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First Look: Apple's new Mac OS X 10.7 Lion - Page 4

post #121 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by christopher126 View Post

I thought facetime would be on the latest update...but don't see it?

Best

facetime is on beta downloadable from apple.com
post #122 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

At its "Back to the Mac" event,

Mac sales have tripled in the last five years, with installed base of Macs is now just short of 50 million users. Cook also pointed out that Mac sales grew by 27 percent over the past year, compared to the industry average of just 11 percent. "This didn't just start happening," Cook pointed out. Macs have outpaced the PC industry in each of the last 18 quarters, Cook said.

Cook also cited NPD's August 2010 consumer market share figures for US retail, which gave Apple's Mac brand a whopping 20.7% of PC sales. "With the share rising, and the units rising much faster than the industry, we have a very vibrant developer community," Cook said, pointing out there are now 600,000 registered Mac developers, with 30,000 new applications per month.
]

Does any one have a link to review the NPD numbers showing the 20.7 % numbers?
post #123 of 168
Putting in my vote on Mission Confusing. I know there is some time before the next release and thank goodness for that. This portion needs some major tweaking. Apple should look at the different ways these things interact before coming up with "a whole other way" to do things. I am also thinking that FaceTime could have somehow become part of iChat, or vice versa. All these new apps and methodology. OS X started out with simplicity, has aged and grown. But adding on more features in the hopes of making it more simple -- these things must be more thought out before implementing them. One guy mentioned the 'freedom' of the users. Amen to that. I LOVE Apple, but occasionally they do some oddball things. I look forward to this bit of stumbling (in my opinion) pushing them on to even better things.
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post #124 of 168
Am I the only one who doesn't want the green traffic light changed from "zoom to fit" to "fullscreen?" I'd much prefer a new, dedicated fullscreen button (remember the old purple traffic light way back during the Public Beta days?) or simply a menu bar command + keyboard shortcut.
post #125 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post

Absolutely genius. This now ties together the entire Apple ecosystem. This will likely be the most user-friendly OS Apple has ever released.

I think you mean "the most convoluted OS Apple has ever released." What on Earth is the point of this "Launchpad" when I already have the Dock, Stacks and Spotlight for launching my applications? It's just one extra, pointless application I don't need. The OS should be getting lighter, not more bloated.
post #126 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheff View Post

App store needs a bit of a UI overhaul. It looks pretty ugly (the frame not the contents). And we need explicit guarantees that it will never become the only way to buy software on a mac.

Apple would be committing financial suicide if they actually made the App Store the only way to get new apps on Mac OS X. Because that would mean they'd be locking down their APIs, which developers need to create apps for the iOS devices.

Steve was quite clear to emphasize it's the "best" (very debatable) way to get apps on Mac OS X, but certainly not the only way.
post #127 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quillz View Post

I think you mean "the most convoluted OS Apple has ever released." What on Earth is the point of this "Launchpad" when I already have the Dock, Stacks and Spotlight for launching my applications? It's just one extra, pointless application I don't need. The OS should be getting lighter, not more bloated.

I see Launchpad as replacing the stacks in case of application, I think it will be more user friendly than the stacks.
post #128 of 168
Quote:
The idea of Apple bringing its iOS App Store concept to the Mac has been widely anticipated as a step that would make it easier for users to find and install software, keep their software up to date, greatly reduce software theft (thereby allowing developers to charge less while enjoying higher volumes of sales, just as they have in the iOS App Store) and encourage a rich economy of software development on the Mac in the same way the App Stores for the iPhone and iPad have.

The fear however, voiced by some, is that such a store would prevent Mac users from obtaining software from other sources, prevent the use of older software titles that were not designed to be sold through the store, and perhaps result in new issues over Apple's level of control over Mac software, much as some have worried that Apple is already exercising too much control over its iOS App Store.

To extinguish these fears, Jobs noted that the new Mac App Store won't be the only way to obtain new software; it will only be a new option, "the best," Jobs said.


The iControl is raging on @ Apple and coming to a Mac near you within the next 90 days. Scary!

There are a number of obvious problems:

1- The reason why there are so few developers and software titles on the Mac is not "software theft", but low market share, 5% world market share caused by higher Mac prices, less choices of options and models as a result of the "one size fits all" approach to reducing Apple manufacturing and inventory costs, and the steadfast refusal to licence Mac OS X (or the iOS) to competing manufacturers (No, Apple was never "a software company" contrary to what Steve Jobs just said);

2- "software theft" should be defined as overcharging for an application that does nothing more or nothing better than the applications you already have, especially if you plan only an occasional, limited personal use;

3- The danger of trapping the market by encouraging every developer to use and "benefit" from the Mac App Store so that established developers refuse to release their software outside of the Mac App Store;

4- The occasional unpaid use of software at home or in school is part of learning, akin to using shareware. Software used at work, to gain income, must be paid for as developers rely on royalties to gain their own income, but software used at home for personal purposes in a non-commercial way should be free or mostly free, just like software used in school. Successful developers (like Microsoft) often donate their software to schools, public libraries and not-for-profit organizations.

Once you pay for internet access and computer use, the use of internet is mostly free. Outside of businesses, software should be either free or mostly free (e.g. shareware which you pay "if it's worth it").

The opposite view, now adopted by Apple, is that anyone who has ever listened once to any music (or ringtone, etc.) should pay through the noze for their "sin" so that music executives (not artists...) can enjoy lavish lifestyles for little, if any effort.

I regret to say that if the trap materializes, if the Mac App Store becomes the only way to get and use software on the Mac, I will advise my friends to stay with Windows PC computers and rejoin the Windows crowd as I will always choose freedom over control and entrapment.

By the way, did Apple ever determine how many potential customers they lose by insisting on the App Store for iOS iPhones and iPads? The inability to choose my own software is definitely a good reason to stay away from the iPhone and, possibly, the iPad.

Negatives add up. All the reasons for not buying a product add up.

90% of computers run on Windows. There are many reasons for that, including the possibility to choose what software to use.


post #129 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by ouragan View Post

The iControl is raging on @ Apple and coming to a Mac near you within the next 90 days. Scary!

There are a number of obvious problems:

1- The reason why there are so few developers and software titles on the Mac is not "software theft", but low market share, 5% world market share caused by higher Mac prices, less choices of options and models as a result of the "one size fits all" approach to reducing Apple manufacturing and inventory costs, and the steadfast refusal to licence Mac OS X (or the iOS) to competing manufacturers (No, Apple was never "a software company" contrary to what Steve Jobs just said);

2- "software theft" should be defined as overcharging for an application that does nothing more or nothing better than the applications you already have, especially if you plan only an occasional, limited personal use;

3- The danger of trapping the market by encouraging every developer to use and "benefit" from the Mac App Store so that established developers refuse to release their software outside of the Mac App Store;

4- The occasional unpaid use of software at home or in school is part of learning, akin to using shareware. Software used at work, to gain income, must be paid for as developers rely on royalties to gain their own income, but software used at home for personal purposes in a non-commercial way should be free or mostly free, just like software used in school. Successful developers (like Microsoft) often donate their software to schools, public libraries and not-for-profit organizations.

Once you pay for internet access and computer use, the use of internet is mostly free. Outside of businesses, software should be either free or mostly free (e.g. shareware which you pay "if it's worth it").

The opposite view, now adopted by Apple, is that anyone who has ever listened once to any music (or ringtone, etc.) should pay through the noze for their "sin" so that music executives (not artists...) can enjoy lavish lifestyles for little, if any effort.

I regret to say that if the trap materializes, if the Mac App Store becomes the only way to get and use software on the Mac, I will advise my friends to stay with Windows PC computers and rejoin the Windows crowd as I will always choose freedom over control and entrapment.

By the way, did Apple ever determine how many potential customers they lose by insisting on the App Store for iOS iPhones and iPads? The inability to choose my own software is definitely a good reason to stay away from the iPhone and, possibly, the iPad.

Negatives add up. All the reasons for not buying a product add up.

90% of computers run on Windows. There are many reasons for that, including the possibility to choose what software to use.




1. Just how much software do we need? A more salient question. I've used Macs for years and i've never seen a more vibrant market but the issue is more about exposure as the most exciting software IMO is coming from smaller indie development houses.

2. Theft can be defined by any number of criteria. It's purely subjective.

3. If developers refuse to distribute their software outside of the Mac App Store that would likely mean the success of MAS would a given and the value to the developer was great enough to warrant going exclusive. So long as innovative software is available for the platform I see the danger as being fairly trivial.

4. The App Store has delivered 300k apps that are priced so low it's almost beyond belief. The only way to deliver low cost or free apps is a drop dead easy distribution system that thwarts piracy and potentially ads advertising. The more paying customers a developer can attract the less they must charge for their app to cover development and other hard costs.


I doubt 90% of computers run windows. No one really knows what Windows marketshare is and if they think they do I'd love to know exactly how they've accounted for every percentage point.

I'm sure I can determine how many customers Apple lost because of their iPhone and App Store policy to at least a logical degree. Current share price is over 300$ per share and Apple completed a 20 billion dollar quarter. There is no need to become the app police for the entire platform but with the current infrastructure for software delivery and payment processing in place Apple would be fools not to take advantage of a gold mine and some developers would be fools not to hitch to this ride.

In the end H.L Mencken was right. Man doesn't desire liberty he desires security. The app store comes with peace of mind and security by being a walled garden and that's enough for enough people to make it a rousing success.
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post #130 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Yeah, I love my Magic Mouse, but the truth is it's basically not possible to do anything besides left-click, right-click and scroll. It does those excellently and is well worth it just for that, but the gestures are awkward at best and mostly just don't work.

Agreed. It's just a very uncomfortable hand position for doing gestures on a mouse, and plus the surface needs to be smooth to do gestures. The Magic Mouse is "sticky". I felt really sorry for Craig while he was trying to get mission control to respond on that Magic Mouse, fingers trembling. It's NOT the situations where you want to run into problems.
post #131 of 168
You guys are all freaking out for little to no reason. Right on Apple's Lion webpage it states:

Quote:
We took our best thinking from Mac OS X and brought it to the iPhone. Then we took our best thinking from the iPhone and brought it to iPad. And now were bringing it all back to the Mac with our eighth major release of the worlds most advanced operating system. Mac OS X Lion arrives in summer 2011. Heres a sneak peek at just a few of its features.

The features mentioned are all of the ones that were shown off in the demo. Read the end of the quote above, especially the part in bold.
post #132 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macrosheep View Post

Did anyone else notice during the Lion demo that the Dock no longer had glowing circles beneath the icons of running apps (even Finder)?

I figure that it probably has something to do with the automatic application suspend/resume behavior that they're bringing in from iOS. Maybe the definition of a "running" app in MacOS X will change.

I missed that too and that worries me a bit. They might try to force you to use Launch Pad to store apps and then what appears in the dock is the running apps.

Launchpad will make dragging files onto an app to open a bit of a nightmare. If the app is already open then not so much but otherwise, it would be slow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 11thIndian

As to your second point- let's be clear, you're not going to see apps like CS Suite, Final Cut Studio or 3D Studio Max on the appStore. Inherently, these expensive software packages are LARGE installs containing gigs of data, that would be impractical to download electronically. So the point is sort of moot.

Adobe allows you to download them. Also XCode is a multi-GB download. A lot of these big Suites, people don't even know where to buy them as the companies partner up with local resellers to distribute them.
post #133 of 168
Well, I wonder why Steve Jobs decided to set up this demo of Lion, with so few and moot features to show. Just to prove out that they are working on it? After all, they could have introduced the Mac App Store without any reference to Lion.

And I would be curious to know what kind of comments they were expecting. General applause?
post #134 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by EauVive View Post

Well, I wonder why Steve Jobs decided to set up this demo of Lion, with so few and moot features to show. Just to prove out that they are working on it? After all, they could have introduced the Mac App Store without any reference to Lion.

And I would be curious to know what kind of comments they were expecting. General applause?

I agree with this sentiment. Given what we saw, why did they bother? The only thing I can think of is they wanted to put the idea out there to gauge the general reaction. Excluding the App Store, what they showed was maybe 6 weeks work by a team of 3 or 4.
post #135 of 168
In the demo of the Mac App Store on Lion, the scroll bars were like the ones on iOS devices they appear only when scrolling. If this is going to be a feature of Lion, I better ditch the broken non-scrolling Mighty Mouse before upgrading, because 10.7 is going to need a functioning scrolling mouse, and better still multi-touch mouse or trackpad!

Seems odd that no one has mentioned this yet????
post #136 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by EauVive View Post

Well, I wonder why Steve Jobs decided to set up this demo of Lion, with so few and moot features to show. Just to prove out that they are working on it? After all, they could have introduced the Mac App Store without any reference to Lion.

And I would be curious to know what kind of comments they were expecting. General applause?

Probably because of the myriad of "Apple doesn't care about the Mac" statements. I think by and large most people are happy with Snow Leopard (if they are running it) and the glaring omissions are few and far between.

I think computers should be simplified. I still see new users struggle with basic tasks like open/save documents and basic file management. I think the complexity of dealing with file management is a burden to new users and full screen mode along with perhaps a simplified "iPad'esque hidden file system may be a boon to the more green computer users.

As long as the power is there for the more savvy it's nothing but a good thing IMO.
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post #137 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Probably because of the myriad of "Apple doesn't care about the Mac" statements. I think by and large most people are happy with Snow Leopard (if they are running it) and the glaring omissions are few and far between.

It also made sense to demo it, like they did in the past, when itll probably hit Golden Master in 9 months from now. That is a pretty short window so we should see Betas hitting shortly. Next month, maybe?
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post #138 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post

Probably because of the myriad of "Apple doesn't care about the Mac" statements. I think by and large most people are happy with Snow Leopard (if they are running it) and the glaring omissions are few and far between.

I think computers should be simplified. I still see new users struggle with basic tasks like open/save documents and basic file management. I think the complexity of dealing with file management is a burden to new users and full screen mode along with perhaps a simplified "iPad'esque hidden file system may be a boon to the more green computer users.

As long as the power is there for the more savvy it's nothing but a good thing IMO.

You're right. One of the most scary things, in my opinion, would be to have no choice but to use the new features. I've less than ten apps in my dock, that I use regularly, the others I fetch from the App directory through the Finder when I need to: I have no need for more elaborated gadgets. Besides, I love spaces, but that's related to my twenty years passed on BSD/X/fvwm.

I am not sure this breeding between MacOS and iOS is a good thing. Mobile devices and desktop (or notebooks) are certainly not addressing the same needs, if not the same users. Any kind of blend, in my opinion, is going to disappoint both and satisfy neither.
post #139 of 168
This is what I've been saying all along. Besides a few enlightened individuals, it seems most of the people in here are mindless drones who would profess their love for a pile of shit as long as it has the Apple logo on it.

Face facts: As shown, Lion is a dud. Steve would have taken that additional hour and a half if he had anything to show.

Quote:
Originally Posted by agolongo View Post

Ya Ive been following OS X keynotes since Panther, there are always rumors of big secret features that will be released later, but they never materialize.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinrah View Post

I hate apologists lets make peace with something here, the invite for this event said back to mac and had an image of the next version of OS X, when they finally got to it what they showed us was a maximize button, launchpad and mission control. I dont count the app store since it will be available before Lion even comes out. Lets be honest with ourselves if your going to tease a product you give people something interesting or something that grabs peoples interests and say hey you havent seen anything yet but thats not what happened here. We got some reworked features that were dragged over from the ipad to do duty on the desktop. Anyone who says they are holding out till the last second so that no one can copy them please stop drinking the kool aide. I think Snow Leopard is a wonderful product in how honest it is. They came right out and said you know what this kicks ass so we just need to tidy things up a bit and throw in some cool ideas we had kicking around and since this is a huge reworking of the OS we wont bleed you for it. I guarantee you that whatever "features" they didnt show today 95% of them mare going to be minor stuff that barely register as a bullet point...you know kinda like "we added over 300 new features...like we added imap access to gmail!" I would love to be proven wrong on this but I doubt I will but thats ok because Snow Leopard is an awesome OS X already.
post #140 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post

I don't think I've ever been this underwhelmed with a Mac OS release.

For example, I can't believe they're listing "Full Screen Apps" as a feature.

I've been able to do full screen apps since System 7. It's called the maximize button.

C'mon Apple!

Yep, they even had emphasized that "FaceTime can be used EVEN in a full screen mode". Nice feature, but north worth my time to know about it from these great and magnificent executives.
post #141 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post

Yeah, I love my Magic Mouse, but the truth is it's basically not possible to do anything besides left-click, right-click and scroll. It does those excellently and is well worth it just for that, but the gestures are awkward at best and mostly just don't work.

Works fine for me, gestures and all. So please don't confuse your personal experience with reality.
post #142 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post

This is what I've been saying all along. Besides a few enlightened individuals, it seems most of the people in here are mindless drones who would profess their love for a pile of shit as long as it has the Apple logo on it.

Face facts: As shown, Lion is a dud. Steve would have taken that additional hour and a half if he had anything to show.

I think its pretty mindless of you to categorize someone mindless if he disagrees with you.
Your other accusation is incredible, do you really believe that?

The fact of the matter is that Apple presented a pretty radical usage change of it OS. And thats a big deal. And as Steve Jobs mentioned, the rest of the features will be presented later on.

J.
post #143 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

.... next version of Mac OS X 10.7, codenamed Lion.

HOLD UP THERE... REWIND.

1) Look at the product page, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO MENTION OF THE VERSION NUMBER. Nor did Steve or any Apple presenter at any point give us the version number as being 10.7.
2) When did Steve say "Lion" was a code name? Please give me an exact time code.

This is insane. Talk about speculation and conjecture over actual journalism.
post #144 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by henderson101 View Post

1) Look at the product page, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO MENTION OF THE VERSION NUMBER. Nor did Steve or any Apple presenter at any point give us the version number as being 10.7.

Can't rename Snow Leopard halfway through. Get over it.

Quote:
2) When did Steve say "Lion" was a code name? Please give me an exact time code.

WHEN IT CAME UP ON THE FRICKING SCREEN. It's also on Apple's website. I'm curious as to your purpose for even asking this.

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post #145 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamIIGS View Post

No you haven't you have been expanding a window to 99.9% full screen, you sill have the window "box" and the top bar. Try again please.

The fact remains, though, that various applications for Mac OS X have provided a mechanism for taking up 100% of the display for their own purposes, getting rid of the entire window border, as well as the system menu bar.

Examples:
- Many (most?) video players have a full-screen playback mode
- Firefox for Mac OS X, just like Firefox in every other OS, offers a true full-screen web browsing mode

Perhaps the big difference in 10.7 will be that the OS will offer a standardized API, so that each application doesn't have to re-implement it from scratch.

_______________

On another note, this App Store thing clearly isn't a core selling feature for Lion -- because it's being released as an add-on for Snow Leopard first.
post #146 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post

Wow, you predicted that Apple would make Mac OS X look and act like their cash cow. Congrats, you're a genius.

I fail to see how this is a step forward. Working on 1 app at a time makes sense on a mobile platform due to restrictions in screen size, processing power, and memory. But on a desktop, not only CAN I multitask, but I usually NEED to. The reason I have a big screen is so I can have more than one app present at any given time.

This is a big step forward for the 80% of Mac users who would rather that this thing was simple like their iDevice. What people here forget is that this is not 2000 where only the Mac geek faithful were buying macs. This is 2010 and beyond and the vast majority of the market for Macs is the non-technical, the single-tasking, the get it done and move on crowd. Why we are defending a 30 year old paradigm based on an imaginary office-based workflow, I don't know.

The complex windowed, freeform workflow world of desktop OSs has always been a nerd creation of what geeks think everyone should do. Its like Knowledge Management geeks have tried to corral us into complex taxonomies and structures that no-one really wants to use. That is being blown away by search-centric, social collaboration modes and I think similarly, the complex windowed interface could well become the optional not dominant form of operation for PCs.

I think back to my sci-fi where most examples I can remember - ST-TNG, minority report, etc. seemed to be full screen apps and at most dashboards. Pick an app, bring it to the front, kill it, move on.
I could be wrong but that is how it seemed. I just don't believe that most humans are good parallel processing animals. Let the OS manage a dashboard and background processes but don't make me do it unless I choose to.
post #147 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by MuncyWeb View Post

Putting in my vote on Mission Confusing. I know there is some time before the next release and thank goodness for that. This portion needs some major tweaking. Apple should look at the different ways these things interact before coming up with "a whole other way" to do things. I am also thinking that FaceTime could have somehow become part of iChat, or vice versa. All these new apps and methodology. OS X started out with simplicity, has aged and grown. But adding on more features in the hopes of making it more simple -- these things must be more thought out before implementing them. One guy mentioned the 'freedom' of the users. Amen to that. I LOVE Apple, but occasionally they do some oddball things. I look forward to this bit of stumbling (in my opinion) pushing them on to even better things.

I think that Apple needs to stop listening to the people on this forum first and foremost. Judging by the past few products and releases, they have done that, only no-one told all the blowhards on AI.

The people here mostly represent the Apple of the the past, as it was when it was a $5Bn company and sold 3M Macs per year. Since then it has become 12 times larger, sells 4.5x as many Macs, has 5x the number of iOS users as OSX users and many of them are non-technical and like neither the complexity of OSX or Win7. Apple is pandering to its core market now and it is not us.

10.7 looks like a transition where the consumer OS is still half baked but 10.8 will probably have 2 very different modes - Pro and consumer OS UX's. Apple won't look to alienate its loyal but small base but must focus on its new core - average Joes.
I will continue with the Pro-OS but most of the people I have influenced into buying macs will do much better on a single-tasking OS model based on iOS operations.
post #148 of 168
Please stop reacting to this product demo as if it is a final release. Saying that this is the most disappointing release of the Mac OS is nuts. They showed a few features that were probably selected because of their visual impact. Moreover, we have no idea how un/usable these features will be. Breathe.

I've seen a few comments that suggest Spaces will be removed. Is this a documented fact, or a deduction from the demo?

I believe that we are getting our first glimpses into a future of computing that moves away from the desktop metaphor. Look at iTunes and iPhoto, for example. These apps manage the files and allow the user to interact with the content instead of the file system; both are also good full screen candidates. This is the same approach that is implemented on the iphone/ipad, which is generally a good thing. However, I do not want to see the Finder done away with, and I never want to be forced to ONLY interact in a full screen environment. Apple will likely strike a balance, that allows the user to determine the computing experience.
post #149 of 168
I have had a good time being a complete apple nut over the past 6 years but today about sealed it for me. I love all my apple computers and my iPhone that I have now. But this new OS stuff is just silly and (off topic) if the macbook air was about $300 cheaper, I would be all about it. I feel all of this has made any pro-argument I have about apple invalid. It has been a fun ride. I hope to return some day.
post #150 of 168
Launch Pad? Mission Control - Mac Command Centre? How embarrassing! What's the Preferences going to be called, Tranquility Base?

All my Apps are listed alphabetically in a folder called ... Applications. I have added my Application folder to my dock and when I click on it a scrolling alphabetical list window appears and I can drill down into sub folders. It's so elegant. Have Apple forgotten about this neat facility? Alternatively there's Spotlight. Why are they wasting resources fixing something that ain't broke? In the meantime there are many other Finder improvements they could make.

For one, I would like it if Apple made it an option to automatically open two Finder windows with one beneath the other. In the meantime I'm using TotalFinder and its Finder tabs which are very clever and useful. And I've just noticed a flashlight or halo effect around the mouse pointer as it is moved from one tab to the next - cool, I've not seen that before!

If what we've seen of LION represents THE MOST eye-catching improvements due to be made then Apple had better price the upgrade at no more than $9.99. \
post #151 of 168
I didn't see anything really that couldn't be implemented on Leopard. In fact the AppStore (and facetime?) are already slated for snow leopard.

Front Row and even a lot of flash apps already can do the fullscreen thing.


Am I becoming non overwhelamable? or is this bigger than I think?


Obviously there' more to come...


As for the iLife update. Underwhelmed again for 2 years of development. By now I'd think I could enter lyrics and I WOULD get overwhelmed if Garageband could SING them too!! Yea. Not gonna happen.
post #152 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

That was a good call be my on the zoom-window button becoming a fullscreen button.

I have to say though, I'm not happy with Mission Control. I find it very confusing compared to the way the Mac is now. I know this is beta software, but I think they need to do some rethinking/re-engineering on that. It's sort of a mess in my opinion. I do however like the Launchpad, but I think the dock should be hidden when Launchpad is open, with arrow-buttons for going through app pages - in addition to those gestures. I don't have a magic-trackpad, and I never will.

Then maybe you should consider sticking to windows 7 operating system then, I think these features are expanding on already very useful features and they're a welcome addition to the overall feel and usability of macosx.
post #153 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capnbob View Post

The complex windowed, freeform workflow world of desktop OSs has always been a nerd creation of what geeks think everyone should do. Its like Knowledge Management geeks have tried to corral us into complex taxonomies and structures that no-one really wants to use.

vi will never die!!! And don't give me none of that abomination vim, either!

I think Apple had to demo Lion so they could start seeding it to developers. They know the second they do, someone will break the NDA. Much better to give a sneak peak and get ahead of the rumor mill.

- Jasen.
post #154 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasenj1 View Post

vi will never die!!! And don't give me none of that abomination vim, either!

Vi is for morons. Real programmers use ed, of course!
post #155 of 168
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Originally Posted by zindako View Post

Then maybe you should consider sticking to windows 7 operating system then.

Don't tell me what OS to use. Just because I use and like Snow Leopard doesn't mean I have to like what Apple does with Lion. Get a clue.
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
Citing unnamed sources with limited but direct knowledge of a rumoured device - Comedy Insider (Feb 2014)
Reply
post #156 of 168
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Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post

I agree about the app store for the Mac being a great idea. I just don't like the UI alterations to hobble the Mac with a more iOS looking interface. Makes no sense for professionals and experienced Mac users, but it will make the noobs more comfortable. Getting a bad feeling with this looming update.

Hey, you may be right, but consider this: look carefully at the way they pulled off the iPhoto '11 full-screen mode, and compare with how the current File/Edit/View/Random stuff/Window menu paradigm works in action: I don't think the full-screen idea is just to comfort the noobs. It's more of an evolution that at least in some cases actually makes some more sense in terms of how to construct interface metaphors.

- At the bottom of the iPhoto screen is, just like in most iOS applications, buttons to change between different categories of objects that the application manipulates. As these are the main controls besides the objects on the screen themselves, it replaces the often pretty awkward View menu (often used to switch both between categories of objects and various view options), and puts the objects into the center of attention.

- the view options are in the bottom-left corner.
- In the bottom-right corner are the "action" buttons, but obviously, these will change depending on the context/category of objects that one is operating on at the moment. The same is true of the view options. Thus we have ridden ourselves of often half a screenful of inactive menu items.

- By focusing on kinds of objects/ contexts, rather than windows, as the basic unit of the applications we're basically rid of the Window menu. Nothing stops an application from letting you move interface elements around as you see fit... there's just no need for a Window menu for it. Windows as metaphors actually surprisingly often don't make sense, and that's probably more obvious to noobs than us seasoned freaks.

- With auto-save, and by focusing on documents as one object category among others, rather than as files, the File menu starts to look old. I admit I don't know what the file system interface will look like in the future, though I guess we're heading towards something more ZFS-like and maybe changed metaphors in the process, but something clearly will (need to) happen.

So, I don't think Apple are out of their minds. But it does feel kind of spooky to have a corporation re-design the way we interact with our preciouses...
post #157 of 168
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Originally Posted by nkhm View Post

The dock is instant access in all screens to favourite apps. Launchpad is way of sorting and accessing all apps. Is there any problem with having two ways of doing the same thing, exactly as you do today - use the dock, stick your apps folder into the dock to act as a stack, or view the apps folder in finder. Work the way that you prefer - it's called choice.

I agree. I still use DragThing a third party shareware utility that first came out in 1994 in addition to Apple's dock as it has a few features that the dock doesn't have and also since I have been using it since it first came out. Launchpad will just give me a third way to launch programs.
post #158 of 168
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Originally Posted by Ireland View Post

I can see why you'd think that, but how else do you do a home screen on the Mac? Which is probably needed when you have a App Store experience.

The thing I find really confusing -besides M.C. - is having both a dock and the launcher around together. Why should the dock exist when there's a launcher? Not that I dislike the dock, it's just confusing. The dock is a launcher, so why do we need two launchers?

This is the same question as why iOS has an application switcher, when Jobs said "if you see an application switcher, they blew it", isn't it? Yet in iOS you don't need to use the application switcher, it's only a list of recently active apps. The Dock becomes a cross between the iOS Dock and application switcher i think. No idea exactly how, though.
post #159 of 168
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Originally Posted by mitchelljd View Post

But will OSX Lion support BLU-RAY??????

this is retarded how backward Apple is being all to protect their iTunes movie rentals. BS, Apple makes alot of money. look at this Quarters Apple Earnings.

I don't think it's just about money. If they commit to making any of their products with Blu-Ray drives, any products they leave it out on will seem inferior. The future of notebooks is what you see in the Macbook Air and there's no optical in there at all.

1080p video is probably the highest resolution consumer format that will ever be distributed and H.264 at 8Mbps bitrate is plenty so a movie download is under 6GB. On a 10Mbps connection, this would stream down in real-time or you could download it in under 90 minutes.

Optical disc authoring is such a pain. Just going straight to a digital format and uploading it somewhere is so much easier. Blank Blu-Ray discs aren't all that cheap yet and most come in at £5 each but some packs come in just under £2 per disc.

They take nearly an hour to burn a 25GB disc and your sanity would wear pretty thin hitting a burn error in there. I'd much rather fill 8GB USB pen drives at £8 each that take 10 minutes for each and I could copy 4 at once on a desktop and 2 at once on a laptop.

Once Nand memory halves in price next year, 8GB drives come down to £4 and so on to the point where Blu-Ray is meaningless in 2 years for personal authoring. Netflix are now starting to go streaming-only:

http://iptv.tmcnet.com/topics/iptv/a...ice-the-us.htm

"Three years ago we were a DVD-by-mail company that offered some streaming. We are now a streaming company, which also offers DVD-by-mail."
post #160 of 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtm135 View Post

I got the impression that's all there was. Is there evidence to the contrary?

If that's the impression you got, then I don't think anyone can help you.
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