics firm Localytics took a look at data from its analytics reports to compare the upgrade rates of two major smartphone upgrades from the summer: Android 2.2 (aka Froyo) on the Motorola Droid and iOS 4.0 on the iPhone 3GS. Android 2.2 for Motorola Droid was released on Aug. 12 and iOS 4.0 was released on June 21.

Based on the data, Localytics concluded that over-the-air upgrades result in a significantly higher upgrade rate. After two weeks, 96 percent of Droid users had upgraded to the new Android OS, while only 56 percent of iPhone 3GS users had upgraded. ....

I call BS. I have read many many reports where previous Android phones running previous releases cannot be upgraded because the carrier is the one who has to revise the custom code in the machines they sell. Because of this, users cannot upgrade even if a newer version of Android is out there.

As indicated in another reply..... many Android machines are STUCK at an earlier version. So where is this information in the data presented.????? Did they only look at the latest Android machines ????

Just curious here.

en
post #60 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Are these users or developers? It makes sense that developers aren't putting their efforts into pre-2.1 applications.

Those stats look to be from developer.android.com, which are legit stats and where I got my previous 4.5% for Froyo and 35% for 1.x stats from just a couple weeks ago. Zaim2 oddly chose not to offer a link or supporting text to explin his post, but I can attest to his overall accuracy.

To me, this shows a rapid adoption of new Android phones running v2.2, which is expected as I would think most of the Android phones being activated in the US are from newer models with Froyo pre-installed. Note that v1.x is still at 30% as of this post, and while Android 2.2 is on a huge rise it’s still at 28.7% and doesn’t seem likely to tackle those v1.x devices until they are stopped being used as I most of them simply aren’t going to get v2.2. I would hope that most running v2.1 will get v2.2 at some point, but there will surely be some stragglers in that bunch when v3.0 arrives.

We also need to ultimately realize that these automatic updates also indicates that about 72% of Android phones current on the market are NOT ABLE TO GET the latest version of Android. And the only way most of these Android users are going to get the latest version of Android is from buying a new Android phone. That is not the user experience I want.


Back to the original topic, OTA has plenty of pros but none of them seem realistic for a large company like Apple that will likely have 200,000,000 iOS devices being ready for iOS 5.0 come next summer. Even if we discount all the WiFi-only devices that is a lot of OTA updates, with the largest single collection by far on AT&T’s network. Now, they could build in a mechanism for manual OTA updates but that is about as likely as include Ogg codecs in QuickTime.

Now a small x.x.1 critical security update I’d love to see, even if it’s just an “In case of fire, break glass” situation. My only concern there would the potential for this service to be highjacked as accessing the root remotely from a server in and of itself is a security risk.
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post #61 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jetz View Post

I can't believe the denial in this thread. I am willing to bet good money that if Apple cut the umbilical cord to iTunes and started running OTA updates for iOS devices, the music would change with this audience very quickly and many here would suddenly start defending OTA updates as the only way to do business.

Is there nobody here that can be the slightest bit objective and give credit where it is due?

Smartphones should be stand-alone devices. You should not need a desktop for anything. The moment you do, it's not a stand-alone device anymore and the device becomes something less than 'smart'.

Is Android's OTA system flawless? Of course not. But they deserve credit for developing a system which completely cuts ties to the desktop. Apple can and should follow their lead. If anything it would be easier for Apple, with far fewer devices, to offer OTA updates.

Youre not thinking through the pros and cons of including such a model. What works for one model often doesnt work for another, and Android OS and iOS (which is only available on iDevices and from one vendor) are very different models.
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post #62 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

Possible Reason:

Android updates tend to be far more extensive/feature-laden than the average iOS update, and they seldom cause more problems than they solve, which isn't always the case with iOS updates of late.

I dont know about that, the 4 update nearly bricked my 3G, and even after 4.1, it still runs like a POS.
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post #63 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by haruhiko View Post

Possible reasons:

1. Android 2.2 brings a very huge improvement over 2.1, pre 2.2 versions suck.

2. iPhone 3G / 3GS with iOS 3.1.3 run very fast.

3. Android users have to wait for a very long time for *announced* software update to 2.2, and many of them simply cannot upgrade to this version, thus increasing the desire for current eligible users to upgrade.

4. Geeky users tend to upgrade at once. There are no doubt more tech geeks in the Android platform than that of iOS.


agree. 3.1 users are probably happy and android users pre-2.2 are not
post #64 of 130
In related news... Android users were found to clip their toenails more frequently than iPhone users. One can draw the conclusion that Android usage must lead to faster toenail growth.
post #65 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achiever View Post

As an Android owner of a Motorolla Droid (can't use AT&T where I live, so no iPhone), I can tell you why I updated quickly to 2.2 when it was released: because the phone syncs certain things wirelessly and wirelessly only, it pushes its software updates over the air. And I can tell you, when something like 2.2 is available, the message that it is available with the prompt to download keeps coming every couple of minutes until you finally agree to do it. Essentially, they pestered me with it - rendering the phone unusable until I clicked "Install Later" until I finally broke down and installed it within the hour. If I understand correctly, for the iOs, you need to sync the phone to iTunes. If you don't, which many people don't have to do so often, you will not be prompted to upgrade. I almost had no choice if I wanted to be able to use my phone.

That's right. I do not regularly synch my iPhone or iPad or iPod. Once I had my basic set of photos and music, I was set to go. When I think about it, I check that I have some unwatched podcasts onboard, or I load up a new movie for the kids to watch when we are in the car.

But the iOS does do OTA updates -- for Mobile Me, email, etc. So, I get my bookmarks, docs, calendar items, to-do's, contacts, mail updated all the time without me thinking about it. Then there are notifications in apps, and things like DropBox and Evernote, etc.... all done OTA without thinking about it.

Plus, even when I finally do sync with iTunes, I am not hassled to upgrade. There is a polite notice on the opening page, but I can carry on checking out all my media sync preferences and adding new stuff and rearranging apps and everything without ever upgrading. No notice pops up in my face, I don't have to dismiss anything to continue.

I upgrade really quickly (like within a couple of hours of release) -- but it is only because I read sites like this one and know it is coming.
post #66 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post

They're baaaaaack!

Ugh.

Bye.


<plonk>
post #67 of 130
. deleted post .
post #68 of 130
Android users scratch their balls more often than iPhone users - report

Do I really care? No.

There are many reasons why android users have upgraded gquicker than iphone users, many of which have been pointed out by other posters.

OTA upgrades work by having a second OS Flash ROM to which new code is loaded, checked and tested before the phone is told to use this ROM and keep the other ROM for the next upgrade.

So OTA upgrades can be completed very safely with no risk of bricking a phone. So the question is why has Apple chosen the iTunes method of upgrading. Multiple reasons probably.

1. Keeps hardware cost of the phones down.
2. iTunes is an easy distribution method for them to manage and track. When I took a 2nd generation iPod Touch in for repair, the guy already knoew I had upgraded to 3.1.
3. They can use their own Content Delivery Network (Akamai) over the internet rather than rely on the carriers.

Probably many more reasons.

I do however feel that iPhone 5 onwards will have OTA upgrades. If you look at how the mobile iTunes is developing, they are gradually adding more and more of the full desktop iTunes into the on-phone version (TV rentals in 4.1 for example), then see they are trying to reduce the need of connecting the phone to pc/mac.

Phil
post #69 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaim2 View Post

Users. It's a pie chart based on every single handset which has accessed the market within a two week period (ending 1st September). Due to the OS' automatic update checking, this covers practically all Android handsets.

Android fragmentation is overblown. It has plenty of other legit problems to attack though.

So it's not users of Android devices. It's users of Android Market. Vast difference.

People using 1.6 won't be connecting to the Android Market if most of the apps aren't compatible, now, will they?

This pie chart therefore says nothing about Android version market share in terms of ownership.
post #70 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudson1 View Post

In related news... Android users were found to clip their toenails more frequently than iPhone users. One can draw the conclusion that Android usage must lead to faster toenail growth.

Now that was the first post on this thread that made any sense....and it was tongue in check!

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post #71 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaim2 View Post

Users. It's a pie chart based on every single handset which has accessed the market within a two week period (ending 1st September). Due to the OS' automatic update checking, this covers practically all Android handsets.

Android fragmentation is overblown. It has plenty of other legit problems to attack though.

Ohhh, "accessed the market", I see. And during a two week period, to boot. And what percentage of Android phones out there actually accessed the market during that two week period?

Apparently, Verizon is releasing Android phones that cannot "access the market". Apparently, Tablets and mobile devices that lack 3G connectivity cannot "access the market". Apparently carriers and handset makers have their own competing "markets". Apparently, Fragmentation is alive and well.

Oh, I get it, Fragmentation doesn't count if we are talking about the whole installed base of Android devices; if we instead narrow ourselves to a portion that are not Soooo ...fragmented, then, voila, no fragmentation; don't you see? We have just defined it out of existence! Hoorah!

I guess the chart is only for the purpose of re-assuring the developers that they can safely target their apps to just a couple of versions of the Android OS; because, of ALL the devices that run Android AND that actually do access the market, the view is not so fragmented (OS-wise; hardware-wise is another matter). But, as for re-assuring the developers that the Android platform is vibrant and profitable? Well, that's another question, because who knows what percentage of Android users are actually accessing the market and regularly downloading commercial apps? Is this a marketplace, or an invitee-only Tupperware party? So, there is a disconnect already between these hundreds of thousands of new activations that are apparently occurring every day, and the number of devices that may or may not "access the market". I hope the developers are hawking their apps on every street corner and are prepared to help unsophisticated users find, download and install their apps using whatever means are necessary to install them.

OTOH, the percentage of iOS devices that cannot access its market is 0% (click the Store button in iTunes and you are in). The percentage of iOS devices that cannot rent or purchase media from said market is 0%. The percentage of iOS devices that cannot download apps from said market because they are on version 1.x, is probably vanishingly small. A developer on iOS knows that what, 90%? of the currently installed base can use his app; and 100% of devices sold the last several quarters and going forward. Welcome to meaningful statistics.
post #72 of 130
Android updates are all done over-the-air, and automatically.

iOS are all done through iTunes, requiring you to plug the phone in, download and sync.
post #73 of 130
Maybe they're thinking, one of these times, the up-grade will make it an iPhone?

Up-grade all they want it's still not going to be an iPhone

Skip
post #74 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by lowededwookie View Post

Yeah but OTA updates also have a higher chance of failing. And therefore bricking the phone. They are also reliant on carriers pushing out the upgrades.

iTunes performs checks that the file downloaded is sound then backs up then performs the upgrade. No backups for OTA. Apple also controls the upgrade so it's entirely up to the user to upgrade. Many hold off until the reports of issues roll in to see if the upgrade is worth it. Also others choose not to upgrade in order to keep their jailbroken phones jailbroken until an update is released.

Sorry but these sorts of data releases mean nothing.

yes there are backups for ota IF one takes the time to do it. kinda like using os x autoupdate 'over the air'. you backup your mac before patching the os or upgrading it? you should cuz it could be 'bricked' too. same for windows.
i think people are just taking a 'apple doesn't use it with the iphone so anyone that does differently is wrong' attitude here.
post #75 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncee View Post

Maybe they're thinking, one of these times, the up-grade will make it an iPhone?

Up-grade all they want it's still not going to be an iPhone

Skip

iphone 4 screen is very nice but that alone is not going to make me ditch android 2.2. 2.2 can do most anything iphone can do and a few things iphone can't do.
post #76 of 130
not sure if anyone said this, but android update are pushed out, verse user of the iphone have to plug into their computer to get their updates. So Android user are prompted to updated their phones over the air.
post #77 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by krabbelen View Post

Ohhh, "accessed the market", I see. And during a two week period, to boot. And what percentage of Android phones actually accessed the market during that two week period?

Apparently, Verizon is releasing Android phones that cannot "access the market". Apparently, Tablets and mobile devices that lack 3G connectivity cannot "access the market". Apparently, Fragmentation is alive and well.

yes, this is the stupidity that is ruining android (not to mention oracle lawsuit lol). all of these moronic companies think they can do 'our own itunes store'. they suck and no one wants to have different stores for every device. thats why i will only stay with android while i can get a developer phone and have plain jane android and android market. when i can't have that i go back to iphone.
post #78 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

2.2 can do most anything iphone can do and a few things iphone can't do.

You're holding it wrong.
post #79 of 130
Quote:
Originally Posted by screamingfist View Post

2.2 can do most anything iphone can do and a few things iphone can't do.

This argument isnt new, but its just as flawed. Smartphone OSes have been able to do what the iPhone can do and much more since day one.

If you are looking for bullet points on a spec sheet then the iPhone isnt for you. Apple solution is to make the features it does offer work easier and more intuitively than other devices. Froyo is not iOS with CocoaTouch. Not even close.
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post #80 of 130
From my personal experience, this is very easy to understand. The low initial adoption rate for Android OTA is because the carrier push out the update on their schedule, not the user's. So it doesn't matter how much you want the update, you'll get it only when the carrier decide it's your turn. When it's your turn, the OTA update process always bugs you that you have an update ready, at least every time you restart your phone. Eventually, people who doesn't even want it gets tired of the reminder and accept the update. Hence the late jump in adoption rate.
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