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Autodesk releases native AutoCAD 2011 for Mac

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Autodesk has officially introduced AutoCAD 2011 for Mac OS X, bringing its freeform 3D design and drafting tools back to the Mac after an 18 year hiatus.

Word of a secret AutoCAD for Mac beta program first surfaced this spring, and was only confirmed by Autodesk in August.

At the time, the company targeted a release date in October, which it has now met with the new release. The high end product uses an interface familiar to existing Windows AutoCAD users, while adding support for a variety of Mac OS X features including CoverFlow for browsing through design files graphically, support for multitouch trackpad gestures for pan and zoom, and native help.

Andrew Handley, the CAD development manager for the UK-based Styles&Wood, commented that as a beta tester, "we have been waiting a long time for AutoCAD to come back to the Mac. Our experience has been that AutoCAD for Mac is similar enough to the PC version that the transition is easy. Weve found it to be a very powerful and reliable product that has all the functionality we need.

The program is designed to seamlessly migrate AutoCAD DWG documents between Mac and Windows PC users, enabling companies to deploy the software without regard to the hardware and operating system their users have.

The company notes that "you can create custom scripts, linetypes, hatch patterns, and command aliases, as well as AutoLISP® and ObjectARX applications, in AutoCAD 2011 for Mac; however, there is no support for DCL in AutoLISP, nor is there access to some of the custom AutoCAD user interface controls in ObjectARX. Technologies specific to Windows®, such as Visual Basic for Applications, OLE objects, and Windows Media® Audio, are not supported in AutoCAD 2011 for Mac."

It also notes that "the most commonly used functionality of AutoCAD is included in AutoCAD for Mac. However, there are a few commands that are not included in this first release, including layer filters, layer groups, and layer states; Sheet Set Manager; and DGN, PDF, and DWF underlay support."



AutoCAD for Mac is available for a free 30 day trial, and is also available to students and educators for free for personal use, or at a significant discount for classroom and lab use. The product can also be purchased directly through the Autodesk Store.

AutoCAD 2011 for Mac requires a relatively new Intel Mac with a 64-bit CPU, 3GB of RAM, and a 1280x800 display. Autodesk specifies a minimum hardware baseline of the "iMac 8,1" from early 2008, the late 2008 "MacBook 5,1" or early 2009 "Mac Mini 3,1" but recommends using the "iMac 11,1" from late 2009, or the mid 2010 "MacBook 7,1" and the brand new "Mac mini 4,1" which was released in June.

Autodesk has also released a free iOS app called AutoCAD WS for the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad that enables users to view, share, and make minor modifications to their designs DWG format. There is also a web based tool for online document review and editing.

post #2 of 28
Autodesk let the Mac user hang to dry for 18 years with no native AutoCad. Now that the Mac is back in vogue, they want to jump in the bandwagon. Anyway, this solution both for the PC and Mac is overpriced... and then one has to pay for a lot of add-ons. Better off with programs like VectorCad for the Mac... or even PC. Meets most requirements and does 3D from the ground up.
post #3 of 28
Curious about the price - if there is any cross grade for those that have a Windows version. Also wonder how they will address some of their professional add on packages (e.g., COGO for Civil Engineers and Land Surveying, Drainage Calculations etc.).

Large market for those applications for Civil Engineers/Architects.
post #4 of 28
Apple is not the only one doing Back to the Mac this week!
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Autodesk let the Mac user hang to dry for 18 years with no native AutoCad. Now that the Mac is back in vogue, they want to jump in the bandwagon.

Ah, yes, the benefits of marketshare.

The free student edition is nice; time to go work on some marketable skills, perhaps.
post #6 of 28
Yea, free for students. Shame coz I don't have the Mac to match it's requirement. Nothing's wrong just getting one while i'm still a student.
post #7 of 28
i have problem downloding!?
is there any direct link!
i try to download free trial!
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Autodesk has officially introduced AutoCAD 2011 for Mac OS X, bringing its freeform 3D design and drafting tools back to the Mac after an 18 year hiatus


This is a rebirth of the Mac as a viable platform for third party developers to create new software and sell it to professionals for a profit. It was the absence of profit expectation which kept many Windows developers from creating a Mac version of their successful Windows applications.

Hopefully, the example of AutoCAD will be followed by other developers.


P.S.: I couldn't use AutoCAD if my life depended on it, but I rejoice every time developers find that my platform of choice is important enough for them to spend time, money and countless hours to develop software for it.


post #9 of 28
No layer manager!?? Can you copy and paste Excel files without OLE? Hope they have a free demo download available.
post #10 of 28
Now if we can just get the price down to $99... I'm in!
post #11 of 28
i will be getting a copy of this installed next week.
[i'm a graphic designer in an architecture firm, and have an architecture background]

i hope Revit isn't far behind, since AutoCAD is basically obsolete now. everything is done in BIM software. [Revit and AutoCAD are both AutoDesk products.]
post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by AjitMD View Post

Autodesk let the Mac user hang to dry for 18 years with no native AutoCad. Now that the Mac is back in vogue, they want to jump in the bandwagon. Anyway, this solution both for the PC and Mac is overpriced... and then one has to pay for a lot of add-ons. Better off with programs like VectorCad for the Mac... or even PC. Meets most requirements and does 3D from the ground up.

Let's see, 18 years ago was 1992, when Windows 3.1 was just released, three years before Windows 95. They dropped Mac OS 7 for Windows 3.1? And how powerful where CAD applications in 1992?
EDIT: I checked, and the first commercial 3D-CAD software came out in 1980 and it was Unigraphics.

(My first contact with CAD was in 1997, 3D-Unigraphics running on SGI machines, boy they were really fast machines for their time.)
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenoz View Post

Now if we can just get the price down to $99... I'm in!

Try DraftSight from SolidWorks.It is a true industrial strength 2D CAD package that SolidWorks released for free. Their goal is to get as many AutoCAD users to switch to SolidWorks 3D as possible, and they seem to be willing to give away a strong 2D package to get them to do it.

http://www.3ds.com/products/draftsight/
post #14 of 28
Psst! Don't tell Monkey-boy. He will really go bananas!
post #15 of 28
.

Ya' know...

AutoDesk is just doing this so they can get at the iPad market...

MSFT, could learn from this!

.
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker."
-auxio-
Reply
"Swift generally gets you to the right way much quicker."
-auxio-
Reply
post #16 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by pauldfullerton View Post

Psst! Don't tell Monkey-boy. He will really go bananas!

Rats and sinking ships come to mind here ...
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ouragan View Post

This is a rebirth of the Mac as a viable platform for third party developers to create new software and sell it to professionals for a profit. It was the absence of profit expectation which kept many Windows developers from creating a Mac version of their successful Windows applications.

Hopefully, the example of AutoCAD will be followed by other developers.


P.S.: I couldn't use AutoCAD if my life depended on it, but I rejoice every time developers find that my platform of choice is important enough for them to spend time, money and countless hours to develop software for it.



Many of the applications actually started on the Mac remember.
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
Been using Apple since Apple ][ - Long on AAPL so biased
nMac Pro 6 Core, MacBookPro i7, MacBookPro i5, iPhones 5 and 5s, iPad Air, 2013 Mac mini, SE30, IIFx, Towers; G4 & G3.
Reply
post #18 of 28
No PDF support?!?!?

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenoz View Post

Now if we can just get the price down to $99... I'm in!

post #20 of 28
Even if the price listed on their webpage was for an unlimited site license it is too much money. Seems to me they want to get all their investment back in the first five copies sold. If they need to charge that much money, I hope this is the only release for Mac and they leave the platform for another 20 years.
AutoCad......... @ best that program might be worth about $1500 for a single user license.
post #21 of 28
Just one more indicator that little by little the tide is turning towards Macs. We could very well be looking at the tipping point where market share leads to more software titles which leads back to more market share, and so on.
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macster2 View Post

AutoCad......... @ best that program might be worth about $1500 for a single user license.

While I agree ACAD is far to expensive given what little ADSK has added to it over the past 5-8 years, the prices are on par with the Windows version.

The thing that pisses me off with the licensing is that they don't dual-license Revit with AutoCAD. For the extortion pricing they have, there is no logical argument for this. I hate Revit, but... we are stuck with it.
post #23 of 28
Those of you complaining about the price must not be very familiar with Autodesk products. Or any highly specialized and sophisticated software created for small markets. These wares cost a fortune to develop and maintain. I know Autodesk Lustre costs something like $55k and you still need another $60k of certified hardware to run it on. Smoke for Mac is $15k and needs another $30k or so in hardware to get the most out of it.

So $4k for AutoCad seems just about right.
post #24 of 28
Just installed autocad 2011 trial up and running on 2008 MAC PRO 3,1.... Does not require newest machines.Though eats ram....
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by noirdesir View Post

Let's see, 18 years ago was 1992, when Windows 3.1 was just released, three years before Windows 95. They dropped Mac OS 7 for Windows 3.1?

Meh - I started on release 8 for DOS. I never did care for the windows release, having gotten used to the command line. I stopped using it around the time they dropped the DOS version which was OK with me.

Every time I use vector drawing programs I start looking for trim and extend...
post #26 of 28
Excellent offer, and well overdue -- and free to students and academics such as professors (I'm a prof) -- however, even as free software, the ancient interface and shaky performance sent me screaming back to order a long-overdue upgrade for Ashlar-Vellum's infinitely superior Cobalt CAD package.

The AutoCAD renderer will leave you profoundly unimpressed (unless you haven't ever used a renderer), and the Mac version apparently doesn't support either uniform or gradient backgrounds (?!), so get used to rendering in a giant black void. Maybe that void is where AutoCAD for Mac was hiding for the past two decades...
post #27 of 28
The mobile version is very welcome. I plan to get an iPad shortly, and this will not be very helpful on site. However, you MUST have a network connection to use it as there's no local storage, or iDisk support. You have to use their website to store the files on - a big mistake I believe. Substations often don't have very good reception.
post #28 of 28
are"t they brought maya too? naturally it should work together.... (wait and see).
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