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Facebook executive expects to reach Ping deal with Apple

post #1 of 29
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The chief technology officer of social networking site Facebook said he expects that his company will reach a deal with Apple to integrate with its own music-centric social networking service, Ping.

Bret Taylor said at a dinner with media in New York this week that he is "very confident" his company will find a way to work with Apple for Ping, according to Silicon Alley Insider. Previous reports had suggested that tensions were high between the two companies, which led some to conclude that talks may have stalled entirely.

Taylor's optimistic comments would imply that a deal will be reached, however the Facebook CTO did not provide a timeframe for a deal to be struck.

Earlier this month, it was alleged that Facebook and Apple were in talks for 18 months before the launch of Ping, but deals fell apart at the last minute. Industry insiders characterized Facebook as "abrasive" in its negotiations with other companies.

When Ping was launched with the debut of iTunes 10, Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs revealed that the iTunes-based service is not tied in to Facebook because, he said, the website demanded "onerous terms." He said that Apple and Facebook talked about a variety of partnership opportunities, but could not come to a deal.

After the talks apparently fell apart, Apple included a "Facebook Connect" login interface without a deal in place. Facebook then allegedly responded by blocking API access to Ping.

Apple has boasted that it registered more than a million users for Ping in its first 48 hours. The opt-in service is built in to the new iTunes 10, and can also be accessed from the iTunes application on the iPhone.

Earlier this week, the release of iTunes 10.0.1 brought about even greater integration with Ping, allowing users to access the new Ping sidebar, and "Like" or "Post" about music right from their library.
post #2 of 29
I'm looking forward to this integration.
Alerting me to music my friends are listening to will help in the never ending hunt for new tunes.
I would like to see bands recommend music they listen to as well.

flick.
post #3 of 29
I'm not a fan of Facebook so this deal is nothing special to me. I'd rather look in Ping for my friends music updates. If I'm looking in Facebook, I'm sure sampling the track or checking out the artist page won't be as easy as it is in iTunes.

But I know that I'm in a minority here. For some reason, the Facebook integration will make a lot of people happy.
post #4 of 29
Some do, I've found a few things following Trent Reznor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flick Justice View Post

I'm looking forward to this integration.
Alerting me to music my friends are listening to will help in the never ending hunt for new tunes.
I would like to see bands recommend music they listen to as well.

flick.
Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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Better than my Bose, better than my Skullcandy's, listening to Mozart through my LeBron James limited edition PowerBeats by Dre is almost as good as my Sennheisers.
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post #5 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by yensid98 View Post

I'm not a fan of Facebook so this deal is nothing special to me. I'd rather look in Ping for my friends music updates. If I'm looking in Facebook, I'm sure sampling the track or checking out the artist page won't be as easy as it is in iTunes.

But I know that I'm in a minority here. For some reason, the Facebook integration will make a lot of people happy.

I just plain hate Facebook, it's a service that encourages and feeds on narcissism like most social networking sites... which makes it a brilliant business, but a real time sinkhole.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I just plain hate Facebook, it's a service that encourages and feeds on narcissism like most social networking sites... which makes it a brilliant business, but a real time sinkhole.

The rest of us will enjoy that sinkhole, as it gives us a reprieve from the boring-ness that is daily life.
post #7 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bartfat View Post

The rest of us will enjoy that sinkhole, as it gives us a reprieve from the boring-ness that is daily life.

Yes! Being mindful and actually experiencing the simple joys of human experience in our own lives is just too boring. If we can just stay a bit more in touch with the musical tastes of friends and celebrities, our lives will finally become more meaningful and bearable.
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

Bret Taylor said at a dinner with media in New York this week that he is "very confident" his company will find a way to work with Apple for Ping, . . .

Imagine that a confident executive from Facebook. How surprising.
I wonder when people will start to figure out that Facebook is a leach of a spam platform and that the internet itself has been one big "social media" platform since its inception decades ago?
I wonder when the'lly figure out that the whole "social media" thing could all be a public utility where the users control their own information? Hmmm . . .
post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I just plain hate Facebook, it's a service that encourages and feeds on narcissism like most social networking sites... which makes it a brilliant business, but a real time sinkhole.

Have you got a gaming console? TV? TV is the real time sinkhole, and gaming is just as bad. At least Facebook serves a useful purpose.

I don't watch TV, I don't play games (though currently I play StarCraft II once or twice a week). I do use Facebook, and I've found it an invaluable way to keep in touch with friends who live too far away or have no time to meet regularly in person.
post #10 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Have you got a gaming console? TV? TV is the real time sinkhole, and gaming is just as bad. At least Facebook serves a useful purpose..

Yeah, because clicking on cows and getting swamped with friend requests from people you stopped talking to for a reason is so productive.
post #11 of 29
That'd be great! It'd be the best of both worlds:

1. Apple has a great music service but a poor social user base.
2. Facebook has a great social user base but a poor music service (I don't really like iLike).
post #12 of 29
The conversation here so far is hilarious.

Facebook is a huge phenomenon, that's for sure. It fills a strong perceived need for people to be in constant contact with others, whether they're "real" friends or not. And it helps people feel important, and "tuned in".

The problem is this folks: Facebook is not a benign entity. They do not exist to help you communicate with others. They exist to make a profit, and the way they do that is by extracting as much personal information from you as they possibly can. And as often as they can. And then by taking advantage of that information (and you, and your friends) as broadly and as deeply as they can. There is no reason for them to discontinue this behavior, since they are not regulated, and people are still fawning all over them and signing up like fleas at a dog show.

Just remember that NOTHING you post or upload is likely to remain out of view of the general public. Every time you turn around you're going to be fighting with Facebook's revolving privacy settings - which ALWAYS expand toward fully public. Look at this wonderful pie chart showing how the privacy settings have changed over time: http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/ And above all, know that EVERYTHING you post or upload is available forever to The Facebook Corporation. And they can do whatever they want with it.

On a (hopefully) more positive note, there is nothing wrong with the desire to communicate and share with your friends. And I expect that because of Facebook's somewhat evil mindset, something else will come along that will not be driven by the same type of profit-by-extracting-personal-information, and make-everything-public intent. The best solution(s) will probably be open source and/or distributed in nature, where each individual has full and complete control over who sees their information, with no private corporation serving as a central warehouse. One interesting project along these lines is Diaspora (http://www.joindiaspora.com), which is fresh out of the gate. No idea if this particular solution will be "the one", but at least some smart people are paying attention.
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post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsenka View Post

Yeah, because clicking on cows and getting swamped with friend requests from people you stopped talking to for a reason is so productive.

LOL, I don't play any FB games and they're easy to ignore completely or block so you don't get any requests at all. And really... "not talking" is so childish.

Meanwhile, there are many people we don't talk to not out of choice but out of convenience. That's where Facebook helps immensely.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

Just remember that NOTHING you post or upload is likely to remain out of view of the general public. Every time you turn around you're going to be fighting with Facebook's revolving privacy settings - which ALWAYS expand toward fully public. Look at this wonderful pie chart showing how the privacy settings have changed over time: http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/ And above all, know that EVERYTHING you post or upload is available forever to The Facebook Corporation. And they can do whatever they want with it.

Well, since I don't post my credit card number, my social security number or even my home address on Facebook, I don't really care. I'm not going to run for office. No one cares that much about ME that they'll collect any info on me that is going to be used for anything more than an innocuous marketing scheme.

I think the people who think they are so important that anyone cares about archiving their friends' photos or inane comments about their day or musical tastes are really the narcissistic ones.
post #15 of 29
I'm sure Ping is small potatoes to them, I don't know why they're playing such hardball, as to not have had an agreement at launch. Perhaps they have learned not to underestimate Stev... errr.... Apple.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Well, since I don't post my credit card number, my social security number or even my home address on Facebook, I don't really care.

You only think you haven't posted your home address. ;-)
http://www.google.com/search?q=nyt+g...veal+more+wish
click the first link, the New York Times article.

Okay, maybe you don't post photos either, or you're smart enough and on the ball enough that you've already removed that info. Or you have an older camera (but that will change). But y'know, there are millions of people doing shit that they have no idea about.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

I'm not going to run for office. No one cares that much about ME that they'll collect any info on me that is going to be used for anything more than an innocuous marketing scheme.

I think the people who think they are so important that anyone cares about archiving their friends' photos or inane comments about their day or musical tastes are really the narcissistic ones.

Heh. I enjoyed the humor there, it's cute. And there is some truth to what you're saying.

But security through obscurity doesn't work very well for computers and it doesn't work very well for humans either. Not once the internet is full of massive (direct and inferred) data about nearly every person breathing. Just like bots can run through millions of servers testing every port for security holes, your data will eventually be ransacked by anyone and everyone with an agenda, whether you're important or not.

People are sort of hiding in their little worlds, thinking it's no big deal because they're so unimportant. And for lots of people that's probably true for now. But look ahead, look at the trend lines and extrapolate what's coming. Along the trajectory we're on, imagine what things will look like in a few years. No longer are you some obscure dude (or dudette) minding your own business, but you're a potential mark for pretty much anyone who wants to find someone to take advantage of. If your data fits their profile, your obscurity no longer matters. And there will be a thousand vectors, available to anyone. Might cost a few bucks, but even that will approach zero on a per-person basis because of the massive amounts of data available. Yes, this is sort of a depressing tinfoil-ish view, but seriously, few people are looking ahead and trying to understand where we're going to be 10 years from now. And those who are looking down that road and putting critical thought into it have serious concerns.

Here's another thing to consider. You might have no concerns about yourself, but what about your kids? think they might want to do something with their lives? or your family/friends? And people post millions of pictures of their kids online every day, giving potential predators valuable information. Why?! Sometimes it's for distant relatives, but that can be done more privately. Mostly it's narcissism.
No Matte == No Sale :-(
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No Matte == No Sale :-(
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post #17 of 29
I have no interest in social networking like this but I can see Apple is doing a great job with the younger generations and that is all for the betterment of Apple's long term future. Those teeny boppers glued to FB will one day be business men and woman or graphic designers or video editors. They are the future so Apple is right to not only embrace but lead in those fields of great importance to the younger set. BTW I do realize many older folks love FB too so maybe it's just me that doesn't feel the need
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

The problem is this folks: Facebook is not a benign entity.

Just remember that NOTHING you post or upload is likely to remain out of view of the general public. Look at this wonderful pie chart showing how the privacy settings have changed over time: http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

any idiot who can clik on privacy settings can lock all of this down as much as they want.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

And above all, know that EVERYTHING you post or upload is available forever to The Facebook Corporation. And they can do whatever they want with it.

if you request it, they will permanently delete all of your information at any time.

...i did hear they're working on wifi mind control, but i'm sure you're wearing your tin foil cap to protect yourself.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by desarc View Post

any idiot who can clik on privacy settings can lock all of this down as much as they want.



if you request it, they will permanently delete all of your information at any time.

...i did hear they're working on wifi mind control, but i'm sure you're wearing your tin foil cap to protect yourself.

The delete part is good news (I assume the other is a joke ), I did read a while back something about anything you uploaded was theirs by right and you had so agreed in the TOS. So a) They no longer do this and b) They will delete everything?

I quit FB and accidentally rejoined many months later when trying to reply to a blog. It came up with all my pics and vids still there even though I had quit and had the account removed ... I thought. I assume even though I quit I need to go an extra step to have the data deleted? As an expert can you please explain how that's done. Thanks much.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
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post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

can you please explain how that's done. Thanks much.

https://ssl.facebook.com/help/contac...delete_account

this will permanently delete your account and anything contained in your account. Facebook will not be able to use that info in the future.

what's important to know is that if you post something on someone's wall, or send someone an email via facebook, THEY KEEP that info, even if you delete your account. You would have to ask them to delete the post or message.
...before you get all up in arms about this, understand that it's the EXACT same as sending someone an email. just because you delete that email account doesn't mean your message to them is deleted.

you can also email privacy@facebook.com with more specific questions.
it may take a day or two, but they're very good about responding

for more info: http://blog.facebook.com/blog.php?post=54434097130
post #21 of 29
The problem I have with Ping is that I am not really interested in the marketing type of posts that bands/artists make. I get enough advertising in my daily life. I just want to know what music they recommend, other than their own. Maybe a FB integration will swing it more to the social aspect of the medium.

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post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by techno View Post

The problem I have with Ping is that I am not really interested in the marketing type of posts that bands/artists make. I get enough advertising in my daily life. I just want to know what music they recommend, other than their own. Maybe a FB integration will swing it more to the social aspect of the medium.

As one of the first Ping superusers, Rick Rubin (Def Jam founder and current Columbia VP) has consistently recommended great stuff.

And there are bands and other band members who really do recommend great music. The Fleet Foxes Facebook page has been a Godsend, and although the band's not on Ping yet (probably some record label hang-up), Robin Pecknold has a Ping page and has been recommending good stuff. Brian Molko is also someone I follow on Ping.

As mentioned before, Trent Reznor and the NIN Ping page have been helpful as well, even pointing fans to an awesome free download of Reznor tracks from the "The Social Network" movie.

If you want a particular band's recommendations, it's a good idea to search for the frontman on Ping.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Well, since I don't post my credit card number, my social security number or even my home address on Facebook, I don't really care. I'm not going to run for office. No one cares that much about ME that they'll collect any info on me that is going to be used for anything more than an innocuous marketing scheme.

I think the people who think they are so important that anyone cares about archiving their friends' photos or inane comments about their day or musical tastes are really the narcissistic ones.

Well, there you go... Facebook is the final answer for people who have 'given up'.

Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

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Proud AAPL stock owner.

 

GOA

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post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

Well, there you go... Facebook is the final answer for people who have 'given up'.

Given up on being king of the world? Sure. No interest.

I'm very VERY happy with my life... and I'm happy I've gotten back into touch with friends from high school, my cousin who I never had the chance to get close with (not because I didn't want to, just because we lived in different places), and friends I really care about but don't have enough time to see on a regular basis.

For those of you who still aspire to "win" whatever game you think life is... all power to you. I'm too busy enjoying life to be bothered with juvenile competition.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonton View Post

Well, since I don't post my credit card number, my social security number or even my home address on Facebook, I don't really care. I'm not going to run for office. No one cares that much about ME that they'll collect any info on me that is going to be used for anything more than an innocuous marketing scheme.

employers try to look at facebook when assessing potential job candidates. the pictures of you at your buddy's bachelor party posted on facebook might not help in getting that new job, nor the posts about how much some old co-worker sux...
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by desarc View Post

employers try to look at facebook when assessing potential job candidates. the pictures of you at your buddy's bachelor party posted on facebook might not help in getting that new job, nor the posts about how much some old co-worker sux...

I'll keep that in mind.

Fortunately, I'm not looking for a job now.

And I ALWAYS keep personal work politics out of public commentary (with one exception).
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah64 View Post

The conversation here so far is hilarious.

Facebook is a huge phenomenon, that's for sure. It fills a strong perceived need for people to be in constant contact with others, whether they're "real" friends or not. And it helps people feel important, and "tuned in".

Quote:
The problem is this folks: Facebook is not a benign entity.

The best solution(s) will probably be open source and/or distributed in nature, where each individual has full and complete control over who sees their information, with no private corporation serving as a central warehouse. One interesting project along these lines is Diaspora (http://www.joindiaspora.com), which is fresh out of the gate. No idea if this particular solution will be "the one", but at least some smart people are paying attention.

I agree. Zuckerberg is a punk-ass kid who thinks he's King of the World. Because of that, people need a viable alternative to Facebook. I'm planning on migrating to Diaspora as soon as they go live. I've asked them specific questions about privacy issues and how content is managed, and they've responded to me quickly and satisfactorily.

Quote:
Originally Posted by desarc View Post

any idiot who can clik on privacy settings can lock all of this down as much as they want.

if you request it, they will permanently delete all of your information at any time.

You're awfully trusting of a company that has been hit with countless criticisms of abusing users' privacy. And it's not about users being idiots or whatever. It's about a company not behaving in an ethical manner, i.e. honoring the trust of its users. I have my privacy settings set to "Friends only" on everything, and I also disabled search engine access, and I still found comments I made through a Google search. Granted, they're not legally obligated to be good corporate citizens, but they don't have to be evil either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post

I quit FB and accidentally rejoined many months later when trying to reply to a blog. It came up with all my pics and vids still there even though I had quit and had the account removed ... I thought.

I'm inclined to think that even when they supposedly "delete" your account, they merely block your access to your account, while retaining all of your content. As far as you're concerned, your account has been deleted, but I'm sure they still have everything about you.

When you sign up w/ Facebook, you effectively give them control of your online social life.

Bringing this back to Ping, I'm sure that in the initial round of negotiations, the Facebook gang tried to bully Apple into making Ping and "opt-out" service, and to allow Facebook to have access to users' entire libraries. Honestly, I'm not sure why Apple wants any kind of deal with Facebook. I know I certainly need or even want them to form a partnership.

I've never harbored any illusions that Facebook is anything other than a large data mine, using the "social network" model to get users to disclose as much personal information (via wall posts, "Likes", etc.). As such, I've been very careful about what I post and to whom. But I shouldn't have to be paranoid. In a good social network, I would have complete control over who has access to my contentmy content should be my own.
"Don't be a dick!"Wil Wheaton
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"Don't be a dick!"Wil Wheaton
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post #28 of 29
I'd just as soon not bleed more personal information to Facebook.
post #29 of 29
Google knows more about you than Facebook does.
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