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post #121 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by thompr View Post

You should visit this link everyday: http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=AAPL

not necessarily to track the stock information, but for the headlines that appear below. There have been many significant articles recently about the iPhone's encroachment in the enterprise. Those headlines change hourly, and there's nothing apropos there right now. You can seek back through history, if you had the time or inkling, or you could just trust me.

And from a first-hand standpoint, my current employer, SAIC, just approved iPhone 4 for work use. My colleagues are swarming.

Thompson

I'll take a look.
post #122 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

I'll take a look.

Just for kicks, I checked there right now, and one of the mentioned articles is there. Link:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/39306303?__so...t%7C&par=yahoo


Thompson
post #123 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

.

For those of us that follow such things, another couple of milestones have been reached-- one earlier today.

AAPL surpasses MSFT market value by $50 Billion.

AAPL market value is 1,135% of DELL market value.

... maybe Apple should take part of that $42 Billion cash, buy Dell, liquidate it, and pay off the shareholders.



.

Fabulous news, thanks for the historic update info. What an amazing story for those of us who have followed Apple from the beginning.

I'd just let Dell and shareholders go down the drain though
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
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post #124 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

Yes, MS’ cap was over double what it is now, but remember that was all false inflation from the dotCom boom that made it so. What those graphs are really showing are a steady and consistence climb for Apple and stagnation for MS (when you factor in extra-market affects on those companies.

If Apple had nothing but vapourware with lofty promises and/or a huge E/P then I would fear that Apple’s growth bubble will pop, but as shareholders we know that their E/P isn’t egregious, that their earnings back up their growth rate, and that aren’t likely to even acknowledge a product’s existence until it’s almost ready to ship (or at least the contracts for components and manufacturing have been inked, even if there are occasional hiccups). Take Palm, for example, I wish I would have bought them for the short term when they announced WebOS. They jumped 14x in about 5-6 months, but that dropped after they couldn’t deliver on actual sales and profit.

PS: MS’ still makes more profit than Apple, and as of the last earnings made slightly more revenue. That isn’t to last long based on current trends, but I would not count MS out when they have so much control and profit to make a huge comeback if they get their internal structure and management issues resolved. They may be a slow and inefficient giant, but it will take a lot to bring down this giant. At this point MS is more immobilized* than hurt.

* Pun intended in referring to their inability to be dominate on smartphones and tablets.

When I worked for IBM (1964-1980) they were the unassailable 800 lb gorilla. Big Blue had 97% of the mainframe computer market. In the mid 1970s, DEC, Data General and a few other minicomputers began to challenge IBM's dominance. They still had 97% of mainframes and IBM even introduced some minicomputer class systems of their own.

But the market emphasis had shifted (for lots of reasons) from mainframes to minis.

Personal computers (called microcomputers) were around then, but some technology converged around 1978-9 that shifted the focus once again. That convergence was three things: the Apple ][, Floppy Drives and VisiCalc.

I still worked for IBM, but, with 2 others, had opened a computer store in 1978. One of my partners was a known expert on the Apple ][-- and he was asked to beta test VisiCalc.

Zap!

When that package hit the market it said: I'm here! I'm serious! I can do the job (your work)! I can get it done, NOW!

It helped that a solution like this cost $3,000 or less, but the driving factor was geting it done, NOW!

The typical backlog to get the Data Processing Department to implement an application for an enterprise department was 18 months or longer. The manager of an evolving department (or a new product) could not afford to wait that long for the information he needed-- it was perishable.

So, typically, a couple of smart people in the department would slap together a few quick spreadsheets and voila-- you had a budget, a payroll or product forecast.

So these department managers said: $3,000 and some part time effort vs major $ and 18-month wait...

Data Processing? Data Processing? I don't need no stinkin' Data Processing!


And they didn't. The emphasis had shifted again, and with it went the emphasis on the mainframe and the mini.


We were in the middle of Silicon Valley, selling this "solution" to all the Fortune 500s (IBM, Fairchild, Xerox, Applied Materials, Marriott, Intel, ADP....).

We were part of it, but didn't really recognize what was happening.




So, why am I going on about this?



I'll tell you why!


with the iPhone and the iPad * the emphasis has shifted again!
* (and all those that follow in their footsteps)


Floortops, Desktops, laptops aren't going to go away (we still have mainframes). But their halcyon days are gone -- they are today's legacy systems.


I can carry most of what [information] I need in my pocket or in my hand and have instantaneous access. The stuff I don't have with me, I can pull out of the air! I don't need to spend a lot of money, and I don't need any special training or preparation!


Legacy Computers? Legacy Computers? I don't need no stinkin' Legacy Computers!



... maybe a little premature-- but it's happening!

.
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post #125 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sacto Joe View Post

It's even more impressive when you realize that, unlike the Microsoft chart, the Apple chart is a logarithmic scale.

Both charts are logarithmic, it just shows more clearly on the AAPL chart due to the larger vertical scale.
Please don't be insane.
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post #126 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

When I worked for IBM (1964-1980) they were the unassailable 800 lb gorilla. Big Blue had 97% of the mainframe computer market. In the mid 1970s, DEC, Data General and a few other minicomputers began to challenge IBM's dominance. They still had 97% of mainframes and IBM even introduced some minicomputer class systems of their own.

But the market emphasis had shifted (for lots of reasons) from mainframes to minis.

Personal computers (called microcomputers) were around then, but some technology converged around 1978-9 that shifted the focus once again. That convergence was three things: the Apple ][, Floppy Drives and VisiCalc.

I still worked for IBM, but, with 2 others, had opened a computer store in 1978. One of my partners was a known expert on the Apple ][-- and he was asked to beta test VisiCalc.

Zap!

When that package hit the market it said: I'm here! I'm serious! I can do the job (your work)! I can get it done, NOW!

It helped that a solution like this cost $3,000 or less, but the driving factor was geting it done, NOW!

The typical backlog to get the Data Processing Department to implement an application for an enterprise department was 18 months or longer. The manager of an evolving department (or a new product) could not afford to wait that long for the information he needed-- it was perishable.

So, typically, a couple of smart people in the department would slap together a few quick spreadsheets and voila-- you had a budget, a payroll or product forecast.

So these department managers said: $3,000 and some part time effort vs major $ and 18-month wait...

Data Processing? Data Processing? I don't need no stinkin' Data Processing!


And they didn't. The emphasis had shifted again, and with it went the emphasis on the mainframe and the mini.


We were in the middle of Silicon Valley, selling this "solution" to all the Fortune 500s (IBM, Fairchild, Xerox, Applied Materials, Marriott, Intel, ADP....).

We were part of it, but didn't really recognize what was happening.




So, why am I going on about this?



I'll tell you why!


with the iPhone and the iPad * the emphasis has shifted again!
* (and all those that follow in their footsteps)


Floortops, Desktops, laptops aren't going to go away (we still have mainframes). But their halcyon days are gone -- they are today's legacy systems.


I can carry most of what [information] I need in my pocket or in my hand and have instantaneous access. The stuff I don't have with me, I can pull out of the air! I don't need to spend a lot of money, and I don't need any special training or preparation!


Legacy Computers? Legacy Computers? I don't need no stinkin' Legacy Computers!



... maybe a little premature-- but it's happening!

.

I am so on the same page as you!

BTW: I gave up my job and I too opened an Apple store in 1978 after demoing an Apple ][ with Visicalc to my dad.

The demo was a shock to him. He had a massive main frame department at his company and had to wait days if not weeks to get answers to 'what ifs' in production (chemical plant). He opened his briefcase and took out some papers and read me numbers and formulae which I fed in to a spread sheet. I hit the button and he stared at the screen then he said change this and that and I pressed again and he said ... "Bloody Hell!".

He loaned me the money
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #127 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

When I worked for IBM (1964-1980) they were the unassailable 800 lb gorilla. Big Blue had 97% of the mainframe computer market. In the mid 1970s, DEC, Data General and a few other minicomputers began to challenge IBM's dominance. They still had 97% of mainframes and IBM even introduced some minicomputer class systems of their own.

And speaking of the mainframe market, Ross Perot had the savvy idea, to put it simply, of renting time on these mainframes where he would lease out the time to smaller companies that could afford having their own machine and likely only needed periodic access. With this huge fortune he amassed he ended up being a large investor in NeXT.




Disclaimer: That is how I remember it but my memory is subject to more errors than Wikipedia baba booey baba booey
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #128 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

And speaking of the mainframe market, Ross Perot had the savvy idea, to put it simply, of renting time on these mainframes where he would lease out the time to smaller companies that could afford having their own machine and likely only needed periodic access. With this huge fortune he amassed he ended up being a large investor in NeXT.




Disclaimer: That is how I remember it but my memory is subject to more errors than Wikipedia baba booey baba booey


Pretty much right on!

Rumor at IBM was that as a freshman salesman, Ross made 200% of his annual quota in his first month on the job and first sale. Ross' company, EDS, did a lot of work for General Motors. GM bought EDS and with it, got Ross as a major shareholder. He pissed everyone off, so they paid him off. AIR, he eventually bought EDS back for pennies on the dollar.

.
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post #129 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I am so on the same page as you!

BTW: I gave up my job and I too opened an Apple store in 1978 after demoing an Apple ][ with Visicalc to my dad.

The demo was a shock to him. He had a massive main frame department at his company and had to wait days if not weeks to get answers to 'what ifs' in production (chemical plant). He opened his briefcase and took out some papers and read me numbers and formulae which I fed in to a spread sheet. I hit the button and he stared at the screen then he said change this and that and I pressed again and he said ... "Bloody Hell!".

He loaned me the money


Exactly! I bet you could just see the wheels turning in his mind...


Then, they would ask:

How much does that program cost?

$79.

A month?

No, $79 total!


You reel that one in, and I'll go catch another!



Here's a picture of magic circa 1978:



On a 24 line, 40 column monochrome screen (uppercase only).

.
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post #130 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post

Really, how different can they make it? I'm pretty sure my flat panel TV looks a lot like yours and probably not the same brand. If RIMs tablet looks anything unlike the iPad you'll say "what an ugly POS" and if it resembles an iPad you'll say "omg they copied Apple design". Form factor is gonna get copied so get over it.

Make it a different color, perhaps? How about different materials?... Polycarbonate plastics, liquid metal, oops...

When did Kindle go from white to become black er graphite like the iPad? Hmmm...

Here is a question Google will never find the answer to...

Hey Amazon, why the color change?





Did Apple's iPad introduced in April to us all, including Amazon, have anything to do with Amazon going back to the drawing board and R&D labs and that is what they came up with?
/
\\
/

Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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Ten years ago, we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.  Today we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash.

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post #131 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by robogobo View Post

RIM will soon discover the only secret to their Blackberry's success was enterprise saturation and push. And perhaps a physical keyboard. None of that will help a tablet.

Not quite. The concept of the iPad has impressed businesses so much that many of them are thinking of deploying them. But IT departments would have more trouble managing the different iPad and BlackBerry OSes. (BlackBerry has ~60% enterprise marketshare) BlackPad/BlackBerry integration (and the benefits to IT that go along with it) may be enough to make BlackPad a serious contender in the enterprise field. There is a market for this tablet.
post #132 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

Didn't you ever play "doctor" at the age of 10? Maybe, you were doing it wrong!

Veterinarian?

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

Reply
post #133 of 143
So..... their taking advantage of young innocent teenage girls are they.
post #134 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fast Fred 1 View Post

So..... their taking advantage of young innocent teenage girls are they.

... Be careful....

I think it has something to do with hard kbs for texting...

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
post #135 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

When I worked for IBM (1964-1980) they were the unassailable 800 lb gorilla. Big Blue had 97% of the mainframe computer market. In the mid 1970s, DEC, Data General and a few other minicomputers began to challenge IBM's dominance. They still had 97% of mainframes and IBM even introduced some minicomputer class systems of their own.

But the market emphasis had shifted (for lots of reasons) from mainframes to minis.

Personal computers (called microcomputers) were around then, but some technology converged around 1978-9 that shifted the focus once again. That convergence was three things: the Apple ][, Floppy Drives and VisiCalc.

I still worked for IBM, but, with 2 others, had opened a computer store in 1978. One of my partners was a known expert on the Apple ][-- and he was asked to beta test VisiCalc.

Zap!

When that package hit the market it said: I'm here! I'm serious! I can do the job (your work)! I can get it done, NOW!

It helped that a solution like this cost $3,000 or less, but the driving factor was geting it done, NOW!

The typical backlog to get the Data Processing Department to implement an application for an enterprise department was 18 months or longer. The manager of an evolving department (or a new product) could not afford to wait that long for the information he needed-- it was perishable.

So, typically, a couple of smart people in the department would slap together a few quick spreadsheets and voila-- you had a budget, a payroll or product forecast.

So these department managers said: $3,000 and some part time effort vs major $ and 18-month wait...

Data Processing? Data Processing? I don't need no stinkin' Data Processing!


And they didn't. The emphasis had shifted again, and with it went the emphasis on the mainframe and the mini.


We were in the middle of Silicon Valley, selling this "solution" to all the Fortune 500s (IBM, Fairchild, Xerox, Applied Materials, Marriott, Intel, ADP....).

We were part of it, but didn't really recognize what was happening.




So, why am I going on about this?



I'll tell you why!


with the iPhone and the iPad * the emphasis has shifted again!
* (and all those that follow in their footsteps)


Floortops, Desktops, laptops aren't going to go away (we still have mainframes). But their halcyon days are gone -- they are today's legacy systems.


I can carry most of what [information] I need in my pocket or in my hand and have instantaneous access. The stuff I don't have with me, I can pull out of the air! I don't need to spend a lot of money, and I don't need any special training or preparation!


Legacy Computers? Legacy Computers? I don't need no stinkin' Legacy Computers!



... maybe a little premature-- but it's happening!

.



Well Dick, from the the dates I see early 60's you and I both are legacy items. I spent some time at
NAS Alameda in the middle 60's along with a turn on the USS Coral Sea....
post #136 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fast Fred 1 View Post

Well Dick, from the the dates I see early 60's you and I both are legacy items. I spent some time at
NAS Alameda in the middle 60's along with a turn on the USS Coral Sea....

We honor you for your service... Nice props!

How's your cribbage... 24, and no more?


In 1978 IBM rented Mills College for 3 weeks. They brought in all the DP reps (mainframe computer sales/support) for a week of intense training (1 week per region). My team was responsible for motivating them to upgrade their customers from 360/DOS to 360/MVS -- a major, but necessary, conversion.

Long story short, after teaching the same class, 4 times per day, 6 days in a row, for 3 weeks... Techers and techees were exhausted! So, after the last graduation finale, we decided to invade Alameda Island... We were just juiced enough that we almost succeeded.

Some friendly SPs talked us out of doing ourselves harm.... Fun times!

.
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"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
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post #137 of 143
.

Earlier in this thread there were a few comments discussing if the iPad is too big for medical personnel.

Part of the discussion was whether the iPad would fit in the pockets of scrubs or lab coats.

My preliminary feedback from a student at a medical high school -- for scrubs, no livin' way!

I still don't know if a 7" would work in scrubs -- and don't know if either size would work in lab coats.

I wonder what the medicall facilities adopting the iPad are doing?

I need a no-hands iPad carry solution -- got my daughter to agree to make me an underarm quick-access holster.

Maybe, I'll be the first iPad slinger!

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
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post #138 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

.

Earlier in this thread there were a few comments discussing if the iPad is too big for medical personnel.

Part of the discussion was whether the iPad would fit in the pockets of scrubs or lab coats.

My preliminary feedback from a student at a medical high school -- for scrubs, no livin' way!

I've been stating that since it was introduced. Even if they wanted the Apple product physics could make these smaller tablets running mobile OSes more viable.

Because of this I can see Apple creating a smaller tablet, but that would also mean a new UI for iOS, a new export option in the SDK and a separate area for the App Store. Besides the fact that all iProds have currently been accounted for, it seems too soon for Apple to add this complexity to it's ecosystem so soon, regardless of well the iPad is selling.
Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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Dick Applebaum on whether the iPad is a personal computer: "BTW, I am posting this from my iPad pc while sitting on the throne... personal enough for you?"
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post #139 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I've been stating that since it was introduced. Even if they wanted the Apple product physics could make these smaller tablets running mobile OSes more viable.

Because of this I can see Apple creating a smaller tablet, but that would also mean a new UI for iOS, a new export option in the SDK and a separate area for the App Store. Besides the fact that all iProds have currently been accounted for, it seems too soon for Apple to add this complexity to it's ecosystem so soon, regardless of well the iPad is selling.

As a replacement for a notebook or even a netbook, which is what they're lugging around in hospitals and doctors' office today, it looks pretty good as is.
Please don't be insane.
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Please don't be insane.
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post #140 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemikeb View Post

Not quite. The concept of the iPad has impressed businesses so much that many of them are thinking of deploying them. But IT departments would have more trouble managing the different iPad and BlackBerry OSes. (BlackBerry has ~60% enterprise marketshare) BlackPad/BlackBerry integration (and the benefits to IT that go along with it) may be enough to make BlackPad a serious contender in the enterprise field. There is a market for this tablet.

Because the enterprise has to pay RIM for both OTA services as well as the BES servers (and maintenance contracts), native integration of iOS with Exchange is a huge budget win. Almost every Fortune 50 company is working on iOS integration, and a high number of Fortune 100 companies are considering it. Remember also that RIM has had some splash-worthy system outages in the last couple of years, which bled off it's reliability claims. Given budget-tightening and ease of integration, RIM is right to be concerned.
post #141 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

.

Earlier in this thread there were a few comments discussing if the iPad is too big for medical personnel.

Part of the discussion was whether the iPad would fit in the pockets of scrubs or lab coats.

My preliminary feedback from a student at a medical high school -- for scrubs, no livin' way!

I still don't know if a 7" would work in scrubs -- and don't know if either size would work in lab coats.

I wonder what the medicall facilities adopting the iPad are doing?

I need a no-hands iPad carry solution -- got my dayghter to agree to make me an underarm quick-access holster.

Maybe, I'll be the first iPad slinger!

.

Does a legal pad-sized clipboard fit in the pocket of scrubs or a lab coat?
post #142 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

.

Earlier in this thread there were a few comments discussing if the iPad is too big for medical personnel.

Part of the discussion was whether the iPad would fit in the pockets of scrubs or lab coats.

My preliminary feedback from a student at a medical high school -- for scrubs, no livin' way!

I still don't know if a 7" would work in scrubs -- and don't know if either size would work in lab coats.

I wonder what the medicall facilities adopting the iPad are doing?

I need a no-hands iPad carry solution -- got my daughter to agree to make me an underarm quick-access holster.

Maybe, I'll be the first iPad slinger!

.

Quote:
Originally Posted by solipsism View Post

I've been stating that since it was introduced. Even if they wanted the Apple product physics could make these smaller tablets running mobile OSes more viable.

Because of this I can see Apple creating a smaller tablet, but that would also mean a new UI for iOS, a new export option in the SDK and a separate area for the App Store. Besides the fact that all iProds have currently been accounted for, it seems too soon for Apple to add this complexity to it's ecosystem so soon, regardless of well the iPad is selling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post

As a replacement for a notebook or even a netbook, which is what they're lugging around in hospitals and doctors' office today, it looks pretty good as is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Does a legal pad-sized clipboard fit in the pocket of scrubs or a lab coat?

I've been giving portability of the iPad a lot of thought -- not just for medical personnel.

Below. I'll use the iPad as a frame of reference as it is the only tangible [of this new generation] tablet available and has specs and a UX that is pretty well understood.

I think a smaller, say 7", lighter iPad would be be better in some ways -- it certainly would be more "pocketable". But you would lose some of the magic provided by the large screen -- the show and tell magic, if you will.

But, then, I think the current iPad size isn't significant enough to really matter -- in the larger scheme of things.

It is what you can do with it [the form factor] that is so compelling.

Let me see if I can explain what I mean using VisiCalc for comparison. VisiCalc was the driving force behind the adoption of personal computers by business.

Apologies, in advance -- I used some rather big, iPad-size images for illustration.


Here's a VisiCalc screen -- the magic of 1978:



This spread sheet program would run on an Apple ][ with 32K Bytes of RAM -- yes, I said 32 kilobytes, not megabytes.

It was slow, klunky, limited, and kind of ugly.

It was sorta' like the worst sex you ever had... fantastic!

Just look at that display: 20 rows and 4 columns. Sure it was scrollable, and AIR, had a capacity of 255 x 255 rows and columns.

It had very few built-in formulae, and minimal formatting capability.

If your data was too large, you split it into multiple spread sheets.

If it couldn't do everything you wanted, you compensated with a manual work-around.

The point is that the limitations didn't really matter, it was what you could do that was so compelling.


Now here's an iPad display:




The iPad displays a beautiful, high-resolution, color image that a brain surgeon might show to his patient-- it could just as easily be an XRay or other scan.

The image is almost a living thing -- it can be rotated, zoomed, annotated, sections hidden or highlighted, searched, documented in detail...

The doctor can view it side-by-side with you, the patient. He can manipulate and explain it in whatever level of detail you require.

The doctor has the magic of your brain in his hands -- does it really matter that he can't put it in his pocket?

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker." - auxio -
"He who laughs, lasts!" - Mary Pettibone Poole -
Reply
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post #143 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtron View Post

Here's the latest that they have announced:



The UI appears distorted (stretched horizontally) in this image.
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