or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Nielsen: Android overtakes Apple's iOS in latest US smartphone sales
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Nielsen: Android overtakes Apple's iOS in latest US smartphone sales

post #1 of 176
Thread Starter 
New sales data from Nielsen shows that Google's Android mobile operating system was the top-selling platform in recent months, ahead of Apple's iOS, which powers the iPhone.

The data, released on Monday, covers a six-month period of U.S. that went through August. The figures include one full month of iPhone 4 sales, as the device went on sale in late June.

Nielsen's survey found that for the first full month of iPhone 4 sales, Android devices represented 28 percent of new smartphone purchases, while Apple's handset took 26 percent. The gap widened in August, when Android was 32 percent of all smartphone sales, compared to Apple's 25 percent.

Since the company said the results only included one full month of iPhone 4 sales, presumably the poll did not cover the entirety of August.

Regardless, the figures show that Android devices have collectively outsold the iPhone since April of 2010, and continued their climb even after Apple's latest smartphone launched in the summer.

Looking beyond new purchases, Apple still maintains a large lead in overall mobile operating system share. Nielsen's figures show that iOS is represented on 28 percent of smartphone owners polled.

Apple remains behind the leader, Research in Motion's BlackBerry, which had a 31 percent share in August. But the gap is narrowing from the start of the year, when RIM carried 36 percent.



BlackBerry sales were also most affected by the launch of the iPhone 4. Sales of BlackBerry phones declined significantly in July, the first full month of iPhone 4 sales.

Android sales have been on a steady rise, however, growing from just 8 percent in January to a 19 percent smartphone share in August.

Of course, in the U.S. the iPhone remains available on only one carrier -- AT&T. In addition to being available on multiple hardware configurations, Google's mobile operating system is also available on all four major domestic carriers.



Polling companies have been saying for months that the total sum of Android phones has been outselling the iPhone in the U.S. Still, no single Android phone has compared to Apple's iPhone -- the iPhone 4 sold 1.7 million units in just its first three days of availability.

In a keynote presentation in early September, Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs made a thinly veiled attack against Android, noting that Apple is activating over 230,000 iOS devices per day, and has shipped more than 120 million iOS devices since the first iPhone launched in 2007.

"We think that some of our friends are counting upgrades in their numbers," Jobs said. "If we counted upgrades in our numbers, they'd be way higher than 230,000."

Google fired back with an official statement, suggesting that Jobs' comments were inaccurate. "The Android numbers do not include upgrades and are, in fact, only a portion of the Android devices in the market, since we only include devices that have Google services," the company said.
post #2 of 176
A phone on all carriers, buy one get one free deals...it better have a bigger market share than the iPhone.
post #3 of 176
Why is this kept getting reported? There has been countless reports already since April that Android devices are outselling the iPhone.
post #4 of 176
Honestly, I prefer Apple in the position of not being a market share leader. It makes them more hungry for one thing, and I like it when people and competitors underestimate them.

Likewise, too many people are drinking the Apple cool-aid just because they see Apple products in the media all the time. If you're in it for the wrong reasons, you should go back to Nokia.
post #5 of 176
If Apple does not want the iPhone to get reduced to Mac like market share numbers, they really really need to move to other carriers. Now, its possible they may be okay with that (after all, Apple makes more out of macs in terms of profit than any other PC maker does).

However, I don't think so. Steve Jobs said that the biggest mistake Apple made in its early years was not go for market share when they needed to. I don't think he is going to repeat that mistake. The moment the ATT exclusivity contract runs out (likely within the year), expect the iPhone to be on TMobile at the very least.

I think its likely they will also hit up Sprint, but Verizon might be doubtful. That still gives Apple access to about 55-60% of mobile customers in the US, so hopefully the number should increase.
post #6 of 176
the iPhone needs to get on other carriers or it will get left behind...

i don't even think that would help that much at this point as many people have switched to AT&T already in order to get the iphone.

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply
post #7 of 176
Doomed, I tell you, doomed.
This fascination with market share (by definition, a zero-sum game) is just silly. I know it generates page views, but let's be serious.
What counts is selling stuff at a profit.
post #8 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

the iPhone needs to get on other carriers or it will get left behind...

i don't even think that would help that much at this point as many people have switched to AT&T already in order to get the iphone.

How do things look on a worldwide basis? IIRC, in most all of the biggest markets, the iPhone is available on multiple carriers.

Is Android outselling iOS in places where both are widely available? That might give insight into whether or not the single-carrier strategy was a blunder in the US. I'm not convinced that it has a major impact on sales, and I'm not convinced that iPhone sales would be greatly higher if it were available on more carriers in the US.
post #9 of 176
Larger market share =/= better products.
post #10 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJinTX View Post

Honestly, I prefer Apple in the position of not being a market share leader. It makes them more hungry for one thing, and I like it when people and competitors underestimate them.

Likewise, too many people are drinking the Apple cool-aid just because they see Apple products in the media all the time. If you're in it for the wrong reasons, you should go back to Nokia.

So what is the right reason? I bought it for ease of use, reliable updates, nice cell phone camera/video camera, integration with iTunes. I think In November I will be able to use airplay with the new appletv (not sure I will have one.. Not sure it makes sense for me). Great access to Internet. Unexpected benefit is good to very good battery life.
post #11 of 176
How can this be a big deal? The iPhone is a handful of devices. Android is on 16,000 devices. Hell, I think I saw someone running it on an old bag phone from 1983 earlier today. Seriously though, how many devices are in each companies camp. It like comparing the Mini Cooper to ford trucks in general. You can't really brag (android) when it's running on any piece of crap hardware.
post #12 of 176
Apple makes more money off the iPhone than all the companies selling Android phones combined. Let HTC and Motorola fight over the scraps.
post #13 of 176
Given the quality of the iPhone, this isn't a replay of Apple vs. cheap IBM based PC's everywhere.
Cubist
Reply
Cubist
Reply
post #14 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJinTX View Post

Likewise, too many people are drinking the Apple cool-aid just because they see Apple products in the media all the time. If you're in it for the wrong reasons, you should go back to Nokia.

Haha I agree. Too many ex PC users for my liking on the platform already (and on this forum). I wouldn't mind, but their media puppet sheep-like visionless mentality irritates me to no end.

Yeah, yeah, cue the psychological projection...
post #15 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by iancass79 View Post

How can this be a big deal? The iPhone is a handful of devices. Android is on 16,000 devices. Hell, I think I saw someone running it on an old bag phone from 1983 earlier today. Seriously though, how many devices are in each companies camp. It like comparing the Mini Cooper to ford trucks in general. You can't really brag (android) when it's running on any piece of crap hardware.

Except that you CAN make a comparison when you're talking about the user base available to developers and advertisers.

This is where Apple may not care as much as we hope though:

Google's strategy is to get Android on as many phones with as many users as possible. This allows them to serve up Andoid Apps, Google products and Google ads to make money. Google has no share in the profits on the actual OS or the phones.

Apple makes money on the phones, in addition to the App store, iTunes and eventually iAds. This is why they aren't as concerned with lowering the price and opening the platform up to more carriers. Presumably, the subsidy (and Apple's profits) would go down on a per phone basis if Apple were to open the US market up to additional carriers.

Over time though, more and more of the revenue stream will come after the sale of the initial phone. As this increases, the pressure for Apple to get their phone into more hands will increase. If things continue the way they are going, Google will be pretty far ahead, income wise.

Right now, it isn't a big deal to them. As time goes on, it should become more important. And as Apple tries to get their iPhone into more hands, the user experience should improve as a result. Thus, the success of Android should be good news to iPhone users.

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply
post #16 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

New sales data from Nielsen shows that Google's Android mobile operating system was the top-selling platform in recent months, ahead of Apple's iOS, which powers the iPhone.

The data, released on Monday, covers a six-month period of U.S. that went through the August. The figures include one full month of iPhone 4 sales, as the device went on sale in late June.

Nielsen's survey found that for the first full month of iPhone 4 sales, Android devices represented 28 percent of new smartphone purchases, while Apple's handset took 26 percent. The gap widened in August, when Android was 32 percent of all smartphone sales, compared to Apple's 25 percent.

Since the company said the results only included one full month of iPhone 4 sales, presumably the poll did not cover the entirety of August.

Regardless, the figures show that Android devices have collectively outsold the iPhone since April of 2010, and continued their climb even after Apple's latest smartphone launched in the summer.

Looking beyond new purchases, Apple still maintains a large lead in overall mobile operating system share. Nielsen's figures show that iOS is represented on 28 percent of smartphone owners polled.

Apple remains behind the leader, Research in Motion's BlackBerry, which had a 31 percent share in August. But the gap is narrowing from the start of the year, when RIM carried 36 percent.



BlackBerry sales were also most affected by the launch of the iPhone 4. Sales of BlackBerry phones declined significantly in July, the first full month of iPhone 4 sales.

Android sales have been on a steady rise, however, growing from just 8 percent in January to a 19 percent smartphone share in August.

Of course, in the U.S. the iPhone remains available on only one carrier -- AT&T. In addition to being available on multiple hardware configurations, Google's mobile operating system is also available on all four major domestic carriers.



Polling companies have been saying for months that the total sum of Android phones has been outselling the iPhone in the U.S. Still, no single Android phone has compared to Apple's iPhone -- the iPhone 4 sold 1.7 million units in just its first three days of availability.

In a keynote presentation in early September, Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs made a thinly veiled attack against Android, noting that Apple is activating over 230,000 iOS devices per day, and has shipped more than 120 million iOS devices since the first iPhone launched in 2007.

"We think that some of our friends are counting upgrades in their numbers," Jobs said. "If we counted upgrades in our numbers, they'd be way higher than 230,000."

Google fired back with an official statement, suggesting that Jobs' comments were inaccurate. "The android numbers do not include upgrades and are, in fact, only a portion of the Android devices in the market, since we only include devices that have Google services," the company said.

Not sure why this matters - iOS is on one manufacturer's devices, under one network. Android is on multiple devices under multiple networks. Apple doesn't do BOGO. Many Android units are moved as part of a BOGO. It should be surprising that it took Android so LONG to surpass iOS in numbers. Makes you wonder what happens when iOS devices are available on more than just AT&T - then the games really begin.
post #17 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickmini View Post

Not sure why this matters - iOS is on one manufacturer's devices, under one network. Android is on multiple devices under multiple networks. Apple doesn't do BOGO. Many Android units are moved as part of a BOGO. It should be surprising that it took Android so LONG to surpass iOS in numbers. Makes you wonder what happens when iOS devices are available on more than just AT&T - then the games really begin.

It matters because Google now has a larger user base to sell apps to, to serve ads to, and eventually, to sell media to.

If Google surpasses Apple by enough on this point, Android will become the primary platform that mobile developers are catering to, and iOS will fall behind.

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply
post #18 of 176
They should be comparing Apple to other manufacturers NOT the total Android market.

Of course Android is going to be bigger than iOS it is sold by many more manufacturers who get it for FREE!

Not a fair marketplace really.
post #19 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

If Apple does not want the iPhone to get reduced to Mac like market share numbers, they really really need to move to other carriers.

However, I don't think so. Steve Jobs said that the biggest mistake Apple made in its early years was not go for market share when they needed to. I don't think he is going to repeat that mistake.

First Bill Gates
Now Eric Schmidt

Steve Snow-Jobs needs to pick better friends I think. \
post #20 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

If Apple does not want the iPhone to get reduced to Mac like market share numbers, they really really need to move to other carriers. Now, its possible they may be okay with that (after all, Apple makes more out of macs in terms of profit than any other PC maker does).

However, I don't think so. Steve Jobs said that the biggest mistake Apple made in its early years was not go for market share when they needed to. I don't think he is going to repeat that mistake. The moment the ATT exclusivity contract runs out (likely within the year), expect the iPhone to be on TMobile at the very least.

I think its likely they will also hit up Sprint, but Verizon might be doubtful. That still gives Apple access to about 55-60% of mobile customers in the US, so hopefully the number should increase.

What a bunch of crap. Apple is producing > 3 Million iPhone units, > 3 Million iPad units and soon a crap load of AppleTV units per month that combined will sooner rather than later top 10 Million units per month for the iOS Ecosystem.

With their premiums, Apple will easily surpass $400/share.

Sorry, but Apple is sitting pretty.
post #21 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by CIM View Post

Apple makes more money off the iPhone than all the companies selling Android phones combined. Let HTC and Motorola fight over the scraps.

Exactly. Google adopted the Microsoft model even though it's been proven to have finally surpassed the Law of Diminishing Returns. It's all fracture at this point.
post #22 of 176
Steve Snowed-Jobs - It works better as an adjective.
post #23 of 176
...Google's revenue from Android = ZERO.
post #24 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by addicted44 View Post

If Apple does not want the iPhone to get reduced to Mac like market share numbers, they really really need to move to other carriers. Now, its possible they may be okay with that (after all, Apple makes more out of macs in terms of profit than any other PC maker does).

However, I don't think so. Steve Jobs said that the biggest mistake Apple made in its early years was not go for market share when they needed to. I don't think he is going to repeat that mistake. The moment the ATT exclusivity contract runs out (likely within the year), expect the iPhone to be on TMobile at the very least.

I think its likely they will also hit up Sprint, but Verizon might be doubtful. That still gives Apple access to about 55-60% of mobile customers in the US, so hopefully the number should increase.


Not the issue.

Over here in UK, the picture is pretty similar and iPhone is on all networks.


problem for Apple is their greed and the total cost of ownership compared to a similar Android phone is far higher.

Same Carrier, same tariff, same data allowance.

Galaxy S = 24mths x £20 & free phone = TCO £480

iPhone 4 = 24mths x £30 plus £99 for phone = TCO £819

the S is arguably a better piece of hardware, certainly a better phone so why would people pay 70 or 80% for the inferior product?

this isn't a big mystery.
post #25 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesw View Post

...Google's revenue from Android = ZERO.

try researching before spouting utter tosh..


You probably know Google gives Android away for free. You might think Android development still costs Google money. Well, CEO Eric Schmidt tells Newsweek's Dan Lyons that Android phones already generate enough new ad revenue to cover Google's costs.

http://gizmodo.com/5655462/in-case-y...le-makes-money
post #26 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by monstrosity View Post

Haha I agree. Too many ex PC users for my liking on the platform already (and on this forum). I wouldn't mind, but their media puppet sheep-like visionless mentality irritates me to no end.

Yeah, yeah, cue the psychological projection...

This is said of the mac communities more and more, but I think it's because the number of switchers have increased rapidly in the last couple of years. As you know, humans are always enthused with learning new things. It will pass....
post #27 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesw View Post

...Google's revenue from Android = ZERO.

Not really. What about mobile ads? Android market transaction fees?

Those will start to add up, especially when Android is expanding their user base at iOS's expense.

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply

iPad2 16 GB
iPhone 5 32 GB

Reply
post #28 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Not really. What about mobile ads? Android market transaction fees?

Those will start to add up, especially when Android is expanding their user base at iOS's expense.

they're sooooo small it's practically ZERO.
post #29 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by zindako View Post

Larger market share =/= better products.

Like MS... and Sony...
post #30 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Like MS... and Sony...

or Android...
post #31 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wurm5150 View Post

Why is this kept getting reported? There has been countless reports already since April that Android devices are outselling the iPhone.

It's sounds as if google is paying for these researches so that they send a message to the development community that the fastest growing market is Andriod. Microsoft When comes into picture will eat andriods lunch as it will be the same vendors which are aligning with Google.
post #32 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

It matters because Google now has a larger user base to sell apps to, to serve ads to, and eventually, to sell media to.

If Google surpasses Apple by enough on this point, Android will become the primary platform that mobile developers are catering to, and iOS will fall behind.

...the developers are making decent revenue on the platform. And that enough users are driving ad revenue for both developers and Google. Does it matter that Android is the primary platform? Probably not for the foreseeable future.

And it irritates me that reports continually conflat sales and installed base and growth numbers as if they were all equally valid. And no one calls them on it. Enough! Use the numbers correctly and stop being such tools. Apple drives profitability with whatever marketshare it deems as most profitable - in the case of the iPods, it's a majority share. In the case of the Mac platform - it's a 2-8% or so depending whose numbers you look at and which markets. But they still in each case own the highest profitability for the segment or market.

And let's not forget Microsoft. They fired the first shot across the Android bow with licensing for HTC. Motorola got the second. Microsoft will make sure that not only will they get their piece of the Android action, but that Android will longer be "free" to the carriers. Each install of Android will carry a Microsoft tax with it. And if Oracle has it's way Goggle will pay up significantly, potentially losing Android altogether, and be forced to force-mature Chrome into handhelds.

All this while Apple is moving on down the road, already planning the next generation of devices in their ecosystem and the next disruption in someone's comfortable little market. Cool thing is, Apple has forced the laissez faire handheld makers into an unwanted competition to build the next big thing - and that is good for all of us.
post #33 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxman View Post

Like MS... and Sony...

This is where the debate between those who own shares and those who are enthusiasts of the Apple culture, rages on...
post #34 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by davesw View Post

they're sooooo small it's practically ZERO.

re-posted due to blindness...





try researching before spouting utter tosh..


You probably know Google gives Android away for free. You might think Android development still costs Google money. Well, CEO Eric Schmidt tells Newsweek's Dan Lyons that Android phones already generate enough new ad revenue to cover Google's costs.

http://gizmodo.com/5655462/in-case-y...le-makes-money
post #35 of 176
Cheerios is the most popular cereal sold... but if I like Quaker 100% Natural with raisins and dates then what does that matter?

I know it goes both ways... but seriously, do AppleInsider people really care (or believe) what that means?

There we go, the post counter went up by one.

post #36 of 176
I always wondered about these numbers. What does smart phone mean? Mossberg and Pogue say that iPhone is a new category of super smart phones or app phones, I don't think every Android phone qualifies.

Are these analysts counting that every Android phone is an iPhone equivalent? Just like every blackberry even those that can barely browse the web or run apps is counted as a 'smart phone'. Nokia is supposed to have something like 40% world wide smartphone market share, does anyone believe that Nokia is selling so many more iPhone equivalents? Fact is most of those Nokia 'smart phones' are just feature or 'music' phones.

IPhone is only 2% of worldwide cell phone market share,
With that 2% Apple is making 39-48% (Cannacord & Asymco numbers) of total worldwide phone (smart and dumb) profits.

If these guys Nokia, Rim, Android are selling so many super smart phones (iPhone equals) as the analysts Market share numbers suggest WHY IS APPLE MAKING 39-48% OF THE PROFITS?

if Android gets bigger market share by producing huge numbers of lower quality phones eating into the 98% it's not a big deal.

(I of course also agree with the people that argue that iPhone is only one carrier in the U.S and Android is bolstered by BOGO deals)
post #37 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by freddych View Post

Except that you CAN make a comparison when you're talking about the user base available to developers and advertisers.

This is where Apple may not care as much as we hope though:

Google's strategy is to get Android on as many phones with as many users as possible. This allows them to serve up Andoid Apps, Google products and Google ads to make money. Google has no share in the profits on the actual OS or the phones.

Apple makes money on the phones, in addition to the App store, iTunes and eventually iAds. This is why they aren't as concerned with lowering the price and opening the platform up to more carriers. Presumably, the subsidy (and Apple's profits) would go down on a per phone basis if Apple were to open the US market up to additional carriers.

Over time though, more and more of the revenue stream will come after the sale of the initial phone. As this increases, the pressure for Apple to get their phone into more hands will increase. If things continue the way they are going, Google will be pretty far ahead, income wise.

Right now, it isn't a big deal to them. As time goes on, it should become more important. And as Apple tries to get their iPhone into more hands, the user experience should improve as a result. Thus, the success of Android should be good news to iPhone users.

The best post I have ever seen on an Apple Fan Site!! FINALLY, someone understands.

Market share absolutely matters to developers, and by extension should matter to end users . If there's one thing Ballmer has right (and he doesn't have much), it's DEVELOPERS, DEVELOPERS, DEVELOPERS!!! I HAVE to have a Windows machine sitting next to my Mac - I have to have AutoCad, I have to have Oracle Primavera PPM, I have to Loadspring (which requires IE), I have to have several other pieces of Engineering software that isn't available on the Mac. Why isn't it???? Because developers have little interest in developing their software for a machine with a 5% market share...

Same thing WILL happen to iOS if Jobs doesn't wake up..

And PLEASE, some of you, what the hell do I care as an end user what Apple's "Margin is", or "how much profit they make".... I could care less.. I would much rather the Mac and the iPhone to have industry standard software available to it - and the Mac doesn't and iOS won't if Jobs doesn't get his head out of his ass (again)....
iMac 24" (Late 07), iMac 17" G5, Mac mini (Early 09), MacBook (Mid 07), iPad WiFi 32, iPhone 4, iBook G4 1.2, HP Compaq 610 Laptop, eMachine W5233, (1) Xserve G5 and (1) Xserve G5 Cluster node with...
Reply
iMac 24" (Late 07), iMac 17" G5, Mac mini (Early 09), MacBook (Mid 07), iPad WiFi 32, iPhone 4, iBook G4 1.2, HP Compaq 610 Laptop, eMachine W5233, (1) Xserve G5 and (1) Xserve G5 Cluster node with...
Reply
post #38 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bibbler View Post

The best post I have ever seen on an Apple Fan Site!! FINALLY, someone understands.

Market share absolutely matters to developers, and by extension should matter to end users . If there's one thing Ballmer has right (and he doesn't have much), it's DEVELOPERS, DEVELOPERS, DEVELOPERS!!! I HAVE to have a Windows machine sitting next to my Mac - I have to have AutoCad, I have to have Oracle Primavera PPM, I have to Loadspring (which requires IE), I have to have several other pieces of Engineering software that isn't available on the Mac. Why isn't it???? Because developers have little interest in developing their software for a machine with a 5% market share...

Same thing WILL happen to iOS if Jobs doesn't wake up..

And PLEASE, some of you, what the hell do I care as an end user what Apple's "Margin is", or "how much profit they make".... I could care less.. I would much rather the Mac and the iPhone to have industry standard software available to it - and the Mac doesn't and iOS won't if Jobs doesn't get his head out of his ass (again)....


great post... just to add, if Apple asked or even paid MS to port Office to iOS (for the iPad) they could kill all netbook sales immediately.

Native office support makes it THE ultimate business tool.
post #39 of 176


Article here.
Blindness is a condition as well as a state of mind.

Reply
Blindness is a condition as well as a state of mind.

Reply
post #40 of 176
I am not an analyst, so the image alone made me laugh.

"Fading"... let me guess, the metrics were run first, then the quadrants were defined to slant the meaning of study results.

I like Apple... but those drawings look totally bogus.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: iPhone
AppleInsider › Forums › Mobile › iPhone › Nielsen: Android overtakes Apple's iOS in latest US smartphone sales