or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Police interviewed Steve Jobs in iPhone prototype case
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Police interviewed Steve Jobs in iPhone prototype case

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
California authorities are close to wrapping up their investigation of the case involving the iPhone 4 prototype obtained by Gizmodo in April. Apple chief executive Steve Jobs was interviewed during the investigation.

Stephen Wagstaffe, chief deputy district attorney for San Mateo County, Calif., told CNET Monday that police are nearly finished with their investigation, Greg Sandoval reports. A final report could be sent to Wagstaffe "within the next few weeks."

"Wagstaffe will then review the information and determine whether to file criminal charges," the report noted. According to the district attorney, a "number of Apple employees," including Jobs, and "people connected to the case" were interviewed during the investigation.

The saga began in March when Brian Hogan reportedly "found" an iPhone left by an Apple engineer in a Redwood City, Calif., bar. After removing a false case meant to simulate the appearance of the iPhone 3GS, Hogan realized the phone was a nearly-finished prototype of the then unannounced iPhone 4. Hogan then reportedly sold Gizmodo the "exclusive rights" to review the prototype for $5,000.

Although Engadget posted the first photos of the prototype, it was Gizmodo's Jason Chen that eventually broke the story with a hands-on video of the device.

An unsealed court affidavit later revealed that Gizmodo had been quickly contacted by Jobs to request the return of the device. According to accounts documenting the phone call and emails between Jobs and Gizmodo editor Brian Lam, Lam agreed to return the prototype "on the condition that Apple provided him with a letter stating the iPhone belonged to Apple."

Gizmodo was then contacted by Apple's legal counsel formally requesting the return of the device. A subsequent police investigation resulted in a raid on Chen's home by a computer task force that confiscated several of Chen's computers and phones.

After the seizure, a lawyer for Gizmodo hinted that the website might sue authorities for the search, which was a "contravention of process." The police initially held off on analyzing data on Chen's devices until June, CNET reported.

Responding to attempts by the media to obtain court records, prosecutors argued that the search warrant affidavit should remain sealed to protect the "informant's" identity. It was later revealed that Hogan's roommate had contacted Apple Security and police "in order to absolve herself of criminal responsibility." The roommate notified police when Hogan and an associate attempted to dispose of evidence related to the case.

When questioned about the incident at the D8 conference in June, Jobs became heated, questioning whether Chen could be considered a journalist and described the "story" as having "theft," "stolen property" and "extortion."

In July, Wagstaffe again told CNET that Chen and authorities had reached an agreement to "drop attempts to search Chen's property" as Chen cooperated by providing requested information.
post #2 of 39
Oh boy here we go again....
In other news Neil Armstrong has walked on the moon.
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster by your side, kid.
Reply
post #3 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

Oh boy here we go again....
In other news Neil Armstrong has walked on the moon.

I know, right?

I mean, do people really believe this is news? Of course the police interviewed the CEO of a victim company in a borderline corporate espionage case.
post #4 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

Oh boy here we go again....
In other news Neil Armstrong has walked on the moon.

"no way!" "We landed on the moon!!"
post #5 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

In other news Neil Armstrong has walked on the moon.

*allegedly*
post #6 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

Oh boy here we go again....
In other news Neil Armstrong has walked on the moon.

Fake!

It was filmed in a hangar at NTTR. I know I was there. I was the cameraman.
post #7 of 39
The headline for this story shoud have been:

Police interviewed Steve Jobs in Gizmodo theft case

It would have gotten many more hits.
post #8 of 39
Like he'd know anything about the situation... it happened way too low down on the food chain for him to have even have been involved until well after the fact.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
post #9 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

The headline for this story shoud have been:

Police interviewed Steve Jobs in Gizmodo theft case

It would have gotten many more hits.

... and been a Huge Lie.
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
"Why iPhone"... Hmmm?
Reply
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post

... and been a Huge Lie.

Since when do blogs have to tell the truth? Just look at Gizmodo!!
post #11 of 39
I think the whole thing was blown WAY out of proportion, and police were over-reaching their bounds and what people deem as appropriate.
post #12 of 39
Once the identity of the true owner was confirmed the item needed to be returned to the owner. That is cut and dry.

The way the prototype went missing and what happened to it in between then and when it was returned might be really interesting regarding corporate espionage.

If Lam and Gizmodo didn't have money they would be toast just like anybody else. Anyone dealing with police who doesn't have plenty of money or powerful friends inevitably gets burned.
post #13 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

I think the whole thing was blown WAY out of proportion, and police were over-reaching their bounds and what people deem as appropriate.

If you had your phone stolen and you knew where it was, would you want the cops to bust down somebody's door? I would. And this prototype was worth a hell of a lot more than the 200 bucks I spent on my last phone.
post #14 of 39
Gosh what a shock!
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
Reply
Enjoying the new Mac Pro ... it's smokin'
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini.
Reply
post #15 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by boeyc15 View Post

Oh boy here we go again....
In other news Neil Armstrong has walked on the moon.

You need to rehash everything leading up to that sentence to be worthy of posting on AI. Say something like "The saga began when the Soviets launched Sputnik..."

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply

"Apple should pull the plug on the iPhone."

John C. Dvorak, 2007
Reply
post #16 of 39
I'm not sure how Jason Chen was treated by the police, and whether it was appropriate, but he did not only ask for confirmation that the prototype was Apple's, he did attempt extortion by saying in the unsealed email to Steve that he would give it back if he was "more in the loop" or having "advanced information" on Apple stuff (I'm paraphrasing here, you can Google the actual words of the email he sent).
post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaHarder;

... and been a Huge Lie.

What's a lie? Which part exactly are you referring to?
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton;

"The saga began when the Soviets launched Sputnik..."

*allegedly*
post #19 of 39
The totality of Gizmodo should go to jail for bad writing.
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


When questioned about the incident at the D8 conference in June, Jobs became heated, questioning whether Chen could be considered a journalist and described the "story" as having "theft," "stolen property" and "extortion."

In July, Wagstaffe again told CNET that Chen and authorities had reached an agreement to "drop attempts to search Chen's property" as Chen cooperated by providing requested information.

These last comments just make Steve Jobs and Apple look like douche bags.

Steve, Droid has your Market Share. Lose the Turtle neck and get a ski seater, it will make you look healthier.
post #21 of 39
Thought they would have settled this by now.
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
--SHEFFmachine out
Da Bears!
Reply
post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

I think the whole thing was blown WAY out of proportion, and police were over-reaching their bounds and what people deem as appropriate.

What is appropriate and what people deem to be appropriate are not always the same thing .... especially in this day and age.
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
Reply
See, in the record business, you can show someone your song, and they don’t copy it. In the tech business, you show somebody your idea, and they steal it. (Jimmy Iovine)
Reply
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyforall View Post

I think the whole thing was blown WAY out of proportion, and police were over-reaching their bounds and what people deem as appropriate.

California state law deems it theft if you find something and don't make a valid attempt to return it. Walking out of that bar with a phone that was not his and then, despite claiming to have the owners facebook account info, not contacting the owner, is refusing to make an attempt. Plus they have the roommate's statement that Hogan basically said "tough cookies, I've got a free iphone"

Gizmodo took possession of said item and paid for it. Thus purchase of stolen property comes into play. ANd they admitted they had it and they paid an amount that made it a felony.

The police were within their rights. They never asked Chen to reveal any sources, thus shield laws aren't applicable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

Thought they would have settled this by now.

This isn't some civil suit. It is criminal. the Cali DA, not Apple, is the big dog. ANd given how much technology is a big business in California, I don't see them just brushing off this kind of deal.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
post #24 of 39
Send 'em dahn...
post #25 of 39
The title should be changed to "Who Wants the Gizmodo Clown to go to Jail?"

Mega, mega hits.

And the day after he's put in the slammer, "Jason Chen Experiences a Whole New Kind of 'FaceTime'."

I think I got banned from Gizmodo for saying something like that. Or maybe it was something else. Whatev.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

The police raid was probably ordered by Steve Jobs. He no doubt owns the police.

No, it's the Freemasons. They control everything. Didn't you watch National Treasure?
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post

And the day after he's put in the slammer, "Jason Chen Experiences a Whole New Kind of 'FaceTime'."

Ouch. \
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MenLoveToys View Post

Steve, Droid has your Market Share...

Good, I hope Android does even better and more people buy it, that will improve iPad and iPhone 4 availability around the world.
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadash View Post

If you had your phone stolen and you knew where it was, would you want the cops to bust down somebody's door? I would. And this prototype was worth a hell of a lot more than the 200 bucks I spent on my last phone.

The door was busted down long after Apple had their phone returned. Sorry to bring up facts. They can get in the way of a good rant.
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackintosh View Post

The police raid was probably ordered by Steve Jobs. He no doubt owns the police.

Sometimes the truth is even stranger than sarcasm.

The cops were part of a special task force funded largely by Apple.
post #31 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

California state law deems it theft if you find something and don't make a valid attempt to return it. Walking out of that bar with a phone that was not his and then, despite claiming to have the owners facebook account info, not contacting the owner, is refusing to make an attempt. Plus they have the roommate's statement that Hogan basically said "tough cookies, I've got a free iphone"

Gizmodo took possession of said item and paid for it. Thus purchase of stolen property comes into play. ANd they admitted they had it and they paid an amount that made it a felony.

The police were within their rights. They never asked Chen to reveal any sources, thus shield laws aren't applicable.

Don't forget the extortion attempts. Actually, not only have the police not abused their powers in any way (as implied by the op) they've bent over backwards not to "violate" rights Chen doesn't even have. California apparently needs to clarify its shield law to make sure that claiming to be a journalist doesn't become a license to tie the cops hands when committing various felonies.
post #32 of 39
I wonder if the antenna was giving Chen problems too.
post #33 of 39
$$ profit $$
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbee View Post

What is appropriate and what people deem to be appropriate are not always the same thing .... especially in this day and age.

That's a two way street. Why is what you deem to be appropriate more correct than what he did?
The key to enjoying these forums: User CP -> Edit Ignore List
Reply
The key to enjoying these forums: User CP -> Edit Ignore List
Reply
post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Sometimes the truth is even stranger than sarcasm.

The cops were part of a special task force funded largely by Apple.

Ummm. No. You lie, like the rug on the floor.

EVERY Silicon Valley company is invited to participate in meetings of the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team (REACT) Advisory Committee. It is how the local police gain insight into how to do forensics and treat counterfeiting, illegal hacking and high-tech industrial espionage cases amongst other Silicon Valley flavored crime issues. No company controls it, it works for and is totally funded by the District Attorney.

This has been hashed out at length previously in the open press and here on the boards.
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron;

Sometimes the truth is even stranger than sarcasm.

The cops were part of a special task force funded largely by Apple.

Ah, dipping into conspiracy theory land, I see... As for myself, I fear Google watches me undress at night.
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Although Engadget posted the first photos of the prototype...

Really? And AppleOutsider got some proof for that? Bullshit, then?

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivan.rnn01 View Post

Really? And AppleOutsider got some proof for that? Bullshit, then?

Are you trying to be an ignorant tool?

It is open and easily verified knowledge that Engadget posted some pics of an iPhone 4g prototype from overseas a couple days before the whole Gizmodo thing blew up.

The entire frakking intarwebs be the proof. Try a pair of searches on "Engadget iphone 4" & "Gizmodo iphone 4" and compare the dates, then go back and think before you post BS when you are on the wrong end of the bull.
.
Reply
.
Reply
post #39 of 39
Scum is not worth paying attention... Still, it's now acknowledged by Engadget itself, that the first iPhone 4 pictures ever surfaced the web on Feb 20th/21st 2010, while Engadget posted theirs on Apr 17th.
Just another load of bullshit from AppleOutsider.

P.S. Why don't you noobs just STFU? The board is unreadable because of your endless brainless trolling...
STFU, go troll on your ubuntu forums, go to hell, I tell you...

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply

We mean Apple no harm.

People are lovers, basically. -- Engadget livebloggers at the iPad mini event.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Police interviewed Steve Jobs in iPhone prototype case