or Connect
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Briefly: New Mac OS X 10.6.5 beta, iPod levies in EU, News Corp shelving digital newsstand project
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Briefly: New Mac OS X 10.6.5 beta, iPod levies in EU, News Corp shelving digital newsstand project

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Apple has released a new beta for its forthcoming Mac OS X 10.6.5 update, while an EU court ruling may block 'copying levies' placed on iPods and iPhones. Also, News Corp. is putting its plans for an iPad-specific digital newsstand on hold, a new report claims.

Mac OS X 10.6.5

Apple's latest pre-release copy of Mac OS X 10.6.5 is labeled build 10H562. The beta was released to developers late Thursday as a 616MB delta update. According to the release notes, there are no known issues. With new builds coming steadily for several months now, the update is expected to arrive in advance of the November release of iOS 4.2.

The seed note accompanying the build specifies Printing as a "Focus Area." 10.6.5 will work with iOS devices running iOS 4.2 to enable the new AirPrint wireless printing functionality. 10.6.4, the last update to Mac OS X 10.6, came in June with fixes to Adobe Creative Suite 3 issues and a resolution for unresponsive keyboards and trackpads.

EU rules on iPod levies

The European Court of Justice has ruled against overly broad copying levies that could affect iPods, smartphones and other devices, according to iPodNN. Copying levies place a fee on blank media and devices that allow copying, then distribute that fee to content owners and copyright holders. The ruling, which needs to be codified by the European Commission, would limit private copying levies to devices explicitly meant for copying (e.g., a DVD burner). If upheld, it could result in lower prices for European consumers on devices like the iPod, iPhone, and even printers.

News Corp.'s iPad Division

News Corp. is shelving a plan to create a subscription-based digital newsstand for iPad content, a person "familiar with the matter" has told the Wall Street Journal. "Project Alesia," as it was known, was a tablet-focused initiative with the goal of "selling access to news from a variety of publishers."

The source told the Journal, which News Corp. owns, that the media conglomerate had invested around $31.5 million on the venture, with over 100 people working on it in the U.K., although the company still sees the idea as potentially having "tremendous value" to the industry.

Rumors of a News Corp. tablet subscription service emerged this summer, picking up steam when News Corp.-owned Fox agreed to a 99-cent TV show rental plan for streaming the network's shows to the new Apple TV. At the time, it was suggested that News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch had agreed to the rental model to cement a relationship with Apple in hopes of creating a digital newsstand for the iPad.
post #2 of 17
Ha, someone's in a hurry to get off work
Summer '09 Macbook 6 GB RAM, SSD; iPhone 3GS, aTV v.2

Jesus told her, I am the resurrection and the life. Anyone who believes in me will live, even after dying. Anyone who lives in me and [trusts]...
Reply
Summer '09 Macbook 6 GB RAM, SSD; iPhone 3GS, aTV v.2

Jesus told her, I am the resurrection and the life. Anyone who believes in me will live, even after dying. Anyone who lives in me and [trusts]...
Reply
post #3 of 17
I don't understand, does AI usually update this late on fridays? If they have I certainly never noticed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox

Being an Apple basher means you never, ever have to acknowledge success.
Reply
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox

Being an Apple basher means you never, ever have to acknowledge success.
Reply
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by trevorlsciact View Post

I don't understand, does AI usually update this late on fridays? If they have I certainly never noticed.

Too bad it's Thursday, on the West Coast.
post #5 of 17
I was hoping News Corp would just shrivel up and die. For the bs they are putting us Cablevision subscribers through at the moment, anyway. I don't miss them at all, although Family Guy maybe a little. But they blocked the website over the weekend from CV addresses, and that was just too far for me to consider going back. I'll just catch reruns on TBS or 11. Thanks, Fox
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdriftmeyer View Post

Too bad it's Thursday, on the West Coast.

oops! Nevertheless, this is rather late for a new article, especially one like this that could easily be posted tomorrow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox

Being an Apple basher means you never, ever have to acknowledge success.
Reply
Quote:
Originally Posted by addabox

Being an Apple basher means you never, ever have to acknowledge success.
Reply
post #7 of 17
As for the European Court of Justice, it ruled against the "copy tax" only in the case of professional use, this would change nothing for the general public (and so for most of iPods buyers).
At contrary, to ensure that the money collected by the tax stays the same, the tax could become even higher...
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by luinil View Post

As for the European Court of Justice, it ruled against the "copy tax" only in the case of professional use, this would change nothing for the general public (and so for most of iPods buyers).
At contrary, to ensure that the money collected by the tax stays the same, the tax could become even higher...

Higher than 17.5% \
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post

Higher than 17.5% \

do not underestimate the cupidity of the disc industry.. it has no limits
post #10 of 17
Rupert Murdoch probably saw that Obama met with Jobs - threw a fit, cancelled "Project Alesia," then wrote another $1 million check to the tea party.
post #11 of 17
So all the blank CDs and DVDs I've been using for backups all these years have had a tax on them sent directly to the entertainment industry?

Anyone know how much?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post

Higher than 17.5% \

Is this on discs or drives or what? Anyone know how it applies?

see http://mafiaa.org/
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banalltv View Post

So all the blank CDs and DVDs I've been using for backups all these years have had a tax on them sent directly to the entertainment industry?

see http://mafiaa.org/

don't know how is the tax in Ireland, but this tax isn't about the illegal downloading, it's a tax to compensate the money the majors 'loose' when you copy the music (and movies) you bought...

the tax is different in all European countries, but in France it applies to all extern storage that could remotely be used to record music (discs, hard drives, flash cards, iPhones, etc... they also want to put it on some GPS) the price is also different in every country, France has one of the highest so a lot of people buy their storage media in other European countries.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by luinil View Post

this tax isn't about the illegal downloading, it's a tax to compensate the money the majors 'loose' when you copy the music (and movies) you bought...

That makes it even worse. Me angry now. Ta for the reply.
post #14 of 17
Yep, this isn't a tax on pirating, it's a tax on private copying - or backing up your own cds or ripping them to your iPod.
Artists don't get much of any of it (at least in France). The big Maison de Disques get most of it.
post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

News Corp.'s iPad Division

News Corp. is shelving a plan to create a subscription-based digital newsstand for iPad content, a person "familiar with the matter" has told the Wall Street Journal.

I guess that they didn't read in the newspapers that Apple is going to single-handedly save their entire industry.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Banalltv View Post

see http://mafiaa.org/

Love the acronym.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
... At the time, it was suggested that News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch had agreed to the rental model to cement a relationship with Apple in hopes of creating a digital newsstand for the iPad. ...

For centuries, blacksmithing was a huge industry. Horses constantly needed horseshoes, and business was great. Then the automobile arrived and everything changed.

Times change.

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply

Sent from my iPhone Simulator

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Discussion
AppleInsider › Forums › General › General Discussion › Briefly: New Mac OS X 10.6.5 beta, iPod levies in EU, News Corp shelving digital newsstand project