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Glitch in Apple's iOS 4.1 allows iPhone access without passcode - Page 2

post #41 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by mstone View Post

Me either. My phone is either in my possession or on the night stand while i'm asleep or in the shower, plus there is nothing to hide anyway. Of course there was that one instance where it went through the washing machine and it came out permanently locked.

But most people do have confidential information on their phones...
  • apps that provide access to external accounts, such as banks, one-click shopping, online document storage like iDisk, etc.
  • contacts that they don't want to share with the world.
  • email and sms threads that they don't want compromised.
  • photos of their kids, etc.
  • nevermind the fact that someone can use your phone.

The large enterprise I work for hasn't forced the keycode lock on us, but they sent out a strongly-worded warning a couple years ago after what appeared to be a corporate espionage mission that involved several executives' phones being stolen. It was pretty clear that anyone compromising corporate data by losing their cell phone would be in hot water, and they did tell everyone they should use a passcode.

Personally, I always lock my iPhone, and 4 of the 5 guys I work with lock theirs as well.
post #42 of 47
I lock it to prevent people from messing with my stuff. Probably a habit from my high school days when I had "friends" that used to play with my Casio "PDA-Calculator" thing and go through my stuff and then make fun of me.

Yes. Childhood trauma makes for good habits in adult life.
post #43 of 47
If you have a PIN set on your SIM card the iPhone won't ask for it if you do a hard reboot (press and hold power & home button until it reboots). This behavior goes back to at least the second model from 2008. Don't know about the 1st iPhone from 2007 though...
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
How to enter the Apple logo  on iOS:
/Settings/Keyboard/Shortcut and paste in  which you copied from an email draft or a note. Screendump
Reply
post #44 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger_one View Post

I keep my Windows machines up to date at least weekly, and I just finished installing 13 "critical" security fixes. ...

It was so bad on our office network that you couldn't even plug a newly-installed machine into the network without getting a virus before you could download and install the AV updates..



Why don't you just set the computer to automatically download and update in the background?

And WRT to your network at work, I've never heard of anything like that. I assume that you don't use any firewall software? How the heck is ANYTHING getting installed? How the heck is ANYTHING getting into the machine without your knowing in detail?

Just hooking it up to your LAN results in viruses? You've got major unusual problems in your network. You need serious professional assistance with it. There are plenty of turnkey solutions that would eliminate your problems pretty much 100%.

What you describe is nothing short of bizarre.
post #45 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-J View Post

Why don't you just set the computer to automatically download and update in the background?

And WRT to your network at work, I've never heard of anything like that. I assume that you don't use any firewall software? How the heck is ANYTHING getting installed? How the heck is ANYTHING getting into the machine without your knowing in detail?

Just hooking it up to your LAN results in viruses? You've got major unusual problems in your network. You need serious professional assistance with it. There are plenty of turnkey solutions that would eliminate your problems pretty much 100%.

What you describe is nothing short of bizarre.

If you enable automatic background updates, many will result in your system being rebooted automatically. Great way to lose data. I do my Windows updates manually on my work PC.

As for being compromised simply be being placed on the network, this is far from 'unusual', though there are trivial steps that can be taken to reduce this, the first being to enable the desktop firewall. Windows security has obviously improved, but I remember back during XPSP1 days, an unfirewall PC placed on the internet would be compromised within minutes, usually by botnets that were scanning IP ranges for port exploits. These system had the exact problem described, of being compromised before you could download and install critical security patches and security software. If systems on your local network are already compromised, then without your local firewall enabled, you are as vulnerable as a naked PC on the internet. A lot of organizations might not force local firewalls on, if they feel protected by their network firewall. Default enabled hidden shares (C$, Admin$, etc) on PCs also make them vulnerable right out of the box. Vista and Windows 7 have made a lot of improvements to security and default configurations, but that doesn't make them invulnerable to network based attacks. XP is also still very common, and with it, all of it's vulnerabilities.

You are very right that there are many available solutions, but their existence shows that there problems are very much 'usual'.

to ranger_one: you really need to encourage your workplace to secure their PC prior to putting them on the network, default all PCs to have their firewalls turned on, possibly use a common, preconfigured imaged that is 'secure' for all new PCs, install or image proper AV/antimalware software on all PC and maybe hire an outside IT security consultant to advise your internal IT on how to properly protect their environment.

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply

"My 8th grade math teacher once said: "You can't help it if you're dumb, you are born that way. But stupid is self inflicted."" -Hiro. 

...sometimes it's both
Reply
post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by champak256 View Post

Fixed in iOS 4.2 beta 3. Fandroids will make sure thatnobody ever hears about that.

So let me make sure I am understanding your point. You think that because developers who PAY for access to be able to run BETA software on their phones have access to a fix, that this must be a non issue for the rest of us? Yeah, it must be only the fandroids complaining because those of us with iPhones are all developers or we don't care!

As a long time multiple iPhone owner, I do care about major security flaws, and I most certainly do not consider a fix in beta to be even remotely relevant to me. It would be nice if Apple could stop digging in their heels and revisit the decision not to offer security patches for IOS. A quick over the air update, or even an AppStore update of a few k could easily fix this bug. Since they already fixed it in Beta, they obviously knew about it, and already developed a fix for it, but they CHOOSE not to release the fix to the masses. Pure BS IMHO. Personally I think once Apple is aware of a flaw like this, they have an obligation to warn their customers about the risk, and to offer a patch to EVERYONE as quickly as practical.
post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe hs View Post

Any running 4.1

last time I checked, no ipod touch as an 'emergency call' button with which to activate this trick.

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply

A non tech's thoughts on Apple stuff 

(She's family so I'm a little biased)

Reply
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